Tag Archive | "Mind"

How Donald Trump, Heart Palpitations And A Trip To The Hospital Delivered An Important Reminder Of The Power Of Your Mind

Note From Yaro: This article is from my Change Manifesto series. Entrepreneurs-Journey.com and ChangeManifesto.com are being merged into my one main website, Yaro.blog, the umbrella brand for all my work going forward.  It was Tuesday night, election night in the USA. I was sitting on a couch in an AirBNB rental house in Venice Beach […]

The post How Donald Trump, Heart Palpitations And A Trip To The Hospital Delivered An Important Reminder Of The Power Of Your Mind appeared first on Yaro.Blog.

Entrepreneurs-Journey.com by Yaro Starak

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How To Relax A Sleep Deprived Mind And Get Back To Sleep

What Happens When Your Mind Turns Against You…   It’s 5am and I’m lying in bed.  I’ve been awake for an hour and I just can’t fall back to sleep.  Sometimes I wake up from a dream, sometimes a noise from the neighbourhood, or Ramses my cat decides he wants breakfast. …

The post How To Relax A Sleep Deprived Mind And Get Back To Sleep appeared first on Entrepreneurs-Journey.com.

Entrepreneurs-Journey.com by Yaro Starak

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How To Relax A Sleep Deprived Mind And Get Back To Sleep

What Happens When Your Mind Turns Against You…

 

It’s 5am and I’m lying in bed. 

I’ve been awake for an hour and I just can’t fall back to sleep. 

Sometimes I wake up from a dream, sometimes a noise from the neighbourhood, or Ramses my cat decides he wants breakfast. 

Whatever the trigger, once I am up, unless I

Read the rest of this entry »

The post How To Relax A Sleep Deprived Mind And Get Back To Sleep appeared first on Entrepreneurs-Journey.com.

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7 Ways to Manage Comments on Your Site (Without Losing Your Mind)

Image of Microphone in Front of Audience

Comments.

For some bloggers, they are the fuel that keeps their content creation engines running. For others, they are a nuisance and a hassle — something they try to deal with quickly in order to get to the “real” business of creating content.

As a content creator, dealing with comments is part of your job. And I believe that comments are an incredibly important part of creating (and growing) an engaged online community.

But how do you maintain healthy boundaries on your site while still encouraging lively and engaging discussion? What are the best ways to manage comments in the blogging world today, and what do you need to think about when creating your own comment policies?

1. Moderate your comments.

All of the big blogging platforms allow you to moderate your comments. Adjust your blog settings so your comments come straight to your email inbox, so you can approve them before they get published on the site. That’s the easiest way to keep strict control over the conversation, and make sure things stay civilized.

We’ve all seen sites where the comments are clearly not maintained or controlled in any way, and we’ve seen how quickly the conversation can go from civil to disrespectful, and unwelcoming to flat-out abusive.

Moderate your community conversation, so your blog is a safe and respectful place for people to give their opinions or ask questions.

2. Use a strong spam filter.

Make your job easier by using a strong spam filter. Spam filters keep the creepies and spammers out of your blog (and inbox) and sequestered in a spam folder. Filters don’t catch everything, but they’ll snag most obvious spam comments. Use one, and your comment moderation life will become infinitely easier.

Akismet is my favorite spam filter plugin for WordPress, and it’s built into every default installation.

3. Have a comment policy.

Decide what you will and won’t allow in the discussion on your site, and write it down. Even if the document is just for you, take the time to sit down and write out your thoughts before you open the floodgates.

Consider sharing your policy on your blog, if appropriate. Michael Hyatt and the Huffington Post both have clear comment policies published on their sites, and those policies are enforced.

We also have a published comment policy here at Copyblogger, and those rules are enforced by the editorial team monitoring the comments on each post.

You can also choose the short and concise route — as Tim Ferriss does — and add a short “be cool” section in the footer of each post. Of course, you need to add a line or two describing what “being cool” means to you and your community.

4. Do your best to respond to questions from your audience.

I’m still working on managing this, but Sonia Simone is an absolute pro at it.

She seems to manage to answer every question in a timely and interesting way, and I love reading her comment responses.

She even takes the time to pull out interesting and relevant comments and puts them in standalone Q&A posts — a fantastic way to serve your audience with even more content .

