Tag Archive | "YouTube"

Wyze Announces $20 Million in VC Funding via YouTube Docudrama

Wyze has always been anything but boring. They have an affordable $ 20 security camera that makes Ring users wonder if they’ve wasted their money. One of their founders, Dave Crosby, has an adorable singing daughter Claire Crosby that has appeared on Ellen and has 1.5 million subscribers to her YouTube channel. Dave has also been a contestent on The Voice.

Now Wyze has announced $ 20 million in Series A funding in dramatic fashion via a YouTube docudrama. It makes sense. Wyze considers their customers their community and being honest is part of the Wyze DNA. Letting customers in on the struggles of a startup via a documentary style video is a great way to reinforce that trust with their community.

Wyze Announces $ 20 Million in VC Funding via YouTube Docudrama

The funding round is led by Norwest Venture Partners and comes on the heels of Wyze’s massive success in selling over 1.5 million units of its first products, Wyze Cam and Wyze Cam Pan, since launching in October 2017. This funding is in addition to the previous seed funding investment from iSeed Ventures.

“We’ve had a singular focus on making pragmatic hardware and software that actually improve people’s lives, and this new capital infusion will help us continue that mission,” said Yun Zhang, Co-Founder and CEO of Wyze. “Without our tremendous and wonderful community, we would never have been able to build a $ 100 million company in just one year. We’re looking forward to offering them more, and listening to the community’s feedback as we continue to expand into new areas of the home.”

“This is the story about a lemon aid stand,” says Wyze founders and employees. “A story about a guy who put everything on the line. A story about 800,000 people that decided to give a no-name startup in Seattle a shot. A story about a brand that’s about to be a household name. At least that’s the plan. This is a story about you. This is a story about $ 20 million.”

“Now thanks to you there are 800,000 people at our lemon aid stand,” Wyze says. “Because you gave us such great feedback on the forums and the different social media our product is just getting better and better. Over 80 percent of customers have shared Wyze Cam with a friend. That is amazing. Thank you. That kind of growth is hard to manage.”

“Wyze proved that a smart home camera doesn’t have to be expensive to be great, which has driven adoption across a much broader base of consumers than ever before,” said Parker Barrile, Partner at Norwest Venture Partners. “I’m excited to partner with Yun and his team to build the next generation of smart home devices and services that everyone can afford.”

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SearchCap: DuckDuckGo growth, YouTube campaigns & ABM measurements

Below is what happened in search today, as reported on Search Engine Land and from other places across the web.



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.


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YouTube SEO: Top Factors to Invest In – Whiteboard Friday

Posted by randfish

If you have an audience on YouTube, are you doing everything you can to reach them? Inspired by a large-scale study from Justin Briggs, Rand covers the top factors to invest in when it comes to YouTube SEO in this week’s episode of Whiteboard Friday.

Click on the whiteboard image above to open a high-resolution version in a new tab!

Video Transcription

Howdy, Moz fans, and welcome to another edition of Whiteboard Friday. This week we’re chatting about YouTube SEO. So I was lucky enough to be speaking at the Search Love Conference down in San Diego a little while ago, and Justin Briggs was there presenting on YouTube SEO and on a very large-scale study that he had conducted with I think it was 100,000 different video rankings across YouTube’s search engine as well as looking at the performance of many thousands of channels and individual videos in YouTube.

Justin came up with some fascinating results. I’ve called them out here @JustinBriggs on Twitter, and his website is Briggsby.com. You can find this study, including an immense amount of data, there. But I thought I would try and sum up some of the most important points that he brought up and some of the conclusions he came to in his research. I do urge you to check out the full study, especially if you’re doing YouTube SEO.

5 crucial elements for video ranking success

So first off, there are some crucial elements for video ranking success. Now video ranking success, what do we mean by that? We mean if you perform a search query in YouTube for a specific keyword, and not necessarily a branded one, what are the things that will come up? So sort of like the same thing we talk about when we talk about Google success ranking factors, these are success factors for YouTube. That doesn’t necessarily mean that these are the things that will get you the most possible views. In fact, some of them work the other way.

