Tag Archive | "Million"

Workona Launches Desktop For The Cloud; Raises $6 Million in Seed Funding

Workona has announced “the launch of their cloud desktop, a work management platform that allows users to access and manage resources across more than 75 popular cloud apps from a single unified system.”

The company recently completed “a $ 6 million seed funding round, led by K9 Ventures and August Capital, to accelerate its product development and user acquisition.”

Recognizing that “modern teams run on cloud software,” Workona is trying to bring the disparate pieces of a cloud-based workflow together in a productive, intuitive manner. Workona’s cloud-based desktop connects to the most popular cloud apps in use today, such as Amazon, Asana, Basecamp, Box, Dropbox, Evernote, Google Docs, Outlook, Zoom and more. Each app can be accessed and worked with inside Workona. Shared workspaces take collaboration up a notch, increasing productivity even more.

“So many people spend their days working in the cloud, but there was no platform to manage that work. That’s what Workona does,” said Quinn Morgan, Workona co-founder and CEO. “Previously, all of your cloud apps, projects, and documents were scattered across the web. Workona’s cloud desktop pulls them together into one powerful system.”

Having a central location to access different tools and platforms significantly increases a user’s efficiency.

“Workona is a force multiplier because it impacts every level of your work,” Morgan said. “Your apps and projects are at your fingertips, so every action you take is significantly faster.”

“Workona solves a problem that is staring us in the face, but we haven’t noticed it yet,” said Manu Kumar, Workona board member and K9 Ventures investor. “Microsoft and Apple used to put an enormous amount of engineering power into optimizing the desktop, but all that was forgotten when we transitioned to working in the browser. Workona has picked up where they left off by bringing the best features of a desktop to the cloud.”

The company says that early users come “from both startups and Fortune 500 companies, and include industry leaders like Twitter, Salesforce, Amazon, and NASA.” It’s a safe bet that list will continue to grow.

The post Workona Launches Desktop For The Cloud; Raises $ 6 Million in Seed Funding appeared first on WebProNews.


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Genius sues Google and LyricFind for more than $50 million in damages

The company alleges breach of contract, unfair competition and lost ad revenue.



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.


Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

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Nines Radiology Aims to Upend Radiology Using AI, Scores $16.5 Million In Funding

Nines Radiology has raised $ 16.5 million in Series A funding, according to a company press release.

Nines Radiology was founded in 2017 by self-driving-car pioneer David Stavens and NYC radiologist Dr. Alexander Kagen. The unlikely partnership aims to use technology, specifically artificial intelligence (AI), to revolutionize how radiologists interact with patients. In the company’s press release detailing a successful round of funding, the company also unveiled their mission.

“We have a fundamental belief that radiology reimagined with modern data science can significantly improve the lives of patients and clinicians alike,” said co-founder and CEO David Stavens. “We’re working to pioneer new approaches and innovations from clinical care, engineering and data science. Radiologists at Nines are care providers, innovators, builders, and thought leaders. Our radiologists provide the best patient care, while also working with our engineers to build the future.”

The company is betting on the ability of technology and AI to help cut through the complexity modern radiologists face on a day-to-day basis.

“Radiology exams are becoming ever more detailed and complex with advancements in imaging technology, which in turn increases the workload on radiologists,” said Dr. Kagen, who will serve as Chief Medical Officer for Nines in addition to his role at Mount Sinai. “Radiologists need to be at the forefront of reimagining the future of medicine. Nines is a place where radiologists are empowered to build technology that unlocks the next level of patient care.

“The right solution for radiologists is the one that results in the right interpretation. We are combining technology and clinical expertise to help radiologists intelligently prioritize their ever-growing imaging worklists. Nines is designed to help radiologists adapt and build toward a near-term future where technology plays an increasingly larger role in improving patient outcomes.”

Nines Radiology is yet another example of AI and machine learning being used to improve and revolutionize industries.

The post Nines Radiology Aims to Upend Radiology Using AI, Scores $ 16.5 Million In Funding appeared first on WebProNews.


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Clumio Raises $135 Million Series C Funding For Cloud Backup Solutions

Cloud backup provider Clumio has announced that it has secured $ 135 million in Series C funding.

Clumio was founded by serial entrepreneur Poojan Kumar to provide cloud companies with a suite of cloud-based backup tools. The company’s approach is someone unique in that, “unlike legacy backup vendors, Clumio SaaS is born in the cloud,” says Kumar. “This round of investment allows us to push that advantage as we accelerate our development and go to market strategy while continuing to meet customer requirements for backup, regardless of where the data is.”