Do you need to respond to every single comment? There are different schools of thought on this question. Some say it’s important to acknowledge every single comment you receive, even if it’s just a quick “Thank you” as a response. Others say it’s okay NOT to respond to every comment, unless the comment includes a question or other remark that really begs a response.

You need to decide what your policy is on answering comments. Keep in mind that your thoughts on this subject may change as your blog audience grows — as you get more comments, you may find you don’t have enough time to respond to every single one.

5. Have limits on what advice you’re willing to give away for free.

If you’re a coach, consultant or other service provider, you need to be clear about how much advice you’re willing to give for free when someone asks a how-to question in the comments section of your site.

You may decide that you’re willing to address questions that dip into your service provider knowledge, as long as the question is relevant and useful for your entire audience. Or you might decide not to give away any advice that your clients would normally pay for.

But either way, you’ll need to figure out a diplomatic way to refer people to your “Contact” or “Services” page when it’s time to take the discussion offline (and possibly set up a consultation or coaching appointment with you).

As with everything in comment moderation (and in life) — decide what your boundaries are, and stick with them.

6. Don’t put up with trolls, bullies, abusive language or threats.

It’s your site, and you decide what you will and will not allow someone to publish on your posts. You are under NO obligation to publish every single comment that people submit, and you needn’t allow anyone to bully, harass, or push you around.

That said, a little healthy discussion is a good thing, so you shouldn’t arbitrarily delete any commenter who disagrees with you. If they make their point in a respectful way, it’s okay to have a little contention on your site. It might even be a good thing.

In other words, embrace thoughtful, respectful criticism.

Our post on grammar mistakes, 15 Grammar Goofs That Make You Look Silly, received a healthy amount of debate and discourse in the comments — and it’s also the all-time most popular post on our site. So don’t be afraid of a little heated discussion on your blog.

7. Take care of your guest authors.

Set each guest up as a user in WordPress, and have WordPress email that guest each time one of their posts receives a new comment. It’s an easy way to let your guest writers engage with their posts (and keep track of which comments they have replied to).

When you invite guest bloggers to publish posts on your site, it’s also your job to make sure no one abuses them. One of the things I love about Copyblogger (especially back in my guest posting days, when I was nervous about answering hyper-critical or trollish comments) is that Brian and Sonia would jump in on the rare occasion that a commenter was disrespectful or rude.

Your policy should always be to militantly protect your guest authors — they are your guests, after all.

Over to you …

Hopefully you’ve gotten some ideas for coming up with your own policies and rules about managing the discussion on your site (and I’ve made it a little easier for you to moderate your comments in a way that works for you AND your community.

Some popular bloggers have recently decided to drop public comments from their posts. Others keep them open, but employ a strict moderation policy that leaves no room for bullies or trolls.

What are your rules about comments on your site (and what stories do you have to share about commenting gone awry?)

See you in the comments?

About the Author: Beth Hayden is a Senior Staff Writer for Copyblogger Media. Get more from Beth on Twitter and Pinterest.

Related Stories

Copyblogger

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7 Ways to Manage Comments on Your Site (Without Losing Your Mind)

Image of Microphone in Front of Audience

Comments.

For some bloggers, they are the fuel that keeps their content creation engines running. For others, they are a nuisance and a hassle — something they try to deal with quickly in order to get to the “real” business of creating content.

As a content creator, dealing with comments is part of your job. And I believe that comments are an incredibly important part of creating (and growing) an engaged online community.

But how do you maintain healthy boundaries on your site while still encouraging lively and engaging discussion? What are the best ways to manage comments in the blogging world today, and what do you need to think about when creating your own comment policies?

1. Moderate your comments.

All of the big blogging platforms allow you to moderate your comments. Adjust your blog settings so your comments come straight to your email inbox, so you can approve them before they get published on the site. That’s the easiest way to keep strict control over the conversation, and make sure things stay civilized.

We’ve all seen sites where the comments are clearly not maintained or controlled in any way, and we’ve seen how quickly the conversation can go from civil to disrespectful, and unwelcoming to flat-out abusive.

Moderate your community conversation, so your blog is a safe and respectful place for people to give their opinions or ask questions.