1. Video views and watch time

First off, video views and watch time. So it turns out these are both very well correlated and in Justin’s opinion probably causal with higher rankings. So if you have a video and you’re competing against a competitor’s video and you get more views and a greater amount of watch time on average per view — so that’s how many people make it through a greater proportion of the video itself –you tend to do better than your competitors.

2. Keyword matching the searcher’s query in the title

Number two, keyword matching still more important we think on YouTube than it is in classic Google search. That’s not to say it’s not important in classic Google, but that in YouTube it’s even more important. It’s even a bigger factor. Essentially what Justin’s data showed is that exact match keywords, exactly matching the keyword phrase in the video title tended to outperform partial by a little bit, and partial outperformed none or only some by a considerable portion.

So if you’re trying to rank your video for what pandas eat and your video is called “What Pandas Eat,”that’s going to do much better than, for example, “Panda Consumption Habits” or “Panda Food Choices.” So describe your video, name your video in the same way that searchers are searching, and you can get intel into how searchers are using YouTube.

You can also use the data that comes back from Google keyword searches, especially if videos appear at the top of Google keyword searches, that means there’s probably a lot of demand on YouTube as well.

3. Shorter titles (<50 characters) with keyword-rich descriptions

Next up, shorter titles, less than 50 characters, with keyword-rich descriptions between 200 and 350 words tended to perform best in this dataset.

So if you’re looking for guidelines around how big should I make my YouTube title, how big should I make my description, that’s generally probably some best practices. If you leak over a little bit, it’s not a huge deal. The curve doesn’t fall off dramatically. But certainly staying around there is a good idea.

4. Keyword tags

Number four, keyword tags. So YouTube will let you apply keyword tags to a video.

This is something that used to exist in Google SEO decades ago with the meta keywords tag. It still does exist in YouTube. These keyword tags seem to matter a little for rankings, but they seem to matter more for the recommended videos. So those recommended videos are sort of what appear on the right-hand side of the video player if you’re in a desktop view or below the video on a mobile player.

Those recommended videos are also kind of what play when you keep watching a video and it’s what comes up next. So those both figure prominently into earning you more views, which can then help your rankings of course. So using keyword tags in two to three word phrase elements and usually the videos that Justin’s dataset saw performing best were those with 31 to 40 unique tags, which is a pretty hefty number.

That means folks are going through and they’re taking their “What Pandas Eat” and they’re tagging it with pandas, zoo animals, mammals, and they might even be tagging it with marsupials — I think pandas are a marsupial — but those kinds of things. So they’re adding a lot of different tags on there, 31 to 40, and those tended to do the best.

So if you’re worried that adding too many keyword tags can hurt you, maybe it can, but not up until you get to a pretty high limit here.

5. Certain video lengths perform and rank well

Number five, the videos that perform best — I like that this correlates with how Whiteboard Fridays do well as well — 10 to 16 minutes in length tend to do best in the rankings. Under two minutes in length tend to be very disliked by YouTube’s audience. They don’t perform well. Four to six minutes get the most views. So it depends on what you’re optimizing for. At Whiteboard Friday, we’re trying to convey information and make it useful and interesting and valuable. So we would probably try and stick to 10 to 16 minutes. But if we had a promotional video, for example, for a new product that we were launching, we might try and aim for a four to six minute video to get the most views, the most amplification, the most awareness that we possibly could.

3 takeaways of interest

Three other takeaways of interest that I just found potentially valuable.

Older videos do better on average, but new videos get a boost

One is older videos on average tend to do better in the rankings, but new videos get a boost when they initially come out. So in the dataset, Justin created a great graph that looks like this –zero to two weeks after a video is published, two to six weeks, six to twelve weeks, and after a year, and there are a few other ones in here.

