Tag Archive | "they"

These 4 Copywriting Techniques Work Really Well … Right Up Until They Don’t

Search on Google and you’ll find hundreds of thousands of pages devoted to copywriting secrets, tips, tricks, and techniques. Go…

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Greg Smith: Founder Of Canadian Tech Startup Thinkific Explains How They Used MVPs To Build A Hugely Successful Subscription Software Company

 [ Download MP3 | Transcript | iTunes | Soundcloud | Raw RSS ] One of the hottest business models in the tech startup world is anything with a recurring subscription business model, especially if it’s software based. Another hot online business model for talented individuals who want to make money from their knowledge, is […]

The post Greg Smith: Founder Of Canadian Tech Startup Thinkific Explains How They Used MVPs To Build A Hugely Successful Subscription Software Company appeared first on Yaro.Blog.

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Greg Smith: Founder Of Canadian Tech Startup Thinkific Explains How They Used MVPs To Build A Hugely Successful Subscription Software Company

 [ Download MP3 | Transcript | iTunes | Soundcloud | Raw RSS ] One of the hottest business models in the tech startup world is anything with a recurring subscription business model, especially if it’s software based. Another hot online business model for talented individuals who want to make money from their knowledge, is […]

The post Greg Smith: Founder Of Canadian Tech Startup Thinkific Explains How They Used MVPs To Build A Hugely Successful Subscription Software Company appeared first on Yaro.Blog.

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When Bounce Rate, Browse Rate (PPV), and Time-on-Site Are Useful Metrics… and When They Aren’t – Whiteboard Friday

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When is it right to use metrics like bounce rate, pages per visit, and time on site? When are you better off ignoring them? There are endless opinions on whether these kinds of metrics are valuable or not, and as you might suspect, the answer is found in the shades of grey. Learn what Rand has to say about the great metrics debate in today’s episode of Whiteboard Friday.

When bounce rate browse rate and ppc are useful metrics and when they suck

Click on the whiteboard image above to open a high-resolution version in a new tab!

Video Transcription

Howdy, Moz fans, and welcome to another edition of Whiteboard Friday. This week we’re chatting about times at which bounce rate, browse rate, which is pages per visit, and time on site are terrible metrics and when they’re actually quite useful metrics.

This happens quite a bit. I see in the digital marketing world people talking about these metrics as though they are either dirty-scum, bottom-of-the-barrel metrics that no one should pay any attention to, or that they are these lofty, perfect metrics that are what we should be optimizing for. Neither of those is really accurate. As is often the case, the truth usually lies somewhere in between.

So, first off, some credit to Wil Reynolds, who brought this up during a discussion that I had with him at Siege Media’s offices, an interview that Ross Hudgens put together with us, and Sayf Sharif from Seer Interactive, their Director of Analytics, who left an awesome comment about this discussion on the LinkedIn post of that video. We’ll link to those in this Whiteboard Friday.

So Sayf and Wil were both basically arguing that these are kind of crap metrics. We don’t trust them. We don’t use them a lot. I think, a lot of the time, that makes sense.

Instances when these metrics aren’t useful

Here’s when these metrics, that bounce rate, pages per visit, and time on site kind of suck.

1. When they’re used instead of conversion actions to represent “success”

So they suck when you use them instead of conversion actions. So a conversion is someone took an action that I wanted on my website. They filled in a form. They purchased a product. They put in their credit card. Whatever it is, they got to a page that I wanted them to get to.

Bounce rate is basically the average percent of people who landed on a page and then left your website, not to continue on any other page on that site after visiting that page.

Pages per visit is essentially exactly what it sounds like, the average number of pages per visit for people who landed on that particular page. So people who came in through one of these pages, how many pages did they visit on my site.

Then time on site is essentially a very raw and rough metric. If I leave my computer to use the restroom or I basically switch to another tab or close my browser, it’s not necessarily the case that time on site ends right then. So this metric has a lot of imperfections. Now, averaged over time, it can still be directionally interesting.