2. Use a strong spam filter.

Make your job easier by using a strong spam filter. Spam filters keep the creepies and spammers out of your blog (and inbox) and sequestered in a spam folder. Filters don’t catch everything, but they’ll snag most obvious spam comments. Use one, and your comment moderation life will become infinitely easier.

Akismet is my favorite spam filter plugin for WordPress, and it’s built into every default installation.

3. Have a comment policy.

Decide what you will and won’t allow in the discussion on your site, and write it down. Even if the document is just for you, take the time to sit down and write out your thoughts before you open the floodgates.

Consider sharing your policy on your blog, if appropriate. Michael Hyatt and the Huffington Post both have clear comment policies published on their sites, and those policies are enforced.

We also have a published comment policy here at Copyblogger, and those rules are enforced by the editorial team monitoring the comments on each post.

You can also choose the short and concise route — as Tim Ferriss does — and add a short “be cool” section in the footer of each post. Of course, you need to add a line or two describing what “being cool” means to you and your community.

4. Do your best to respond to questions from your audience.

I’m still working on managing this, but Sonia Simone is an absolute pro at it.

She seems to manage to answer every question in a timely and interesting way, and I love reading her comment responses.

She even takes the time to pull out interesting and relevant comments and puts them in standalone Q&A posts — a fantastic way to serve your audience with even more content .

Do you need to respond to every single comment? There are different schools of thought on this question. Some say it’s important to acknowledge every single comment you receive, even if it’s just a quick “Thank you” as a response. Others say it’s okay NOT to respond to every comment, unless the comment includes a question or other remark that really begs a response.

You need to decide what your policy is on answering comments. Keep in mind that your thoughts on this subject may change as your blog audience grows — as you get more comments, you may find you don’t have enough time to respond to every single one.

5. Have limits on what advice you’re willing to give away for free.

If you’re a coach, consultant or other service provider, you need to be clear about how much advice you’re willing to give for free when someone asks a how-to question in the comments section of your site.

You may decide that you’re willing to address questions that dip into your service provider knowledge, as long as the question is relevant and useful for your entire audience. Or you might decide not to give away any advice that your clients would normally pay for.

But either way, you’ll need to figure out a diplomatic way to refer people to your “Contact” or “Services” page when it’s time to take the discussion offline (and possibly set up a consultation or coaching appointment with you).

As with everything in comment moderation (and in life) — decide what your boundaries are, and stick with them.

6. Don’t put up with trolls, bullies, abusive language or threats.

It’s your site, and you decide what you will and will not allow someone to publish on your posts. You are under NO obligation to publish every single comment that people submit, and you needn’t allow anyone to bully, harass, or push you around.

That said, a little healthy discussion is a good thing, so you shouldn’t arbitrarily delete any commenter who disagrees with you. If they make their point in a respectful way, it’s okay to have a little contention on your site. It might even be a good thing.

In other words, embrace thoughtful, respectful criticism.

Our post on grammar mistakes, 15 Grammar Goofs That Make You Look Silly, received a healthy amount of debate and discourse in the comments — and it’s also the all-time most popular post on our site. So don’t be afraid of a little heated discussion on your blog.

7. Take care of your guest authors.

Set each guest up as a user in WordPress, and have WordPress email that guest each time one of their posts receives a new comment. It’s an easy way to let your guest writers engage with their posts (and keep track of which comments they have replied to).

When you invite guest bloggers to publish posts on your site, it’s also your job to make sure no one abuses them. One of the things I love about Copyblogger (especially back in my guest posting days, when I was nervous about answering hyper-critical or trollish comments) is that Brian and Sonia would jump in on the rare occasion that a commenter was disrespectful or rude.

Your policy should always be to militantly protect your guest authors — they are your guests, after all.

Over to you …

Hopefully you’ve gotten some ideas for coming up with your own policies and rules about managing the discussion on your site (and I’ve made it a little easier for you to moderate your comments in a way that works for you AND your community.

Some popular bloggers have recently decided to drop public comments from their posts. Others keep them open, but employ a strict moderation policy that leaves no room for bullies or trolls.

What are your rules about comments on your site (and what stories do you have to share about commenting gone awry?)

See you in the comments?

About the Author: Beth Hayden is a Senior Staff Writer for Copyblogger Media. Get more from Beth on Twitter and Pinterest.