But you can see the slope of this curve follows this concept that there’s a fresh boost right here in those first two to six weeks, and it’s strongest in the first zero to two weeks. So if you are publishing regularly and you sort of have that like, “Oh, this video didn’t hit. Let me try again.This video didn’t hit. Oh, this one got it.This nailed what my audience was looking for.This was really powerful.” That seems to do quite well.

Channels help boost their videos

Channels is something Justin looked deeply into. I haven’t covered it much here, but he looked into channel optimization a lot. Channels do help boost their individual videos with things like subscribers who comment and like and have a higher watch time on average than videos that are disconnected from subscribers. He noted that about 1,000 or more subscriptions is a really good target to start to benefit from the metrics that a good subscriber base can bring. These tend to have a positive impact on views and also on rankings. Although whether that’s correlated or merely causal, hard to say.

Embeds and links are correlated, but unsure if causal

Again on the correlation but not causation, embeds and links. So the study looked at the rankings, higher rankings up here and lower rankings down there, versus embeds.

Videos that received more embeds, they were embedded on websites more, did tend to perform better. But through experimentation, we’re not quite clear if we can prove that by embedding a video a lot we can increase its rankings. So it could just be that as something ranks well and gets picked up a lot, many people embed it rather than many embeds lead to better rankings.

All right, everyone, if you’re producing video, which I probably recommend that you do if video is ranking in the SERPs that you care about or if your audience is on YouTube, hopefully this will be helpful, and I urge you to check out Justin’s research. We’ll see you again next week for another edition of Whiteboard Friday. Take care.

Video transcription by Speechpad.com

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PrestonPlayz on How to Use Super Chats to Increase YouTube Revenue

Popular (7.5 million subs) YouTube live streamer PrestonPlayz recently explained the Super Chat feature to all those trying to make money on the YouTube platform:

What is a Super Chat?

A Super Chat is, essentially, a comment that is going to be pinned and highlighted in your live stream chat. Depending on the monetary amount that they Super Chatted, it will change colors and the duration for how long it’s going to be pinned, it could be longer or shorter. I definitely think that Super Chatting gives us and the viewers a really cool way to engage with one another and of course, you can also develop a new source of income for your channel.

Why Super Chat?

You might be thinking why Super Chat? One of the coolest things in my opinion about YouTube is the direct interaction we get to do with our audience, whether you’re a gaming live streamer or live streaming yourself cooking something. It doesn’t matter what you’re doing, you can still engage with your audience. Super Chat does a great job at that.

Super Chat Increases Engagement and Revenue

Super Chat is integrated into YouTube which means it’s extremely accessible for your viewers and very easy to use, not to mention it’s kind of like a domino effect. When one viewer super chats, then another Super Chats, and then another, it catches on like fire and it’s awesome.

Not only is Super Chat a great way to start communicating more with your audience and let them be heard, but of course you can also use it to increase your revenue. I actually ended up using a lot of the super chat revenue that I made to fund other videos, it’s a win-win situation.

Introducing Super Chat to Your Audience

When enabling Super Chats on your channel for the first time I think it’s very important for you to make sure you introduce it to your audience. You should briefly mention it at the beginning of your next live stream saying, “Hey guys I’ve got this new awesome feature Super Chat. If you guys want to support the channel consider sending a Super Chat.” As soon as somebody does the first Super Chat you can show it off… “Guys, that’s the Super Chat, look at the comments right now. This is somebody who’s Super Chatted.”

Now their message is up there for everybody to see. Not only do they get to interact with you but they’re Super Chat is now showcased off to everybody watching the live stream, which I think a lot of viewers really like.

Super Chat Best Practices

Let’s go over some of the best Super Chat practices. Always thank people for their Super Chats no matter how small or large it is. People are much more likely to come back to your future live streams if you engage with their super chat and of course engage with your live stream viewers directly. If possible, depending on the question of the Super chat try to think about some fun ways you can answer it so that way it’s not the same way each and every time.

