Tag Archive | "Prospecting"

NEW On-Demand Crawl: Quick Insights for Sales, Prospecting, & Competitive Analysis

Posted by Dr-Pete

In June of 2017, Moz launched our entirely rebuilt Site Crawl, helping you dive deep into crawl issues and technical SEO problems, fix those issues in your Moz Pro Campaigns (tracked websites), and monitor weekly for new issues. Many times, though, you need quick insights outside of a Campaign context, whether you’re analyzing a prospect site before a sales call or trying to assess the competition.

For years, Moz had a lab tool called Crawl Test. The bad news is that Crawl Test never made it to prime-time and suffered from some neglect. The good news is that I’m happy to announce the full launch (as of August 2018) of On-Demand Crawl, an entirely new crawl tool built on the engine that powers Site Crawl, but with a UI designed around quick insights for prospecting and competitive analysis.

While you don’t need a Campaign to run a crawl, you do need to be logged into your Moz Pro subscription. If you don’t have a subscription, you can sign-up for a free trial and give it a whirl.

How can you put On-Demand Crawl to work? Let’s walk through a short example together.


All you need is a domain

Getting started is easy. From the “Moz Pro” menu, find “On-Demand Crawl” under “Research Tools”:

Just enter a root domain or subdomain in the box at the top and click the blue button to kick off a crawl. While I don’t want to pick on anyone, I’ve decided to use a real site. Our recent analysis of the August 1st Google update identified some sites that were hit hard, and I’ve picked one (lilluna.com) from that list.

Please note that Moz is not affiliated with Lil’ Luna in any way. For the most part, it seems to be a decent site with reasonably good content. Let’s pretend, just for this post, that you’re looking to help this site out and determine if they’d be a good fit for your SEO services. You’ve got a call scheduled and need to spot-check for any major problems so that you can go into that call as informed as possible.

On-Demand Crawls aren’t instantaneous (crawling is a big job), but they’ll generally finish between a few minutes and an hour. We know these are time-sensitive situations. You’ll soon receive an email that looks like this:

The email includes the number of URLs crawled (On-Demand will currently crawl up to 3,000 URLs), the total issues found, and a summary table of crawl issues by category. Click on the [View Report] link to dive into the full crawl data.


Assess critical issues quickly

We’ve designed On-Demand Crawl to assist your own human intelligence. You’ll see some basic stats at the top, but then immediately move into a graph of your top issues by count. The graph only displays issues that occur at least once on your site – you can click “See More” to show all of the issues that On-Demand Crawl tracks (the top two bars have been truncated)…

Issues are also color-coded by category. Some items are warnings, and whether they matter depends a lot on context. Other issues, like “Critcal Errors” (in red) almost always demand attention. So, let’s check out those 404 errors. Scroll down and you’ll see a list of “Pages Crawled” with filters. You’re going to select “4xx” in the “Status Codes” dropdown…

You can then pretty easily spot-check these URLs and find out that they do, in fact, seem to be returning 404 errors. Some appear to be legitimate content that has either internal or external links (or both). So, within a few minutes, you’ve already found something useful.

Let’s look at those yellow “Meta Noindex” errors next. This is a tricky one, because you can’t easily determine intent. An intentional Meta Noindex may be fine. An unintentional one (or hundreds of unintentional ones) could be blocking crawlers and causing serious harm. Here, you’ll filter by issue type…

Like the top graph, issues appear in order of prevalence. You can also filter by all pages that have issues (any issues) or pages that have no issues. Here’s a sample of what you get back (the full table also includes status code, issue count, and an option to view all issues)…

Notice the “?s=” common to all of these URLs. Clicking on a few, you can see that these are internal search pages. These URLs have no particular SEO value, and the Meta Noindex is likely intentional. Good technical SEO is also about avoiding false alarms because you lack internal knowledge of a site. On-Demand Crawl helps you semi-automate and summarize insights to put your human intelligence to work quickly.


Dive deeper with exports

Let’s go back to those 404s. Ideally, you’d like to know where those URLs are showing up. We can’t fit everything into one screen, but if you scroll up to the “All Issues” graph you’ll see an “Export CSV” option…

The export will honor any filters set in the page list, so let’s re-apply that “4xx” filter and pull the data. Your export should download almost immediately. The full export contains a wealth of information, but I’ve zeroed in on just what’s critical for this particular case…

Now, you know not only what pages are missing, but exactly where they link from internally, and can easily pass along suggested fixes to the customer or prospect. Some of these turn out to be link-heavy pages that could probably benefit from some clean-up or updating (if newer recipes are a good fit).