As an added benefit of the service, customers do not need to install—or even purchase—any specialized hardware or software to take advantage of Clumio SaaS. The service allows a company the ability to rewind and go back to a point before something went wrong, such as a cyberattack or data loss event.

“Similar to Snowflake disrupting the data warehousing market by leveraging the scale, elasticity and economics of the public cloud, Clumio is building a globally consolidated data protection service the right way,” said Mike Speiser, Managing Director, Sutter Hill Ventures. “Harnessing the full power of the public cloud, they are reimagining the backup experience for the enterprise paying particular attention to security, predictable costs and simplicity for their customers.”

The company plans to put the funding to good use, growing its engineering team and expanding its U.S. operations.

“This new funding will help Clumio execute in the following areas:

  • Accelerate the growth of its engineering team, both at the company’s headquarters in Santa Clara, CA and in its new development center in Bangalore, India
  • Expand go to market and service operations in the U.S.
  • Add more support for its 100% channel strategy with additional partner resources and programs and build upon momentum in technology partner programs with AWS, VMware and others
  • Introduce support for new workloads as Clumio continues to execute against its vision for a globally consolidated data protection service

“Clumio is a secure, backup as a service that consolidates the protection of an enterprise data center and any remote sites with no hardware or software to size, configure, manage – or even buy at all. As enterprises move aggressively to cloud, they can use Clumio to protect workloads like VMware Cloud on AWS and native AWS services. Authentic SaaS protects data regardless of where it resides and delivers critical benefits to the enterprise.”

The post Clumio Raises $ 135 Million Series C Funding For Cloud Backup Solutions appeared first on WebProNews.


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Alborz Fallah: The Complete Story Behind The $62 Million Dollar Sale Of CarAdvice.com.au

What does it take to go from a car blog started in your parent’s bedroom, to a $ 62 Million sale to the largest media company in Australia? — The Alborz Fallah story.

The post Alborz Fallah: The Complete Story Behind The $ 62 Million Dollar Sale Of CarAdvice.com.au appeared first on Yaro.Blog.

Entrepreneurs-Journey.com by Yaro Starak

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A Breakdown of HTML Usage Across ~8 Million Pages (& What It Means for Modern SEO)

Posted by Catalin.Rosu

Not long ago, my colleagues and I at Advanced Web Ranking came up with an HTML study based on about 8 million index pages gathered from the top twenty Google results for more than 30 million keywords.

We wrote about the markup results and how the top twenty Google results pages implement them, then went even further and obtained HTML usage insights on them.

What does this have to do with SEO?

The way HTML is written dictates what users see and how search engines interpret web pages. A valid, well-formatted HTML page also reduces possible misinterpretation — of structured data, metadata, language, or encoding — by search engines.

This is intended to be a technical SEO audit, something we wanted to do from the beginning: a breakdown of HTML usage and how the results relate to modern SEO techniques and best practices.

In this article, we’re going to address things like meta tags that Google understands, JSON-LD structured data, language detection, headings usage, social links & meta distribution, AMP, and more.

Meta tags that Google understands

When talking about the main search engines as traffic sources, sadly it’s just Google and the rest, with Duckduckgo gaining traction lately and Bing almost nonexistent.

Thus, in this section we’ll be focusing solely on the meta tags that Google listed in the Search Console Help Center.

chart (3).png
Pie chart showing the total numbers for the meta tags that Google understands, described in detail in the sections below.

<meta name=”description” content=”…”>

The meta description is a ~150 character snippet that summarizes a page’s content. Search engines show the meta description in the search results when the searched phrase is contained in the description.

SELECTOR

COUNT

<meta name="description" content="*">

4,391,448

<meta name="description" content="">

374,649

<meta name="description">

13,831

On the extremes, we found 685,341 meta elements with content shorter than 30 characters and 1,293,842 elements with the content text longer than 160 characters.

<title>

The title is technically not a meta tag, but it’s used in conjunction with meta name=”description”.

This is one of the two most important HTML tags when it comes to SEO. It’s also a must according to W3C, meaning no page is valid with a missing title tag.

Research suggests that if you keep your titles under a reasonable 60 characters then you can expect your titles to be rendered properly in the SERPs. In the past, there were signs that Google’s search results title length was extended, but it wasn’t a permanent change.