Related Stories

Copyblogger

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Keep Search In Mind While Being Social

As the good content theme continues unabated at BlogWorld, in one of today’s sessions, Duane Forrester, Senior Product Manager at Bing, urges the attendees to keep the search industry in mind when you’re out there promoting via Facebook and Twitter. …


WebProNews

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A 7-Step Guide to Mind Control: How to Quit Begging and Make People Want to Help You

image of black and white spiral

Well, why not?

They are the problem, right?

Here you are with a blog or a product or a charity you believe will change the world, and yet no matter how excited you are about the possibilities, no matter how much faith you have in yourself, you can’t help being worried:

  • If you ask a popular blogger for a link, will you get a reply?
  • If you ask a partner to email a product offer to their list, will they agree?
  • If you ask a friend for a donation, will they write you a check?

You don’t know. You can’t know. And it bothers you.

Wouldn’t it be easier if you could just close your eyes, pop over into their mind, and seize control?

Yeah. Too bad it’s not possible …

Or is it?

A Brief Introduction to Mind Control

As it happens, mind control is possible. Sort of.

No, you can’t turn your customers, partners, and in-laws into mindless zombies, but you can influence them.

In fact, there’s a science to it.

Back in the 1980s, a researcher by the name of Dr. Robert Cialdini wrote a book called Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion. He outlined different principles scientifically proven to influence people, as well as suggestions for how to do it.

Since then, it’s become maybe the most important book in the field of marketing. If you haven’t read it, you should, as well as the sequel.

Here’s the bad news:

Mind control isn’t about magic powers, arcane arts, or even shaving your head and gallivanting around in a wheelchair (although, I’ve been tempted). The truth is it’s about something that makes a lot of people squeamish: marketing.

The Truth about Marketing

The core of marketing isn’t customer profiling or market segmentation or any of the other complicated nonsense taught in most business schools.

It’s infinitely simpler than that, and it can be encapsulated in one word:

Yes.

You ask a blogger for a link, and they say, “Yes.” You ask a partner to promote your product, and they say, “Yes.” You ask a customer for a testimonial, and they say, “Yes.”

If you get enough yeses, your blog/business/charity succeeds. If you don’t, it fails. It’s so simple, and yet so few of us really understand how to do it.

The good news?

You can learn.

What follows is a marketer’s guide to mind control. Use these seven strategies wisely.

1. Do all the thinking for them

The worst mistake you can make when asking anyone for anything is telling them to “Think it over.”

Here’s why: people already have too much to think about.

Between their jobs, their family, and their own hobbies and friends, their mind is already stuffed, like a suitcase bulging at the sides. Add one more sock, and the whole thing will explode.

To avoid it, they “forget” about things that aren’t very important to them, or if they do think about you, they don’t think very hard. It’s not because they are lazy or stupid. They’re just busy, and you’re probably not very high up the priority list.

And so the best strategy is to not ask them to think.

Do it for them.

  • Instead of expecting them to see how your blog post will benefit their audience, explain it, and offer examples of similar posts that have done well in the past
  • Instead of asking them to host a webinar for you, setup the webinar, landing pages, and emails yourself, and send them as part of your pitch
  • Instead of begging a customer to write a testimonial from scratch, send them a dozen different examples to use as a guide

Be specific. Explain your reasoning. Offer proof. Tell them what to do next and why.

If you do it right, it won’t feel like asking at all. It’ll be more like advising.

And they’ll say yes. Not because of magical powers of persuasion, but because you’ve thought through everything, and it’s a no-brainer.

2. Start an avalanche

Creating a successful marketing campaign is a lot like starting an avalanche.

First, you climb up the mountain, and then you find the biggest boulder at the top, and then you sweat and grunt and strain to push the boulder over, and then you sit down and watch happily as the boulder goes crashing into other boulders, eventually bringing the whole side of the mountain down.

The lesson?

The first big yes is a pain in the butt to get, but if you get it from the right person, then getting all of the subsequent yeses is easy.

For example:

  • Getting a popular blogger to tweet your post is hard, but once they do, dozens or maybe even hundreds of people will retweet them
  • Convincing a leader in your niche to promote your product is tough, but once they do, everyone else will want to promote it too
  • Persuading a celebrity customer to give you a testimonial can be tough, but once you do, sales skyrocket, and getting further testimonials is easy

Of course, a lot of marketers recommend taking the opposite approach.