Let’s try another one. You’ve got 8 duplicate content errors. Potentially thin content could fit theories about the August 1st update, so this is worth digging into. If you filter by “Duplicate Content” issues, you’ll see the following message…

The 8 duplicate issues actually represent 18 pages, and the table returns all 18 affected pages. In some cases, the duplicates will be obvious from the title and/or URL, but in this case there’s a bit of mystery, so let’s pull that export file. In this case, there’s a column called “Duplicate Content Group,” and sorting by it reveals something like the following (there’s a lot more data in the original export file)…

I’ve renamed “Duplicate Content Group” to just “Group” and included the word count (“Words”), which could be useful for verifying true duplicates. Look at group #7 – it turns out that these “Weekly Menu Plan” pages are very image heavy and have a common block of text before any unique text. While not 100% duplicated, these otherwise valuable pages could easily look like thin content to Google and represent a broader problem.


Real insights in real-time

Not counting the time spent writing the blog post, running this crawl and diving in took less than an hour, and even that small amount of time spent uncovered more potential issues than what I could cover in this post. In less than an hour, you can walk into a client meeting or sales call with in-depth knowledge of any domain.

Keep in mind that many of these features also exist in our Site Crawl tool. If you’re looking for long-term, campaign insights, use Site Crawl (if you just need to update your data, use our “Recrawl” feature). If you’re looking for quick, one-time insights, check out On-Demand Crawl. Standard Pro users currently get 5 On-Demand Crawls per month (with limits increasing at higher tiers).

Your On-Demand Crawls are currently stored for 90 days. When you re-enter the feature, you’ll see a table of all of your recent crawls (the image below has been truncated):

Click on any row to go back to see the crawl data for that domain. If you get the sale and decide to move forward, congratulations! You can port that domain directly into a Moz campaign.

We hope you’ll try On-Demand Crawl out and let us know what you think. We’d love to hear your case studies, whether it’s sales, competitive analysis, or just trying to solve the mysteries of a Google update.

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!


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Tracking Your Link Prospecting Using Lists in Link Explorer

Posted by Dr-Pete

I’m a lazy marketer some days — I’ll admit it. I don’t do a lot of manual link prospecting, because it’s a ton of work, outreach, and follow-up. There are plenty of times, though, where I’ve got a good piece of content (well, at least I hope it’s good) and I want to know if it’s getting attention from specific sites, whether they’re in the search industry or the broader marketing or PR world. Luckily, we’ve made that question a lot easier to answer in Link Explorer, so today’s post is for all of you curious but occasionally lazy marketers. Hop into the tool if you want to follow along:

Open Link Explorer

(1) Track your content the lazy way

When you first visit Link Explorer, you’ll see that it defaults to “root domain”:

Some days, you don’t want to wade through your entire domain, but just want to target a single piece of content. Just enter or paste that URL, and select “exact page” (once you start typing a full path, we’ll even auto-select that option for you):

Now I can see just the link data for that page (note: screenshots have been edited for size):

Good news — my Whiteboard Friday already has a decent link profile. That’s already a fair amount to sort through, and as the link profile grows, it’s only going to get tougher. So, how can I pinpoint just the sites I’m interested in and track those sites over time?

(2) Make a list of link prospects

This is the one part we can’t automate for you. Make a list of prospects in whatever tool you please. Here’s an imaginary list I created in Excel:

Obviously, this list is on the short side, but let’s say I decide to pull a few of the usual suspects from the search marketing world, plus one from the broader marketing world, and a couple of aspirational sites (I’m probably not going to get that New York Times link, but let’s dream big).

(3) Create a tracking list in Link Explorer

Obviously, I could individually search for these domains in my full list of inbound links, but even with six prospects, that’s going to take some time. So, let’s do this the lazy way. Back in Link Explorer, look at the very bottom of the left-hand navigation and you’ll see “Link Targeting Lists”:

Keep scrolling — I promise it’s down there. Click on it, and you’ll see something like this:

On the far-right, under the main header, click on “[+] Create new list.” You’ll get an overlay with a three-step form like the one below. Just give your list a name, provide a target URL (the page you want to track links to), and copy-and-paste in your list of prospects. Here’s an example:

Click “Save,” and you should immediately get back some data.

Alas, no link from the New York Times. The blue icons show me that the prospects are currently linking to Moz.com, but not to my target page. The green icon shows me that I’ve already got a head-start — Search Engine Land is apparently linking to this post (thanks, Barry!).

Click on any arrow in the “Notes” column, and you can add a note to that entry, like so:

Don’t forget to hit “Save.” Congratulations, you’ve created your first list! Well, I’ve created your first list for you. Geez, you really are lazy.