But when you use these instead of conversion actions, which is what we all should be optimizing for ultimately, you can definitely get into some suckage with these metrics.

2. When they’re compared against non-relevant “competitors” and other sites

When you compare them against non-relevant competitors, so when you compare, for example, a product-focused, purchase-focused site against a media-focused site, you’re going to get big differences. First off, if your pages per visit look like a media site’s pages per visit and you’re product-focused, that is crazy. Either the media site is terrible or you’re doing something absolutely amazing in terms of keeping people’s attention and energy.

Time on site is a little bit misleading in this case too, because if you look at the time on site, again, of a media property or a news-focused, content-focused site versus one that’s very e-commerce focused, you’re going to get vastly different things. Amazon probably wants your time on site to be pretty small. Dell wants your time on site to be pretty small. Get through the purchase process, find the computer you want, buy it, get out of here. If you’re taking 10 minutes to do that or 20 minutes to do that instead of 5, we’ve failed. We haven’t provided a good enough experience to get you quickly through the purchase funnel. That can certainly be the case. So there can be warring priorities inside even one of these metrics.

3. When they’re not considered over time or with traffic sources factored in

Third, you get some suckage when they are not considered over time or against the traffic sources that brought them in. For example, if someone visits a web page via a Twitter link, chances are really good, really, really good, especially on mobile, that they’re going to have a high bounce rate, a low number of pages per visit, and a low time on site. That’s just how Twitter behavior is. Facebook is quite similar.

Now, if they’ve come via a Google search, an informational Google search and they’ve clicked on an organic listing, you should see just the reverse. You should see a relatively good bounce rate. You should see a relatively good pages per visit, well, a relatively higher pages per visit, a relatively higher time on site.

Instances when these metrics are useful

1. When they’re used as diagnostics for the conversion funnel

So there’s complexity inside these metrics for sure. What we should be using them for, when these metrics are truly useful is when they are used as a diagnostic. So when you look at a conversion funnel and you see, okay, our conversion funnel looks like this, people come in through the homepage or through our blog or news sections, they eventually, we hope, make it to our product page, our pricing page, and our conversion page.

We have these metrics for all of these. When we make changes to some of these, significant changes, minor changes, we don’t just look at how conversion performs. We also look at whether things like time on site shrank or whether people had fewer pages per visit or whether they had a higher bounce rate from some of these sections.

So perhaps, for example, we changed our pricing and we actually saw that people spent less time on the pricing page and had about the same number of pages per visit and about the same bounce rate from the pricing page. At the same time, we saw conversions dip a little bit.

Should we intuit that pricing negatively affected our conversion rate? Well, perhaps not. Perhaps we should look and see if there were other changes made or if our traffic sources were in there, because it looks like, given that bounce rate didn’t increase, given that pages per visit didn’t really change, given that time on site actually went down a little bit, it seems like people are making it just fine through the pricing page. They’re making it just fine from this pricing page to the conversion page, so let’s look at something else.

This is the type of diagnostics that you can do when you have metrics at these levels. If you’ve seen a dip in conversions or a rise, this is exactly the kind of dig into the data that smart, savvy digital marketers should and can be doing, and I think it’s a powerful, useful tool to be able to form hypotheses based on what happens.

So again, another example, did we change this product page? We saw pages per visit shrink and time on site shrink. Did it affect conversion rate? If it didn’t, but then we see that we’re getting fewer engaged visitors, and so now we can’t do as much retargeting and we’re losing email signups, maybe this did have a negative effect and we should go back to the other one, even if conversion rate itself didn’t seem to take a particular hit in this case.

2. When they’re compared over time to see if internal changes or external forces shifted behavior

Second useful way to apply these metrics is compared over time to see if your internal changes or some external forces shifted behavior. For example, we can look at the engagement rate on the blog. The blog is tough to generate as a conversion event. We could maybe look at subscriptions, but in general, pages per visit is a nice one for the blog. It tells us whether people make it past the page they landed on and into deeper sections, stick around our site, check out what we do.