Think of Fun Ways to Respond

Make sure you’re also noticing them quickly. I’m not saying as soon as they send it you have to read it as fast as you can, but of course the sooner that you can notice them the more appreciated they will feel. It’s also very important to make sure that you’re staying engaged with whatever you are live-streaming about as well as your audience.

Set challenges in your live streams so when you hit a certain tier of Super Chats or a certain amount of Super Chats you’re going to do something. It should be something small, silly, and fun that the viewers can relate to. Maybe you attach a clothespin to your ear every time you get a Super Chat. Maybe you have a giant bowling pin and you write their names on the bowling pin whenever they Super Chat.

You can even keep track of a high score of who’s Super Chatted the most out of any viewer ever, maybe like the top five. You can also set up sound effects for certain Super Chats. People love to hear a certain sound effect that’s related to you.

Use Call to Actions

Call to action is extremely important when it comes to Super Chats. I’m not saying to mention it so frequently that your viewers get really frustrated and leave the live stream. I would say every few minutes just mention it. Explain to them why they should use Super Chats, how it helps you, how you’ll read their comments, how you’re gonna write it on this giant bowling pin.

Never force your viewers to you Super Chat. Encouraging them and making it as organic as possible is always gonna be the best way to do it.

The post PrestonPlayz on How to Use Super Chats to Increase YouTube Revenue appeared first on WebProNews.

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PrestonPlayz on How to Use Super Chats to Increase YouTube Revenue

Popular (7.5 million subs) YouTube live streamer PrestonPlayz recently explained the Super Chat feature to all those trying to make money on the YouTube platform:

What is a Super Chat?

A Super Chat is, essentially, a comment that is going to be pinned and highlighted in your live stream chat. Depending on the monetary amount that they Super Chatted, it will change colors and the duration for how long it’s going to be pinned, it could be longer or shorter. I definitely think that Super Chatting gives us and the viewers a really cool way to engage with one another and of course, you can also develop a new source of income for your channel.

Why Super Chat?

You might be thinking why Super Chat? One of the coolest things in my opinion about YouTube is the direct interaction we get to do with our audience, whether you’re a gaming live streamer or live streaming yourself cooking something. It doesn’t matter what you’re doing, you can still engage with your audience. Super Chat does a great job at that.

Super Chat Increases Engagement and Revenue

Super Chat is integrated into YouTube which means it’s extremely accessible for your viewers and very easy to use, not to mention it’s kind of like a domino effect. When one viewer super chats, then another Super Chats, and then another, it catches on like fire and it’s awesome.

Not only is Super Chat a great way to start communicating more with your audience and let them be heard, but of course you can also use it to increase your revenue. I actually ended up using a lot of the super chat revenue that I made to fund other videos, it’s a win-win situation.

Introducing Super Chat to Your Audience

When enabling Super Chats on your channel for the first time I think it’s very important for you to make sure you introduce it to your audience. You should briefly mention it at the beginning of your next live stream saying, “Hey guys I’ve got this new awesome feature Super Chat. If you guys want to support the channel consider sending a Super Chat.” As soon as somebody does the first Super Chat you can show it off… “Guys, that’s the Super Chat, look at the comments right now. This is somebody who’s Super Chatted.”

Now their message is up there for everybody to see. Not only do they get to interact with you but they’re Super Chat is now showcased off to everybody watching the live stream, which I think a lot of viewers really like.

Super Chat Best Practices

Let’s go over some of the best Super Chat practices. Always thank people for their Super Chats no matter how small or large it is. People are much more likely to come back to your future live streams if you engage with their super chat and of course engage with your live stream viewers directly. If possible, depending on the question of the Super chat try to think about some fun ways you can answer it so that way it’s not the same way each and every time.

Think of Fun Ways to Respond

Make sure you’re also noticing them quickly. I’m not saying as soon as they send it you have to read it as fast as you can, but of course the sooner that you can notice them the more appreciated they will feel. It’s also very important to make sure that you’re staying engaged with whatever you are live-streaming about as well as your audience.