Considering all the above, from the full 6,263,396 titles we found, 1,846,642 title tags appear to be too long (more than 60 characters) and 1,985,020 titles had lengths considered too short (under 30 characters).

titles.png
Pie chart showing the title tag length distribution, with a length less than 30 chars being 31.7% and a length greater than 60 chars being about 29.5%.

A title being too short shouldn’t be a problem —after all, it’s a subjective thing depending on the website business. Meaning can be expressed with fewer words, but it’s definitely a sign of wasted optimization opportunity.

SELECTOR

COUNT

<title>*</title>

6,263,396

missing <title> tag

1,285,738

Another interesting thing is that, among the sites ranking on page 1–2 of Google, 351,516 (~5% of the total 7.5M) are using the same text for the title and h1 on their index pages.

Also, did you know that with HTML5 you only need to specify the HTML5 doctype and a title in order to have a perfectly valid page?

<!DOCTYPE html>
<title>red</title>

<meta name=”robots|googlebot”>

“These meta tags can control the behavior of search engine crawling and indexing. The robots meta tag applies to all search engines, while the “googlebot” meta tag is specific to Google.”
Meta tags that Google understands

SELECTOR

COUNT

<meta name="robots" content="..., ...">

1,577,202

<meta name="googlebot" content="..., ...">

139,458


HTML snippet with a meta robots and its content parameters.

So the robots meta directives provide instructions to search engines on how to crawl and index a page’s content. Leaving aside the googlebot meta count which is kind of low, we were curious to see the most frequent robots parameters, considering that a huge misconception is that you have to add a robots meta tag in your HTML’s head. Here’s the top 5:

SELECTOR

COUNT

<meta name="robots" content="index,follow">

632,822

<meta name="robots" content="index">

180,226

<meta name="robots" content="noodp">

115,128

<meta name="robots" content="all">

111,777

<meta name="robots" content="nofollow">

83,639

<meta name=”google” content=”nositelinkssearchbox”>

“When users search for your site, Google Search results sometimes display a search box specific to your site, along with other direct links to your site. This meta tag tells Google not to show the sitelinks search box.”
Meta tags that Google understands

SELECTOR

COUNT

<meta name="google" content="nositelinkssearchbox">

1,263

Unsurprisingly, not many websites choose to explicitly tell Google not to show a sitelinks search box when their site appears in the search results.

<meta name=”google” content=”notranslate”>

“This meta tag tells Google that you don’t want us to provide a translation for this page.” - Meta tags that Google understands

There may be situations where providing your content to a much larger group of users is not desired. Just as it says in the Google support answer above, this meta tag tells Google that you don’t want them to provide a translation for this page.

SELECTOR

COUNT

<meta name="google" content="notranslate">

7,569

<meta name=”google-site-verification” content=”…”>

“You can use this tag on the top-level page of your site to verify ownership for Search Console.”
Meta tags that Google understands

SELECTOR

COUNT

<meta name="google-site-verification" content="...">

1,327,616

While we’re on the subject, did you know that if you’re a verified owner of a Google Analytics property, Google will now automatically verify that same website in Search Console?

<meta charset=”…” >

“This defines the page’s content type and character set.”
Meta tags that Google understands

This is basically one of the good meta tags. It defines the page’s content type and character set. Considering the table below, we noticed that just about half of the index pages we analyzed define a meta charset.

SELECTOR

COUNT

<meta charset="..." >

3,909,788

<meta http-equiv=”refresh” content=”…;url=…”>

“This meta tag sends the user to a new URL after a certain amount of time and is sometimes used as a simple form of redirection.”
Meta tags that Google understands

It’s preferable to redirect your site using a 301 redirect rather than a meta refresh, especially when we assume that 30x redirects don’t lose PageRank and the W3C recommends that this tag not be used. Google is not a fan either, recommending you use a server-side 301 redirect instead.

SELECTOR

COUNT

<meta http-equiv="refresh" content="...;url=...">

7,167

From the total 7.5M index pages we parsed, we found 7,167 pages that are using the above redirect method. Authors do not always have control over server-side technologies and apparently they use this technique in order to enable redirects on the client side.

Also, using Workers is a cutting-edge alternative n order to overcome issues when working with legacy tech stacks and platform limitations.