So if we see that it had a dramatic fall down here in April and that was when we installed a new author and now they’re sort of recovering, we can say, “Oh, yeah, you know what? That takes a little while for a new blog author to kind of come up to speed. We’re going to give them time,” or, “Hey, we should interject here. We need to jump in and try and fix whatever is going on.”

3. When they’re benchmarked versus relevant industry competitors

Third and final useful case is when you benchmark versus truly relevant industry competitors. So if you have a direct competitor, very similar focus to you, product-focused in this case with a homepage and then some content sections and then a very focused product checkout, you could look at you versus them and their homepage and your homepage.

If you could get the data from a source like SimilarWeb or Jumpshot, if there’s enough clickstream level data, or some savvy industry surveys that collect this information, and you see that you’re significantly higher, you might then take a look at what are they doing that we’re not doing. Maybe we should use them when we do our user research and say, “Hey, what’s compelling to you about this that maybe is missing here?”

Otherwise, a lot of the time people will take direct competitors and say, “Hey, let’s look at what our competition is doing and we’ll consider that best practice.” But if you haven’t looked at how they’re performing, how people are getting through, whether they’re engaging, whether they’re spending time on that site, whether they’re making it through their different pages, you don’t know if they actually are best practices or whether you’re about to follow a laggard’s example and potentially hurt yourself.

So definitely a complex topic, definitely many, many different things that go into the uses of these metrics, and there are some bad and good ways to use them. I agree with Sayf and with Wil, but I think there are also some great ways to apply them. I would love to hear from you if you’ve got examples of those down in the comments. We’ll see you again next week for another edition of Whiteboard Friday. Take care.

Video transcription by Speechpad.com

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My Four Failed Businesses And How They Led To Over 10 Years Of Success

I recently posted a message to the members of my Laptop Lifestyle Academy asking them what their most common concerns were when it comes to succeeding with their online business. I received a bunch of replies and one of the repeating themes were issues related to mindset, especially in the face of…

The post My Four Failed Businesses And How They Led To Over 10 Years Of Success appeared first on Yaro.blog.

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My Four Failed Businesses And How They Led To Over 10 Years Of Success

I recently posted a message to the members of my Laptop Lifestyle Academy asking them what their most common concerns were when it comes to succeeding with their online business. I received a bunch of replies and one of the repeating themes were issues related to mindset, especially in the face of…

The post My Four Failed Businesses And How They Led To Over 10 Years Of Success appeared first on Yaro.blog.

Entrepreneurs-Journey.com by Yaro Starak

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They Won’t Bite: How talking to customers helped Dell EMC turn its content strategy around

Taking the time to pause production and speak with our customers about the kind of content they want to see is one of those “why didn’t we do this sooner?” moments we talk about so much in marketing.
The Dell EMC had just such a moment. It stopped producing content that was seeing absolutely no traction and began not only focusing on content that customers actually wanted but also getting it in front of them.
Watch this Media Center interview with Lindsay Lyons, Director of Global Content Strategy, Dell EMC, to gain insights into how her team was able to transform their internal processes to produce effective, customer-first content.

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Pet Peeves from the Copyblogger Editorial Team, and What they Reveal

"No one can nurse a good peeve quite like a group of writers." – Sonia Simone

We’ve written quite a bit lately about identifying core values in your content.

Creating content around a positive value like integrity, fairness, humility, or faith will attract an audience that shares those values — and that fosters a powerful sense of unity.

But our friend negativity bias tells us that the flip side of that will probably be more compelling. In other words, talking about the things that bug you will build an even faster bond with your audience.

For today’s post, I asked our editorial team to let us know their peeves — the things that irritate, bother, and annoy them.

I’m going to try to tease those out and figure out the values behind them — and see what that might say about who we are as a company and a community.

So let’s get peevy.

Stefanie Flaxman’s peeve

Stefanie is our editor-in-chief, and as you’d expect, she has a healthy list of grammar and usage peeves.