Set challenges in your live streams so when you hit a certain tier of Super Chats or a certain amount of Super Chats you’re going to do something. It should be something small, silly, and fun that the viewers can relate to. Maybe you attach a clothespin to your ear every time you get a Super Chat. Maybe you have a giant bowling pin and you write their names on the bowling pin whenever they Super Chat.

You can even keep track of a high score of who’s Super Chatted the most out of any viewer ever, maybe like the top five. You can also set up sound effects for certain Super Chats. People love to hear a certain sound effect that’s related to you.

Use Call to Actions

Call to action is extremely important when it comes to Super Chats. I’m not saying to mention it so frequently that your viewers get really frustrated and leave the live stream. I would say every few minutes just mention it. Explain to them why they should use Super Chats, how it helps you, how you’ll read their comments, how you’re gonna write it on this giant bowling pin.

Never force your viewers to you Super Chat. Encouraging them and making it as organic as possible is always gonna be the best way to do it.

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The Nitty Gritty Tips On How To Get YouTube Views and Drive Business

Every business should be using YouTube to engage their potential customers and create a sense of authority for their business. The problem is that most people don’t know where to start and don’t know how the YourTube algorithm works, so they serious make mistakes.

Internet marketing expert Neil Patel along with YouTube branding expert Adam LoDolce, founder of Viewership.com, recently provided the answers that every business needs to expertly use YouTube to communicate with their potential customers.

Below are some highlights:

You want to get more traffic from YouTube, there are a few things you need to do. One, check out vidIQ, it’s an amazing tool, it’ll help you out. However, YouTube marketing is not rocket science, similar to SEO. Yes, there are a lot of little components, but if you do them, you can do well.

Include the Right Keywords

The first one is, include the right keywords. Similar to how you do keyword research for SEO, you want to do keyword research for YouTube. Suggested apps are vidIQ, Adwords keyword planner tool and Ubersuggest which pulls from Adwords and Google Suggest and YouTube. If you just do that you will get more recommendations on keywords that will drive more traffic.

Have a Very Appealing Title

Another thing you want to do is have a really appealing title, one that evokes curiosity. Just having the keywords in there isn’t enough. If your title doesn’t evoke curiosity, people aren’t going to click through, play and then continue watching. That’s really the biggest difference between YouTube and Google Search. With Google Search, people are searching for it, whereas on YouTube, most traffic isn’t search traffic, it’s people who click on your videos from browse features and suggested videos.

It has to be really good, I don’t want to say clickbait, but it has to be click-worthy for you to get a lot of traffic. When you watch a video on YouTube they’ll recommend other videos or autoplay other videos from other channels. If your video is really good and somebody is watching it, in the sidebar, somebody may see your video and click on it. But if your title is not appealing they’re not going to really click on it.

You Have to Upload Transcriptions

In addition to that, you have to upload transcriptions. We suggest Rev.com where you can pay a dollar per minute for a transcription. What that does is when you upload it to YouTube it’ll tell them what your content is about. Yes, YouTube can auto-transcribe your content, but it doesn’t hold the same weight versus if you uploaded an SRT file or a transcription, and that’s what Rev.com provides.

Increase Engagement With Advertising

If your a business and want to get your videos in front of a lot of people on YouTube, then you should use advertisement to push those videos in front of people who have liked or commented on previous videos. The reason why this is so effective is that it is going to get much more engagement on the new videos that you produce, and YouTube loves engagement.

YouTube, like Google, is looking at the authority of your channel and engagement feeds this algorithm. If you have a lot of videos that are doing well it boosts the overall authority of your whole channel, and all of your videos will start doing better. The worst thing you can do is have all these videos out there with no likes, no comments, nothing going on.

Key Tips for Producing a Video

One of the biggest things Adam LoDolce taught me (noted Neil Patel) when I was learning about YouTube marketing, was all about how to produce the video. I’m not talking about the editing, I’m talking about your personality and how you create your own video.