<meta name=”viewport” content=”…”>

“This tag tells the browser how to render a page on a mobile device. Presence of this tag indicates to Google that the page is mobile-friendly.”
Meta tags that Google understands

SELECTOR

COUNT

<meta name="viewport" content="...">

4,992,791

Starting July 1, 2019, all sites started to be indexed using Google’s mobile-first indexing. Lighthouse checks whether there’s a meta name=”viewport” tag in the head of the document, so this meta should be on every webpage, no matter what framework or CMS you’re using.

Considering the above, we would have expected more websites than the 4,992,791 out of 7.5 million index pages analyzed to use a valid meta name=”viewport” in their head sections.

Designing mobile-friendly sites ensures that your pages perform well on all devices, so make sure your web page is mobile-friendly here.

<meta name=”rating” content=”…” />

“Labels a page as containing adult content, to signal that it be filtered by SafeSearch results.”
Meta tags that Google understands

SELECTOR

COUNT

<meta name="rating" content="..." />

133,387

This tag is used to denote the maturity rating of content. It was not added to the meta tags that Google understands list until recently. Check out this article by Kate Morris on how to tag adult content.

JSON-LD structured data

Structured data is a standardized format for providing information about a page and classifying the page content. The format of structured data can be Microdata, RDFa, and JSON-LD — all of these help Google understand the content of your site and trigger special search result features for your pages.

While having a conversation with the awesome Dan Shure, he came up with a good idea to look for structured data, such as the organization’s logo, in search results and in the Knowledge Graph.

In this section, we’ll be using JSON-LD (JavaScript Object Notation for Linked Data) only in order to gather structured data info.This is what Google recommends anyway for providing clues about the meaning of a web page.

Some useful bits on this:

  • At Google I/O 2019, it was announced that the structured data testing tool will be superseded by the rich results testing tool.
  • Now Googlebot indexes web pages using the latest Chromium rather than the old Chrome 42, meaning you can mitigate the SEO issues you may have had in the past, with structured data support as well.
  • Jason Barnard had an interesting talk at SMX London 2019 on how Google Search ranking works and according to his theory, there are seven ranking factors we can count on; structured data is definitely one of them.
  • Builtvisible‘s guide on Microdata, JSON-LD, & Schema.org contains everything you need to know about using structured data on your website.
  • Here’s an awesome guide to JSON-LD for beginners by Alexis Sanders.
  • Last but not least, there are lots of articles, presentations, and posts to dive in on the official JSON for Linking Data website.

Advanced Web Ranking’s HTML study relies on analyzing index pages only. What’s interesting is that even though it’s not stated in the guidelines, Google doesn’t seem to care about structured data on index pages, as stated in a Stack Overflow answer by Gary Illyes several years ago. Yet, on JSON-LD structured data types that Google understands, we found a total of 2,727,045 features:

json-ld-chart.png
Pie chart showing the structured data types that Google understands, with Sitelinks searchbox being 49.7% — the highest value.

STRUCTURED DATA FEATURES

COUNT

Article

35,961

Breadcrumb

30,306

Book

143

Carousel

13,884

Corporate contact

41,588

Course

676

Critic review

2,740

Dataset

28

Employer aggregate rating

7

Event

18,385

Fact check

7

FAQ page

16

How-to

8

Job posting

355

Livestream

232

Local business

200,974

Logo

442,324

Media

1,274

Occupation

0

Product

16,090

Q&A page

20

Recipe

434

Review snippet

72,732

Sitelinks searchbox

1,354,754

Social profile

478,099

Software app

780

Speakable

516

Subscription and paywalled content

363

Video

14,349

rel=canonical

The rel=canonical element, often called the “canonical link,” is an HTML element that helps webmasters prevent duplicate content issues. It does this by specifying the “canonical URL,” the “preferred” version of a web page.

SELECTOR

COUNT

<link rel=canonical href="*">

3,183,575

meta name=”keywords”

It’s not new that <meta name=”keywords”> is obsolete and Google doesn’t use it anymore. It also appears as though <meta name=”keywords”> is a spam signal for most of the search engines.

“While the main search engines don’t use meta keywords for ranking, they’re very useful for onsite search engines like Solr.”
JP Sherman on why this obsolete meta might still be useful nowadays.