But an editor is much more than a proofreader. It’s one thing to misplace a comma — it’s another to come at a post in a fundamentally flawed way. Here’s Stefanie’s peeve:

Hype/extremes/absolutes: Writing voices that are heavy on absolutes tend to simultaneously lack substance and speak to the reader as if they know what’s best for them … which isn’t a combination that builds credibility.

For example, earnestly referring to any flesh-and-blood human being as a “guru” is typically too vague or a sign of hype. If the person is an expert, top scholar, or highly respected professional, use those labels instead — they’re more specific.

What it reveals

Putting this post together reminded me that an Allergy to Hype has always been at the core of Copyblogger’s message. Since Brian founded the blog in 2008, Copyblogger has always stood in contrast to the hype-slingers who substitute flash for value. We believe that substance matters.

Robert Bruce’s peeve

Ten-dollar words: This is an old one, but a good one, and for good reason. Most writers have moderate-to-severe mental problems. I am, obviously, no psychologist, but the attempt to unnecessarily project one’s “intelligence” through the use of big words — when plain words can do the job — seems to be clear evidence of this.

What it reveals

Besides the obvious fact that Robert wins a lifetime “get off my lawn” achievement award, I think this shows how passionate we are about Quality. Quality of information, quality of business practices, quality of writing.

Loryn Thompson’s peeve

You’ve only seen Loryn on the blog once (so far), but she’s crucial to our editorial success. She’s the data analyst who looks at the numbers behind what we’re writing, and helps us to get our message out more effectively.

Here’s Loryn’s peeve:

Using “over” with numbers (instead of “more than”) : As Rainmaker Digital’s data analyst, this one comes up for me a lot. Every time I catch myself writing “over 5%…” in a report, I go back and change it to “more than.” 

 

Now, the Associated Press said in 2014 that both “over” and “more than” are acceptable to use with numeric comparisons — as in, “There were over two hundred people at the event.” But you know what? It still bugs the crap out of me. 

In my mind, “over” mixes the abstract world with the physical realm. For example, if you were to say, “We flew over 6,000 miles …” you could be saying that you flew more than 6,000 miles. Or, you might mean that you were literally above the earth for 6,000 miles.

What it reveals

I picked this one precisely because the team doesn’t agree on it. Some of us are “more than” folks (me, Loryn) and some aren’t. Stefanie tries to remain agnostic.

While it can be fun to give in to that eye twitch when someone makes a style choice we don’t like, I think it’s smart to keep some perspective. There are usually good arguments to be made for different usage choices, so I’ll go with Diversity as a value for this one.

My take is that it’s more important to be thoughtful about your choices than it is to be didactic. Although alot is never going to be a word and you can’t make it one.

Twitch, twitch.

Jerod Morris’s peeve

Jerod’s a person with a strong moral compass, and I was interested to see his peeves. Here’s the one I chose from his:

Misspellings of names: It’s especially bad when the name is a common one that’s misspelled in an obvious way. But any name misspelling shows a lack of basic respect for the subject you’re writing about. It’s not really grammar, but it still makes me cringe. Find out for sure.

What it reveals

Misspelling a name in content is a classic example in failure of what Jerod calls Primility (the intersection between pride and humility). It’s both sloppy (lack of pride) and disrespectful (lack of humility). I think it’s fair to say that Primility is a core value for Jerod, and that’s probably one of the reasons he’s been such a great asset to our company.

We are, make no mistake, proud of the work we do at Copyblogger. We love producing the blog, and we try hard to make it excellent. But we know that humility’s important, too. We’re under no illusion that this blog is perfect, and we try to challenge each other to always make it more relevant, more useful, and more interesting.

Sonia Simone’s peeve

You may feel like you already know more than you need to about my peeves. For today, I revisited a favorite:

Boring content: This one just makes me sad … seeing site after site after site that utterly fails to stand out in any way.

When I see a site with a genuine, passionate voice — even if there are a few usage errors — I may cringe a little, but mostly I cheer. I’d much rather see a site with plenty of G.A.S. than a grammatically perfect one that has no soul.