They tell you to start from the bottom and work your way up because it’s easier.

But really, it’s just an illusion. Yes, pushing over a small rock is easier than pushing over a boulder, but the boulder is a lot more likely to cause an avalanche. So while it’s more work in the beginning to get top people to help you, it’s actually less work in the long run, and the results are far, far greater.

3. Ask for an inch, take a mile

You’ve probably heard the expression, “Give them an inch, and they’ll take a mile,” right?

It’s supposed to be derogatory. It’s supposed to be a warning against appeasement. It’s supposed to protect you against getting taken advantage of.

But it’s also great marketing.

Whenever you’re asking for anything, never start by asking for everything upfront. Instead, start small. Make it easy to get started. Reduce the risk if it flops. Let them see the results for themselves.

And when it goes well, ask for more. And more. And more.

You might think that’s unethical, but if everything is going well, why not push for more? It’s not manipulation. It’s common sense.

For instance:

  • If you want to write a guest post for a popular blog, start by pitching the idea in one or two paragraphs, and then send them an outline, and then write the full draft of the post
  • If you want do a JV promotion with a leader in your field, start by asking them to email your launch content to only 10% of their list, and than 50% of their list, and then 100%, and then a direct mail campaign
  • If you want your customers to give you case studies, start by asking for a 1-3 sentence blurb, and then ask for a half-page testimonial, and then talk about doing a two-hour webinar going in depth about their success
  • It’s not psychological trickery or anything like that. It’s smart business. No one likes to risk everything upfront, and by offering progressive levels of commitment, your chances of getting them to say yes go through the roof.

    4. Always have a real deadline

    The keyword is “real.”

    All of us have had salesmen tell us, “Well, you’d better get back to me fast, because I have three more prospects coming this afternoon, and I don’t know how long it’ll last.” It’s BS, of course.

    There are no clients, and there is no urgency. The salesman is just so desperate he’s willing to lie, not only costing him your trust, but probably the sale too.

    And it’s not just salesmen.

    How many times have other people handed you completely artificial deadlines, thinking it will motivate you to act? Our teachers do it, our bosses do it, our family does it, and without thinking about it, you’ve probably done it too.

    Stop.

    Not only is it ineffective, but it’s totally unnecessary. Real urgency is easy to create. With a little thought, you can build it into your marketing. For example:

    • Instead of leaving a free report on your blog forever, tell everyone it will only be available for seven days, and then you’re going to start charging $ 7 for it. Not only will you get a lot more downloads, but other bloggers will be a lot more likely to promote it during the window
    • Instead of letting JV partners dictate when they will promote your product, schedule a launch, announce it to your list, and then forward partners the announcement, inviting them to participate
    • Instead of asking customers for testimonials whenever they get around to it, show them the timeline for an upcoming launch, including a specific date to send out testimonials. You need it by then, or you won’t be able to include it

    Will some of them bow out, saying they are too busy right now, and they’ll catch you next time?

    Sure, but it’s better than never getting started it all. And if you let other people dictate timelines, that’s exactly what will happen.

    5. Give ten times more than you take

    You know you’re supposed to give before you get, right? But what you might not know is how much to give.

    A lot of marketers mistakenly assume it’s a 1:1 ratio.

    Before you ask for a link, you should give a link. Before you ask for promotion, you should give a promotion. Before you ask for a testimonial, you should do one thing that deserves a testimonial.

    But that’s wrong. Smart marketers use a 10:1 ratio, and not just in action, but in value:

    • If you want 100 visitors, send them 1,000
    • If you want $ 1000 in product sales, sell $ 10,000 of their products first
    • If you want one testimonial, do ten different heroic acts of customer service worthy of a testimonial

    This isn’t about “You scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours.” It’s about generosity so overwhelming they can’t say no.

    Yes, it’s a lot of work, but that’s the price of influence.

    6. Stand for something greater than yourself

    Imagine there are two homeless guys standing on a street corner.

    The first guy has a normal, run-of-the-mill sign saying, “Spare a few dollars? God bless you.” The second guy, on the other hand, has a much more unusual sign: “Can’t afford to feed my family, and it’s tearing me apart. Please help, so I can stop feeling like such an awful Dad.”