SELECTOR

COUNT

<meta name="keywords" content="*">

2,577,850

<meta name="keywords" content="">

256,220

<meta name="keywords">

14,127

Headings

Within 7.5 million pages, h1 (59.6%) and h2 (58.9%) are among the twenty-eight elements used on the most pages. Still, after gathering all the headings, we found that h3 is the heading with the largest number of appearances — 29,565,562 h3s out of 70,428,376  total headings found.

Random facts:

  • The h1–h6 elements represent the six levels of section headings. Here are the full stats on headings usage, but we found 23,116 of h7s and 7,276 of h8s too. That’s a funny thing because plenty of people don’t even use h6s very often.
  • There are 3,046,879 pages with missing h1 tags and within the rest of the 4,502,255 pages, the h1 usage frequency is 2.6, with a total of 11,675,565 h1 elements.
  • While there are 6,263,396 pages with a valid title, as seen above, only 4,502,255 of them are using a h1 within the body of their content.

Missing alt tags

This eternal SEO and accessibility issue still seems to be common after analyzing this set of data. From the total of 669,591,743 images, almost 90% are missing the alt attribute or use it with a blank value.

chart (4).png
Pie chart showing the img tag alt attribute distribution, with missing alt being predominant — 81.7% from a total of about 670 million images we found.

SELECTOR

COUNT

img

669,591,743

img alt=”*”

79,953,034

img alt=”"

42,815,769

img w/ missing alt

546,822,940

Language detection

According to the specs, the language information specified via the lang attribute may be used by a user agent to control rendering in a variety of ways.

The part we’re interested in here is about “assisting search engines.”

“The HTML lang attribute is used to identify the language of text content on the web. This information helps search engines return language specific results, and it is also used by screen readers that switch language profiles to provide the correct accent and pronunciation.”
Léonie Watson

A while ago, John Mueller said Google ignores the HTML lang attribute and recommended the use of link hreflang instead. The Google Search Console documentation states that Google uses hreflang tags to match the user’s language preference to the right variation of your pages.

lang-vs-hreflang.png
Bar chart showing that 65% of the 7.5 million index pages use the lang attribute on the html element, at the same time 21.6% use at least a link hreflang.

Of the 7.5 million index pages that we were able to look into, 4,903,665 use the lang attribute on the html element. That’s about 65%!

When it comes to the hreflang attribute, suggesting the existence of a multilingual website, we found about 1,631,602 pages — that means around 21.6% index pages use at least a link rel=”alternate” href=”*” hreflang=”*” element.

Google Tag Manager

From the beginning, Google Analytics’ main task was to generate reports and statistics about your website. But if you want to group certain pages together to see how people are navigating through that funnel, you need a unique Google Analytics tag. This is where things get complicated.

Google Tag Manager makes it easier to:

  • Manage this mess of tags by letting you define custom rules for when and what user actions your tags should fire
  • Change your tags whenever you want without actually changing the source code of your website, which sometimes can be a headache due to slow release cycles
  • Use other analytics/marketing tools with GTM, again without touching the website’s source code

We searched for *googletagmanager.com/gtm.js references and saw that about 345,979 pages are using the Google Tag Manager.

rel=”nofollow”

“Nofollow” provides a way for webmasters to tell search engines “don’t follow links on this page” or “don’t follow this specific link.”

Google does not follow these links and likewise does not transfer equity. Considering this, we were curious about rel=”nofollow” numbers. We found a total of 12,828,286 rel=”nofollow” links within 7.5 million index pages, with a computed average of 1.69 rel=”nofollow” per page.

Last month, Google announced two new link attributes values that should be used in order to mark the nofollow property of a link: rel=”sponsored” and rel=”ugc”. I’d recommend you go read Cyrus Shepard’s article on how Google’s nofollow, sponsored, & ugc links impact SEO, learn why Google changed nofollow,  the ranking impact of nofollow links, and more.


A table showing how Google’s nofollow, sponsored, and UGC link attributes impact SEO, from Cyrus Shepard’s article.

We went a bit further and looked up these new link attributes values, finding 278 rel=”sponsored” and 123 rel=”ugc”. To make sure we had the relevant data for these queries, we updated the index pages data set specifically two weeks after the Google announcement on this matter. Then, using Moz authority metrics, we sorted out the top URLs we found that use at least one of the rel=”sponsored” or rel=”ugc” pair:

  • https://www.seroundtable.com/
  • https://letsencrypt.org/
  • https://www.newsbomb.gr/
  • https://thehackernews.com/
  • https://www.ccn.com/
  • https://www.chip.pl/
  • https://www.gamereactor.se/
  • https://www.tribes.co.uk/

AMP

Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP) are a Google initiative which aims to speed up the mobile web. Many publishers are making their content available parallel to the AMP format.