The biggest one is how you want your audience to feel. A lot of people think about keyword topics and that’s nice for your research, but ultimately, it’s about how do you want them to feel. Do you want them to be motivated, or do you want them to laugh?

For your business channel, the worst thing you can do is to be very stiff, professional and to just give tactical advice. Loosen up a little bit, have a little fun, make a joke, that’s how you can get engagement with your videos. If you are not having fun recording, I bet you the person watching is not going to have fun.

Your videos need to be a decent length. YouTube’s looking at how long are you keeping people on YouTube! The more you keep them on YouTube, instead of driving them back to your website, the better. Everyone likes putting those captions in videos, like click this link, head back over to my website. That will hurt your YouTube ratings versus just keeping people on YouTube.

Think of it more as a branding channel, and when you are creating a video that doesn’t mean you need to create an hour video, but typically anything about 5 or 6 minutes is good. Any short videos of 2-3 minutes is just going to hurt you versus creating 5-10 minute videos.

Video is the Future

If you are a business and not doing any video, you are missing out. If you can start doing it and start getting more comfortable with it, push your comfort zone and get in front of the camera, you are going to have a competitive advantage out there.

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Dan And Brandon: How The Founders Of Zen Dude Fitness Make A Full Time Income Sharing Jump Rope Videos On YouTube

[ Download MP3 | Transcript | iTunes | Soundcloud | Raw RSS ] Dan and Brandon became best friends after a podcast interview led to the realization that they live in the same building. The two guys have a lot in common, including having played the same position for their college…

The post Dan And Brandon: How The Founders Of Zen Dude Fitness Make A Full Time Income Sharing Jump Rope Videos On YouTube appeared first on Yaro.blog.

Entrepreneurs-Journey.com by Yaro Starak

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Search Buzz Video Recap: Google Algorithm Changes, Bing AMP & JSON-LD, Google & YouTube Spam & Matt Cutts

This week we have a lot to cover, first an algorithmic change in the Google search results over last weekend throughout this whole week. Bing announced a new AMP viewer coming this summer, they also announced JSON-LD support in Bing Webmaster Tools…


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Beyond Youtube: Video Hosting, Marketing, and Monetization Platforms, Compared

Posted by AnnSmarty

A few weeks ago I did a step-by-step article on building up your YouTube presence. When writing the article, I immediately had a follow-up idea on expanding my tips beyond YouTube. Since then, some of the comments have confirmed the need for this follow-up.

The increasing interest in video marketing and diversifying your efforts is not surprising: According to HubSpot’s research 45% of web users watch an hour or more of video per day. That’s a lot if time our customers spend watching videos! And it’s projected that by 2020, 82% of all consumer web traffic will be video.

Obviously, if you are seriously entering the video marketing arena, limiting yourself to YouTube alone is not a smart idea, just like limiting yourself to any one marketing channel is probably never a good way to go.

With that in mind, what other options do we have?

More video hosting options

YouTube is not the only major video hosting platform out there. There are a few solid options that you want to consider. Here are three additional platforms and how they fit different needs:

YouTube

Vimeo Pro

Vimeo Business

Wistia

Cost

Free

$ 20 /m

$ 50 /m

$ 99 /m

What’s included

Unlimited videos

20GB per week

5TB per week

10 videos a month

Lead generation

No

No

Yes

Yes

Customizable player

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Collaboration

No

No

Yes

No

Publish native to Facebook & Twitter

No

Yes

Yes

No

Clickable links

No(*)

Yes

Yes

Yes

Domain-level privacy

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Analytics

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes (**)

Video schema

No

No

No

Yes

Customer support

No(*)

Yes

Yes

Yes

Cons

Crowded, no good way to send viewers to your site…

Often has issues with bandwidth; videos load slower. If you are looking for organic visibility, it’s quite niche-specific (artists, etc.)