(4) Check in to track your progress

Of course, the real magic is that the list just keeps working for you. At any time, you can return to “Link Tracking Lists” on the Link Explorer menu, and now you’ll see a master list of all your lists:

Just click on the list name you’re interested in, and you can see your latest-and-greatest data. We can’t build the links for you, but we can at least make keeping track of them a lot easier.

Bonus video: Now in electrifying Link-o-Vision!

Ok, it’s just a regular video, although it does require electricity. If you’re too lazy to read (in which case, let’s be honest, you probably didn’t get this far), I’ve put this whole workflow into an enchanting collection of words and sounds for you:

I hope you’ll put your newfound powers to good. Let us know how you’re using Tracking Lists (or how you plan to use them) in the comments, and where you’d like to see us take them next!

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!


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How to Supercharge Your Prospecting Emails

I ran across a YouTube video by sales guru Marc Wayshak offering key tips for writing effective prospecting emails that decision makers want to open, read and respond to. The problem is most prospecting emails fail to engage the recipient because they are never opened.

How to Get Your Recipient to Open Your Email

The first key to successful engagement is to get the target to open the email and this starts with the subject line. Wayshak suggest using non-promotional subject lines. “Most people are actually checking their emails using their phones, so think about what’s actually showing up on that phone,” he says. “Who’s it from, the subject line and then the first couple of words in the email body.”

He says to use non-salesy language, personalize the company name and to keep it short. In my experience, if a prospect feels it is simply a cut-n-paste, they will ignore, delete or click spam. Think of the subject line and first few words in an email as you knocking on their door. The recipient is looking through the email key hole and assessing whether you’re worth listening to.

Personalization is Key

When anyone receives an email the first thing they assess is whether the email is bulk or personal. This is a key theme of Wayshak’s in all of his tips for increasing email engagement.

“If a prospect thinks that what you have just sent out is a copy and pasted email that’s going to really everyone, it’s going to be deleted immediately,” says Wayshak. “It’s time to make those emails hyper specific to their exact world. We want to show that we’ve done our homework, that we know about the organization and that we know about them and maybe some of the challenges that they could be facing.”

Keep Prospecting Emails Short

The goal is to get the recipient to respond, not tell them every benefit or feature of your service or product. Wayshak believes that keeping it short is imperative to obtaining engagement. “We have at the most 20 seconds for the entire email before prospect is going to delete even the most engaging email,” he says. “So that means 3-5 sentences and then we’re done.”

Also keep in mind that keeping it too short can in itself seem promotional and not truly personal. It’s key to keep it personalized to the potential customers needs with the words in your prospecting emails similar to a short elevator pitch that feels real and solution focused for their specific business. With every prospect email, you should be trying to light a fire of interest that compels the reader to want more information.

Offer a Value Propositon

The only way to make a potential customer become a customer is to convince them that your product solves a problem. Knowing the company is key to correctly making this pitch. What are their problems and how does your product or service solve them? Wayshak suggests giving them specific feedback on their company.

“I have a client who helps companies improve their YouTube channel,” noted Wayshak. “What he did recently is he went through some of his top prospects YouTube page and gave them specific feedback on different areas that they could improve on their YouTube channel. Immediately, he got lots of responses from people saying I want to meet with you.”

He says that most salespeople are looking to take when they are writing emails, so instead give value. “That’s going to help you stand out from your competitors.”

Don’t Forget the Hook!

Your email is personalized, not too long and boring, is clearly written with an understanding of the prospects business and their problem and offers your product as the solution, but it’s still often not read. That’s because your forgot to add the hook!

“Conclude those emails with a question that’s going to engage them,” says Wayshak. “The problem is that most emails end with something that sounds like this. Let me know if I can ever be helpful. That is a total waste of time and you are not going to get responses.”

“Instead, engage like this. Do any of these challenges ring true to you? Or, where can I send that book to? Something that is specific and easy to answer that is likely to engage them in a very quick conversation.”

The post How to Supercharge Your Prospecting Emails appeared first on WebProNews.


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Introduction to Get Links! Week 2 – Link Prospecting

Author (displayed on the page): 

Master Profitable Link Building in 7 Weeks

Sign up for Wordtracker’s “Get Links!” video course (with a year’s subscription to the Link Builder tool thrown in) and in the second week you’ll learn:

1) How backlink analysis reveals the links you really must have
2) How to force Google to serve up the exact link prospects you’re after
3) How an army of ‘list creators’ can be your secret link building weapon
4) How broken links on external sites can win you a ton of links

For more details on how to sign up for this seven week course, go to Get Links!

Yes, Tell Me More

Watch:

Week 1

If you’ve questions about the course, please let us know at maria@wordtracker.com

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