    Which one would you be more likely to help? The second one, right?

    Forget giving him a few bucks. With a sign like that, you’d take him to the grocery store and buy him $ 200 worth of groceries. I know I would.

    That’s the power of standing for something bigger than yourself. It makes people care.

    And it applies to everything:

    • Instead of writing yet another how-to post, take a stand on an important issue, arguing with both passion and unassailable logic
    • Instead of starting yet another me-too consulting business, create a movement, working tirelessly to change the lives of your customers
    • Instead of selling yet another step-by-step manual, sell a philosophy, filled with heroic examples to inspire your customers

    Those are the types of things people want to talk about. They feel grateful just for having the chance to help you spread the word.

    7. Be completely and utterly shameless

    You want to know what separates a great marketer from a mediocre one?

    Shamelessness.

    I’m not referring to a lack of conscience, having a gregarious, extroverted personality, or any of the other ways we traditionally look at marketers. For the most part, those stereotypes are myths.

    No, by shamelessness, I mean this:

    An unshakable belief that what you are doing is good for the world and the willingness to do anything to bring it into being.

    When you believe in your content, you don’t publish it and forget it. You promote it day after day, week after week, month after month, year after year, working tirelessly to spread the message to everyone who needs to hear it, and refusing to rest until they do.

    When you believe in your product, you don’t balk at sales. You revel in it. Not because you’re greedy or desperate or egotistical, but because you know your product will help them, and so it’s your duty to get them to buy. Whatever it takes.

    When you believe in your charity, you don’t beg for donations. You demand them. You grab people by the shoulders and look them in the eyes and tell them what you’re doing is changing the world, and it’s time for them to step up and do their part.

    It’s not about money. It’s not about glory. It’s not even about legacy.

    It’s about falling in love. It’s about being enchanted. It’s about seeing a vision so beautiful you can’t help but fight to make it real.

    Do you have a vision like that? Something worth getting up every day and fighting for?

    If you do, you can accomplish damn near anything.

    And if you don’t, well …

    What’s the point?

    About the Author: Jon Morrow is Associate Editor of Copyblogger. If you’d like to learn what it really takes to become a popular blogger, check out his free videos on guest blogging.

    Copyblogger

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    Mind Control Marketing: How to Quit Begging and Make People Want to Help You

    image of black and white spiral

    Well, why not?

    They are the problem, right?

    Here you are with a blog or a product or a charity you believe will change the world, and yet no matter how excited you are about the possibilities, no matter how much faith you have in yourself, you can’t help being worried:

    • If you ask a popular blogger for a link, will you get a reply?
    • If you ask a partner to email a product offer to their list, will they agree?
    • If you ask a friend for a donation, will they write you a check?

    You don’t know. You can’t know. And it bothers you.

    Wouldn’t it be easier if you could just close your eyes, pop over into their mind, and seize control?

    Yeah. Too bad it’s not possible …

    Or is it?

    A Brief Introduction to Mind Control

    As it happens, mind control is possible. Sort of.

    No, you can’t turn your customers, partners, and in-laws into mindless zombies, but you can influence them.

    In fact, there’s a science to it.

    Back in the 1980s, a researcher by the name of Dr. Robert Cialdini wrote a book called Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion. He outlined different principles scientifically proven to influence people, as well as suggestions for how to do it.

    Since then, it’s become maybe the most important book in the field of marketing. If you haven’t read it, you should, as well as the sequel.

    Here’s the bad news:

    Mind control isn’t about magic powers, arcane arts, or even shaving your head and gallivanting around in a wheelchair (although, I’ve been tempted). The truth is it’s about something that makes a lot of people squeamish: marketing.

    The Truth about Marketing

    The core of marketing isn’t customer profiling or market segmentation or any of the other complicated nonsense taught in most business schools.

    It’s infinitely simpler than that, and it can be encapsulated in one word:

    Yes.

    You ask a blogger for a link, and they say, “Yes.” You ask a partner to promote your product, and they say, “Yes.” You ask a customer for a testimonial, and they say, “Yes.”

    If you get enough yeses, your blog/business/charity succeeds. If you don’t, it fails. It’s so simple, and yet so few of us really understand how to do it.

    The good news?

    You can learn.