Most expensive

Best for

Anyone

Filmmakers

Agencies

Businesses

  • (*) Unless you become a YouTube Partner (which is next to impossible for new and medium-scale channels)
  • (**) I (as well as many reviewers) consider Wistia analytics much better than that of YouTube and Vimeo

Bottom line:

Choosing a video hosting platform is overwhelming but here are a few easy-to-digest takeaways from the above comparison:

  • YouTube is beyond competition. If you are into video marketing, you need to be there, at least for the sake of being discovered through their search and suggested videos. However, a YouTube account is only good for promoting the YouTube account. There’s little chance to drive leads to your site or build solid income there. You do need to be there for branding, though. Besides, none of the other options will offer an opportunity for such a powerful organic spread.
  • If you are into creative film-making (artists and storytellers), you’ll want to give Vimeo Pro a try. There’s a big community there and you want to be part of it to find partners/clients.
  • If you are a video marketing agency, Vimeo Business may be your platform of choice (thanks to their collaboration and multi-user support)
  • If you mostly need videos to embed on your landing pages, Wistia will save you tons of time. It’s the easiest to use and understand. No extra training needed. You don’t have to be an experienced filmmaker OR marketer to understand how it works and use its analytics.

Video courses and on-demand video

These days, anyone can create their own on-demand video channel. Isn’t it awesome? It’s also a very smart way to monetize your videos without forcing your viewers into clicking any ads or buying any affiliate stuff you didn’t create.

When consolidating your video marketing efforts into your own on-demand video channel, there are important goals to keep in mind (targeting at least several at a time being the smartest approach):

  • Creating a knowledge base around your product
  • Positioning your brand as a knowledge hub in your niche
  • Building up an additional conversion funnel (for those people who are not ready to buy yet)

To me, creating a video subscription channel seems to be a perfect way to monetize your video creation efforts for two very appealing reasons:

  1. You create a product of your own which you are able to sell. With that comes an ocean of opportunities, from enhanced branding to an ability to expand your reach to many more platforms where you can sell your product from.
  2. You build and nurture your own micro-community, which (if you do things right) are able to spread your word, refer more people to join and support you in your other endeavors.

With that in mind, which options do we have to create our own video course?

Not surprisingly, there are quite a few platforms that fall into two major groups:

  • Revenue sharing platforms. The power of those is that they are interested in selling your courses and there’s usually a community to market your course to. That benefit also creates one major drawback: Expect these platforms to dictate you how to format and market your course. Udemy is the best known example here: I started using it mostly for branding and quickly got discouraged due to their multiple restrictions and poor customer support. Still, it’s a good place to start.
  • VOD (video-on-demand) platforms. These will charge you a monthly fee but they will come with awesome marketing features and integrations, as well as total freedom as to what you want to do with your content and your audience. Like with anything, you get what you pay for.Uscreen is a big player here: You can choose your payment model, use your own domain, brand your course the way you want to, send email marketing emails to your students, and even create a custom smart phone app to give your students an alternative on-the-go way to consume your brand-owned content:

Uscreen course

Bottom line:

Like with video marketing platforms, there’s nothing preventing you from using both of the above options (for example, you can sell a lighter version of your course on Udemy and keep a more advanced, regularly updated version for your own domain) but just to give you an idea:

  • Udemy is best if you are very new to course creation and have no budget to start. It also makes it easy to keep an eye on competitors and understand your audience better by watching what and how they rate and review
  • Uscreen is a logical step further: Once you get more comfortable and have accumulated some videos you may want to bring it to the next level, i.e. create your own branded spot to engage your community better and build an alternative source of income.

Live streaming

Live streaming refers recording and simultaneously broadcasting your video to your audience in real time.

Live streaming has been getting bigger for a few years now and there’s nothing that would signal an upcoming slow-down.

The biggest players here are:

  • YouTube Live
  • Facebook Live
  • Periscope

All the above options are very interactive and engaging: You can see your viewers’ comments and reactions as you are streaming the video and you are able to address them right away.