To let Google and other platforms know about it, you need to link AMP and non-AMP pages together.

Within the millions of pages we looked at, we found only 24,807 non-AMP pages referencing their AMP version using rel=amphtml.

Social

We wanted to know how shareable or social a website is nowadays, so knowing that Josh Buchea made an awesome list with everything that could go in the head of your webpage, we extracted the social sections from there and got the following numbers:

Facebook Open Graph

chart.png
Bar chart showing the Facebook Open Graph meta tags distribution, described in detail in the table below.

SELECTOR

COUNT

meta property="fb:app_id" content="*"

277,406

meta property="og:url" content="*"

2,909,878

meta property="og:type" content="*"

2,660,215

meta property="og:title" content="*"

3,050,462

meta property="og:image" content="*"

2,603,057

meta property="og:image:alt" content="*"

54,513

meta property="og:description" content="*"

1,384,658

meta property="og:site_name" content="*"

2,618,713

meta property="og:locale" content="*"

1,384,658

meta property="article:author" content="*"

14,289

Twitter card

chart (1).png
Bar chart showing the Twitter Card meta tags distribution, described in detail in the table below.

SELECTOR

COUNT

meta name="twitter:card" content="*"

1,535,733

meta name="twitter:site" content="*"

512,907

meta name="twitter:creator" content="*"

283,533

meta name="twitter:url" content="*"

265,478

meta name="twitter:title" content="*"

716,577

meta name="twitter:description" content="*"

1,145,413

meta name="twitter:image" content="*"

716,577

meta name="twitter:image:alt" content="*"

30,339

And speaking of links, we grabbed all of them that were pointing to the most popular social networks.

chart (2).png
Pie chart showing the external social links distribution, described in detail in the table below.

SELECTOR

COUNT

<a href*="facebook.com">

6,180,313

<a href*="twitter.com">

5,214,768

<a href*="linkedin.com">

1,148,828

<a href*="plus.google.com">

1,019,970

Apparently there are lots of websites that still link to their Google+ profiles, which is probably an oversight considering the not-so-recent Google+ shutdown.

rel=prev/next

According to Google, using rel=prev/next is not an indexing signal anymore, as announced earlier this year:

“As we evaluated our indexing signals, we decided to retire rel=prev/next. Studies show that users love single-page content, aim for that when possible, but multi-part is also fine for Google Search.”
Tweeted by Google Webmasters

However, in case it matters for you, Bing says it uses them as hints for page discovery and site structure understanding.

“We’re using these (like most markup) as hints for page discovery and site structure understanding. At this point, we’re not merging pages together in the index based on these and we’re not using prev/next in the ranking model.”
Frédéric Dubut from Bing

Nevertheless, here are the usage stats we found while looking at millions of index pages:

SELECTOR

COUNT

<link rel="prev" href="*"

20,160

<link rel="next" href="*"

242,387

That’s pretty much it!

Knowing how the average web page looks using data from about 8 million index pages can give us a clearer idea of trends and help us visualize common usage of HTML when it comes to SEO modern and emerging techniques. But this may be a never-ending saga — while having lots of numbers and stats to explore, there are still lots of questions that need answering:

  • We know how structured data is used in the wild now. How will it evolve and how much structured data will be considered enough?
  • Should we expect AMP usage to increase somewhere in the future?
  • How will rel=”sponsored” and rel=“ugc” change the way we write HTML on a daily basis? When coding external links, besides the target=”_blank” and rel=“noopener” combo, we now have to consider the rel=”sponsored” and rel=“ugc” combinations as well.
  • Will we ever learn to always add alt attributes values for images that have a purpose beyond decoration?
  • How many more additional meta tags or attributes will we have to add to a web page to please the search engines? Do we really needed the newly announced data-nosnippet HTML attribute? What’s next, data-allowsnippet?

There are other things we would have liked to address as well, like “time-to-first-byte” (TTFB) values, which correlates highly with ranking; I’d highly recommend HTTP Archive for that. They periodically crawl the top sites on the web and record detailed information about almost everything. According to the latest info, they’ve analyzed 4,565,694 unique websites, with complete Lighthouse scores and having stored particular technologies like jQuery or WordPress for the whole data set. Huge props to Rick Viscomi who does an amazing job as its “steward,” as he likes to call himself.