What it reveals

Individuality is absolutely a core value at Copyblogger. We’ve never endorsed the paint-by-numbers approach to marketing and online business … partly because that would be very boring, and mostly because it just doesn’t work.

And then there’s the Oxford comma

If you aren’t familiar with the Oxford comma (also known as the serial comma), it’s that final comma in a collection of items in a sentence.

Here’s a visually amusing example of the same sentence with and without one.

I like the Oxford comma because it’s always clear. Jerod gets downright fierce about his support. That renegade Loryn, though, has come to prefer dropping it.

“I used to be a staunch Oxford Comma advocate, but now I prefer the way short lists flow without it.” – That Renegade Loryn

Either is correct, but do be consistent. (Although the late Bill Walsh, noted Washington Post usage stickler, advises that if a serial comma is important for clarity, go ahead and put one in there, even if it’s not your usual style.)

A note about peeves and unity

I mentioned when we started that talking about the negatives will build a connection with your audience more quickly — and it will. But keep in mind that a steady diet of negativity will give almost anyone indigestion.

Don’t shy away from talking about the good stuff, too. An honest values system includes both positive and negative points of view.

How about you?

What sets your teeth on edge when you see it in a blog post or hear it in a podcast? What do you think that says about you and your values?

Let us know in the comments!

The post Pet Peeves from the Copyblogger Editorial Team, and What they Reveal appeared first on Copyblogger.


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Trump Has Made Twitter Relevant Again — Twitter Should be Ecstatic — Instead They Are Conflicted — Blinded by Political Bias

Up until the campaign, Twitter was in my opinion fading from public consciousness, with Facebook starting to dominate as the place to go for breaking news. Trump single handedly changed that. Twitter is on top of the world with every news network, at the top of every TV news broadcast it seems they are referencing a tweet by President Elect Donald Trump.

Every company in the world would love this free attention, except maybe Twitter itself. Why, because they are a collective of leftists run by an extremely leftist CEO Jack Dorsey. They are at the cutting edge of banning those they disagree with, such as Breitbart reporter and gay conservative libertarian nationalist activist Milo Yiannopoulos. Twitter permanently banned MILO in July 2016 for what the company cited as “inciting or engaging in the targeted abuse or harassment of others.”

There are numerous other bans of conservatives and it’s clear that Twitter bans conservatives with one standard and leftist with another. For instance, BlackLivesMatters, which makes pro-communist tweets, says fuck capitalism, says police are dangerous and tells kids not to trust them and calls ex-Breitbart CEO and primary Trump advisor a white nationalist without any evidence… is alive and well on Twitter.

The question is… Is Twitter a business anymore, or just another leftist political site? If it is, then it needs to take legal responsibility for ALL posts from its users. If it’s going to edit out political speech from those it disagrees, then it’s starting to move into the territory of being a news site rather than a platform. Right?

At the Recode conference yesterday, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey said per the Guardian:

Asked how he felt about Trump’s use of the service, Dorsey said: “Complicated”.

“I feel very proud of the role of the service and what it stands for and everything that we’ve done, and that continues to accelerate every single day. Especially as it’s had such a spotlight on it through his usage and through the election.”

It sounds as if he really meant… Conflicted. Conflicted by his and his employees leftist views at possibly (eventually) the expense of his companies shareholders?

Can you imagine if Twitter banned a President Trump? I can.

The post Trump Has Made Twitter Relevant Again — Twitter Should be Ecstatic — Instead They Are Conflicted — Blinded by Political Bias appeared first on WebProNews.


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I Examined All My Successful Clients And Found One Behavior They All Share

Back in 2012 I wrote an email to a special group of people. The message was sent to all my past coaching members, everyone who had joined at least one of the three flagship courses I taught during 2007 to 2011. My question was simple: I wanted to know who…

The post I Examined All My Successful Clients And Found One Behavior They All Share appeared first on Entrepreneurs-Journey.com.

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