In this case, your choice depends on your own marketing background: Stick to whatever channel currently works best for you in terms of follower/subscriber base and engagement.

Personally, Facebook is my preferred way to stream videos, not because of the actual audience size but because Facebook audience is more engaged. Besides, Facebook sends a notification to my friends whenever I go live which always results in more views.

But it’s possible that we don’t have to choose…

There are a couple of services that claim to stream “simultaneously” to several of the major platforms which is something I haven’t tried yet but I am definitely planning to. If you like the idea, here’s what I have been able to find so far:

Vimeo Live

Crowdcast Multistreams

Supported platforms

“Vimeo and Facebook, YouTube, or your favorite RTMP destinations”

“Facebook Live, Periscope, YouTube Live, and more”

Cost

$ 75 per month

$ 89 per month

Extra Pros

Comes with all Vimeo Business features (analytics, collaboration, hosting, etc.)

Comes with nice webinar hosting features

More tools to amplify your video marketing

In my previous article I listed lots of video creation and marketing tools and I didn’t want to leave you with no tools here as well.

If you have read up to this point, you must be very serious about your video marketing efforts. So to award you, here are a few awesome tools you may want to take note of:

Create: Lumen5

Here’s a nice tool I failed to mention in my previous post: Lumen5. If you are looking for an easy start for your video marketing campaign, take a look at this tool. It turns blog posts into videos and the result is pretty awesome.

lumen5

I don’t mean to say this tool is enough for a well-rounded video marketing campaign but it’s definitely a nice way to re-package your text content and broadcast your articles to video-only channels, like Youtube and Vimeo.

Monetize: Patreon

Apart from selling your videos as a separate project, there’s another cool way to monetize your video activity.

Patreon is nice platform aiming to help independent video creators: Set up your page and invite your social media followers to support your video creation efforts by a small monthly subscription. If you don’t want to sell anything, that’s a nice way to earn your living by engaging your supporters:

patreon

You can learn more on how it works from its current user here.

Monitor: Awario

There’s never one perfect method of doing marketing. There’s always a need to try different tools, formats and platforms. Monitoring your competitors is one great way to discover more of those tactics to play with.

Awario is a great solution to use for competitive multi-channel monitoring. They support all major media including Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Reddit, blogs and more. You can easily filter out any channel to clear out clutter. YouTube monitoring is a life saver when it comes to keeping an eye on what your competitor is doing video-wise:

awario

When it comes to video marketing, I am not aware of any other solution for monitoring video content.

Conclusion

  • You don’t have to limit yourself to YouTube for video hosting, but you cannot really do without YouTube altogether.
  • When it comes to YouTube, it’s a powerful video discovery engine but there’s not much you can do to direct those viewers to your own site. You need to be there to be discovered, though.
  • When it comes to other video hosting platforms, every solution serves its own purpose, so choose one that will serve your needs best.
  • If you want to consolidate your video marketing efforts (which is a smart and logical step further), create your own on-demand video channel. These days it’s pretty easy and affordable.
  • Video live streaming is a great way to earn organic social media visibility. Choose your platform to stream based on your current level of engagement and reach. Or, try paid solutions that allow to stream to multiple platforms simultaneously

Are there more tools and platforms you are using? Let us know in the comments!

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Antonio Centeno: How This US Marine Turned Entrepreneur Earns Over $1 Million Teaching Men How To Dress Better Using YouTube

[ Download MP3 | Transcript | iTunes | Soundcloud | Raw RSS ] I met Antonio Centeno at the first ever Youpreneur conference in London, hosted by Chris Ducker. Antonio was seated next to me, one of the only men dressed in a suit, and we immediately struck up a…

The post Antonio Centeno: How This US Marine Turned Entrepreneur Earns Over $ 1 Million Teaching Men How To Dress Better Using YouTube appeared first on Yaro.blog.

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