    What follows is a marketer’s guide to mind control. Use these seven strategies wisely.

    1. Do all the thinking for them

    The worst mistake you can make when asking anyone for anything is telling them to “Think it over.”

    Here’s why: people already have too much to think about.

    Between their jobs, their family, and their own hobbies and friends, their mind is already stuffed, like a suitcase bulging at the sides. Add one more sock, and the whole thing will explode.

    To avoid it, they “forget” about things that aren’t very important to them, or if they do think about you, they don’t think very hard. It’s not because they are lazy or stupid. They’re just busy, and you’re probably not very high up the priority list.

    And so the best strategy is to not ask them to think.

    Do it for them.

    • Instead of expecting them to see how your blog post will benefit their audience, explain it, and offer examples of similar posts that have done well in the past
    • Instead of asking them to host a webinar for you, setup the webinar, landing pages, and emails yourself, and send them as part of your pitch
    • Instead of begging a customer to write a testimonial from scratch, send them a dozen different examples to use as a guide

    Be specific. Explain your reasoning. Offer proof. Tell them what to do next and why.

    If you do it right, it won’t feel like asking at all. It’ll be more like advising.

    And they’ll say yes. Not because of magical powers of persuasion, but because you’ve thought through everything, and it’s a no-brainer.

    2. Start an avalanche

    Creating a successful marketing campaign is a lot like starting an avalanche.

    First, you climb up the mountain, and then you find the biggest boulder at the top, and then you sweat and grunt and strain to push the boulder over, and then you sit down and watch happily as the boulder goes crashing into other boulders, eventually bringing the whole side of the mountain down.

    The lesson?

    The first big yes is a pain in the butt to get, but if you get it from the right person, then getting all of the subsequent yeses is easy.

    For example:

    • Getting a popular blogger to tweet your post is hard, but once they do, dozens or maybe even hundreds of people will retweet them
    • Convincing a leader in your niche to promote your product is tough, but once they do, everyone else will want to promote it too
    • Persuading a celebrity customer to give you a testimonial can be tough, but once you do, sales skyrocket, and getting further testimonials is easy

    Of course, a lot of marketers recommend taking the opposite approach.

    They tell you to start from the bottom and work your way up because it’s easier.

    But really, it’s just an illusion. Yes, pushing over a small rock is easier than pushing over a boulder, but the boulder is a lot more likely to cause an avalanche. So while it’s more work in the beginning to get top people to help you, it’s actually less work in the long run, and the results are far, far greater.

    3. Ask for an inch, take a mile

    You’ve probably heard the expression, “Give them an inch, and they’ll take a mile,” right?

    It’s supposed to be derogatory. It’s supposed to be a warning against appeasement. It’s supposed to protect you against getting taken advantage of.

    But it’s also great marketing.

    Whenever you’re asking for anything, never start by asking for everything upfront. Instead, start small. Make it easy to get started. Reduce the risk if it flops. Let them see the results for themselves.

    And when it goes well, ask for more. And more. And more.

    You might think that’s unethical, but if everything is going well, why not push for more? It’s not manipulation. It’s common sense.

    For instance:

  • If you want to write a guest post for a popular blog, start by pitching the idea in one or two paragraphs, and then send them an outline, and then write the full draft of the post
  • If you want do a JV promotion with a leader in your field, start by asking them to email your launch content to only 10% of their list, and than 50% of their list, and then 100%, and then a direct mail campaign
  • If you want your customers to give you case studies, start by asking for a 1-3 sentence blurb, and then ask for a half-page testimonial, and then talk about doing a two-hour webinar going in depth about their success
  • It’s not psychological trickery or anything like that. It’s smart business. No one likes to risk everything upfront, and by offering progressive levels of commitment, your chances of getting them to say yes go through the roof.

    4. Always have a real deadline

    The keyword is “real.”

    All of us have had salesmen tell us, “Well, you’d better get back to me fast, because I have three more prospects coming this afternoon, and I don’t know how long it’ll last.” It’s BS, of course.

    There are no clients, and there is no urgency. The salesman is just so desperate he’s willing to lie, not only costing him your trust, but probably the sale too.

    And it’s not just salesmen.

    How many times have other people handed you completely artificial deadlines, thinking it will motivate you to act? Our teachers do it, our bosses do it, our family does it, and without thinking about it, you’ve probably done it too.