Performing this large-scale study was a fun ride. We learned a lot and we hope you found the above numbers as interesting as we did. If there is a tag or attribute in particular you would like to see the numbers for, please let me know in the comments below.

Once again, check out the full HTML study results and let me know what you think!

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TripAdvisor says it blocked or removed nearly 1.5 million fake reviews in 2018

Most of the fake reviews that are submitted (91%) are “biased positive reviews.”



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.


Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

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Turo Car-Sharing App Gets $250 Million From IAC To Take On Car Rental Industry

“As we continue to grow and invest in our brand more and more people are sharing their vehicles,” says Turo CEO Andre Haddad. “With our app, you can actually share your car so that you can earn money when you’re not using your car. Last year we ended the year with more than 400,000 vehicles listed and our community is now more than 10 million strong. We’re growing really rapidly. We’re hoping to be in the next few years in the same realm as ride-sharing and home-sharing.”

Andre Haddad, CEO of Turo, discusses the $ 250 million in new funding from IAC, the tremendous growth of their car-sharing app, as well as fights with Enterprise Rent-A-Car which has been trying to stop them in their tracks in an interview on CNBC:

We’re Hoping To Be In The Same Realm As Ride-Sharing

Turo is a great business. There are almost one-and-a-half billion cars around the world and they are idle the vast majority of the time. With our app, you can actually share your car so that you can earn money when you’re not using your car. In the last few months, we’ve seen people earning more than $ 500 a month sharing their car a few days a month. It’s a great opportunity for car owners to share their cars and earn money with them when they’re not using them.

We focus a lot on building trust and safety. We have a great partner with Liberty Mutual to cover all the insurance for both the car owner that is sharing their cars with their guests as well as providing coverage for guests that are driving these cars. It’s all about bringing that new idea to market and building trust and building safety for our community. As we continue to grow and invest in our brand more and more people are sharing their vehicles. Last year we ended the year with more than 400,000 vehicles listed and our community is now more than 10 million strong. We’re growing really rapidly. We’re hoping to be in the next few years in the same realm as ride-sharing and home-sharing.

We’re Very Excited To Partner With IAC

We’re very excited to partner with IAC. IAC is an incredible company that has a lot of expertise in the world of marketplaces. We’re looking forward to collaborating with Joey Levin and the team at IAC to help accelerate our progress and help accelerate our growth. We obviously want to invest more in our expansion. We want to refine our customer experience and we’d like to expand into more markets. Those are the key priorities for us in the next few years.

Over the last few months, we’ve seen that the average host is sharing their vehicle roughly a third of the time, about ten days a month. With that ten days a month they’re earning roughly $ 550 of earnings on a monthly basis. As you can imagine with $ 550 of earnings you can pay for your car payment. It’s an incredible deal for a lot of people who are using the app. Traditional ownership implies utilization that’s less than 10 percent of the time. It’s a very inefficient use of an asset that depreciates really rapidly and has a lot of fixed costs. Turo is a tremendous opportunity for people who want to make better use of their asset.

Enterprise Is Trying To Avoid Competition So We’re Fighting Back

We are faced with a lot of challenges on the regulatory front. Really it’s driven by the traditional rental car industry and by Enterprise in particular. I think the traditional car rental players are concerned that consumers now have a bit more choice. They are concerned that we have probably a better selection, better value, and better convenience as an alternative to the traditional options of car rental. We’ve definitely been battling Enterprise this year. There are 37 states in the United States alone where we have gone into government relation battles with Enterprise. They’re trying to pass laws that will restrict the ability for consumers to share their cars. They’re trying to avoid competition so we’re fighting back. 

We’ve been building a strong coalition of like-minded people. We have great support from the car manufacturing industry and from the insurance industry. We have prevailed in all of these regulatory battles this year. We have prevailed in 25 state regulatory battles last year as well. We’re trying to be very vigilant when it comes to protecting the ability for consumers to share their cars and we’re going to continue to fight these battles.

Turo Car-Sharing App Gets $ 250 Million From IAC To Take On Car Rental Industry – Turo CEO Andre Haddad

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The post Chris Barnes: School Teacher Turned Game Creator Explains How He Launched A Million Dollar Escape Room Board Game Online Subscription Business appeared first on Yaro.Blog.

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