    Stop.

    Not only is it ineffective, but it’s totally unnecessary. Real urgency is easy to create. With a little thought, you can build it into your marketing. For example:

    • Instead of leaving a free report on your blog forever, tell everyone it will only be available for seven days, and then you’re going to start charging $ 7 for it. Not only will you get a lot more downloads, but other bloggers will be a lot more likely to promote it during the window
    • Instead of letting JV partners dictate when they will promote your product, schedule a launch, announce it to your list, and then forward partners the announcement, inviting them to participate
    • Instead of asking customers for testimonials whenever they get around to it, show them the timeline for an upcoming launch, including a specific date to send out testimonials. You need it by then, or you won’t be able to include it

    Will some of them bow out, saying they are too busy right now, and they’ll catch you next time?

    Sure, but it’s better than never getting started it all. And if you let other people dictate timelines, that’s exactly what will happen.

    5. Give ten times more than you take

    You know you’re supposed to give before you get, right? But what you might not know is how much to give.

    A lot of marketers mistakenly assume it’s a 1:1 ratio.

    Before you ask for a link, you should give a link. Before you ask for promotion, you should give a promotion. Before you ask for a testimonial, you should do one thing that deserves a testimonial.

    But that’s wrong. Smart marketers use a 10:1 ratio, and not just in action, but in value:

    • If you want 100 visitors, send them 1,000
    • If you want $ 1000 in product sales, sell $ 10,000 of their products first
    • If you want one testimonial, do ten different heroic acts of customer service worthy of a testimonial

    This isn’t about “You scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours.” It’s about generosity so overwhelming they can’t say no.

    Yes, it’s a lot of work, but that’s the price of influence.

    6. Stand for something greater than yourself

    Imagine there are two homeless guys standing on a street corner.

    The first guy has a normal, run-of-the-mill sign saying, “Spare a few dollars? God bless you.” The second guy, on the other hand, has a much more unusual sign: “Can’t afford to feed my family, and it’s tearing me apart. Please help, so I can stop feeling like such an awful Dad.”

    Which one would you be more likely to help? The second one, right?

    Forget giving him a few bucks. With a sign like that, you’d take him to the grocery store and buy him $ 200 worth of groceries. I know I would.

    That’s the power of standing for something bigger than yourself. It makes people care.

    And it applies to everything:

    • Instead of writing yet another how-to post, take a stand on an important issue, arguing with both passion and unassailable logic
    • Instead of starting yet another me-too consulting business, create a movement, working tirelessly to change the lives of your customers
    • Instead of selling yet another step-by-step manual, sell a philosophy, filled with heroic examples to inspire your customers

    Those are the types of things people want to talk about. They feel grateful just for having the chance to help you spread the word.

    7. Be completely and utterly shameless

    You want to know what separates a great marketer from a mediocre one?

    Shamelessness.

    I’m not referring to a lack of conscience, having a gregarious, extroverted personality, or any of the other ways we traditionally look at marketers. For the most part, those stereotypes are myths.

    No, by shamelessness, I mean this:

    An unshakable belief that what you are doing is good for the world and the willingness to do anything to bring it into being.

    When you believe in your content, you don’t publish it and forget it. You promote it day after day, week after week, month after month, year after year, working tirelessly to spread the message to everyone who needs to hear it, and refusing to rest until they do.

    When you believe in your product, you don’t balk at sales. You revel in it. Not because you’re greedy or desperate or egotistical, but because you know your product will help them, and so it’s your duty to get them to buy. Whatever it takes.

    When you believe in your charity, you don’t beg for donations. You demand them. You grab people by the shoulders and look them in the eyes and tell them what you’re doing is changing the world, and it’s time for them to step up and do their part.

    It’s not about money. It’s not about glory. It’s not even about legacy.

    It’s about falling in love. It’s about being enchanted. It’s about seeing a vision so beautiful you can’t help but fight to make it real.

    Do you have a vision like that? Something worth getting up every day and fighting for?

    If you do, you can accomplish damn near anything.

    And if you don’t, well …

    What’s the point?

    About the Author: Jon Morrow is Associate Editor of Copyblogger. If you’d like to learn what it really takes to become a popular blogger, check out his free videos on guest blogging.


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