Tag Archive | "Manage"

Try This System to Manage Your Blog Comments Faster (and with Less Stress)

I think the best way to introduce the topic of this post is to remind you that my favorite word is No. At the risk of sounding no-fun, I like rules. If you’re in a position to set rules for any given situation, they can help you reach solutions to issues faster and avoid future
Read More…

The post Try This System to Manage Your Blog Comments Faster (and with Less Stress) appeared first on Copyblogger.


Copyblogger

Posted in IM NewsComments Off

Facebook Creates Inbox for Businesses to Manage Facebook, Messenger and Instagram

Facebook is rolling out a unified inbox for businesses to manages communications across all of their social platforms; Facebook, Messenger and Instagram. This allows businesses to save time by only having to open only one app to send and receive messages.

Now, Facebook says you can reply to Facebook comments, visitor posts, reviews, messages and Instagram comments directly from the updated inbox by tapping on the content you want to answer. Of course, you can still use the apps directly as well.

The unified inbox will roll out to anyone using the business focused Pages Manager mobile app over the next few weeks. Facebook says it will be available for all other devices soon as well. To make it work simply connect your Facebook and Instagram accounts by clicking on the messaging icon at the bottom of your Page while you’re in the Pages Manager App which will then prompt you to login into Instagram.

“The new and improved inbox gives me a quick snapshot of all media channels in an organized and succinct way,” said Nicole Chase, admin of Nicssential Oils. “It cuts down the time I spend on administrative tasks by around 12%, and it allows me to provide more detailed and personalized service.”

Facebook says it will be adding additional features that make sense to make it more useful for business.

screen-shot-2016-11-15-at-3-16-29-pm

Keeping it Personal

In the app you can also click to see a basic profile of anybody you are communicating with including any previous interactions with your company. This lets you keep your messaging more personal and effective.

screen-shot-2016-11-15-at-3-19-18-pm

The post Facebook Creates Inbox for Businesses to Manage Facebook, Messenger and Instagram appeared first on WebProNews.


WebProNews

Posted in IM NewsComments Off

3 Resources to Help You Create, Organize, and Manage Your Content

copyblogger collection - how to sort and use your content

Miriam Lafayette really knows what she’s doing. She absolutely has it together.

Who’s Miriam Lafayette? I made her up while washing dishes, but let’s have her represent a person whose work you love.

You look forward to her new content every time she publishes. You’d be so excited if you could have brunch with her in a fancy cafe. She’d radiate luminous energy as you both sipped tiny cups of espresso and nibbled on delectable cuisine.

But if you did meet Miriam, you’d discover that she’s not always pleased with her creations. Her run-of-the-mill aura is nothing to write home about, and she regards a lot of her content as boring and cliché. Don’t get her started on her mispronunciation of “Lactobacillus acidophilus” in her latest YouTube video — it was so embarrassing.

Miriam’s power simply stems from her unrelenting motivation to help her audience.

This is great news for you, because you can adopt Miriam’s work ethic to develop your authority and build your own audience. You just need to commit to a content production process that works for you.

This week’s Copyblogger Collection is a series of three handpicked articles that will show you:

  • How to use the law of (content) attraction
  • How to create a valuable membership site your audience will love
  • How to tame content creation chaos with rock-solid workflows

And if you’re still skeptical that well-known authorities criticize themselves, check out this video of Adele — yes, the master vocalist, Adele — disparaging her voice.

No one is free from self-doubt, but you can choose to overcome it, like Adele and all the people you personally admire. Now here’s your mini content production course …


The Law of (Content) Attraction

business-law-of-attraction

On the surface, content is a vehicle for attracting prospects and leads who will eventually become customers or clients.

Sonia Simone adds:

“We want to pull the right people in.

And if we’re smart, we want to chase the wrong people away.

But well-designed content marketing has a funny way of opening all kinds of doors you never realized were there.”

Discover how you can use content to open these unexpected doors in Sonia’s article, The Law of (Content) Attraction.


4 Ways to Turn a Mature Membership Site into a Treasured Resource Your Members Will Love

mature-membership-site

Debbie Hodge’s membership site was loaded with tons of value — ebooks, worksheets, audio, video, etc. It was a result of hard work, focus, and dedication. So, what could possibly be problematic?

Her members were intimidated by all the content. They either didn’t know where to start or couldn’t find time to study all of her materials. Debbie knew she had to transform her content library into an accessible resource that members would love and use regularly.

In 4 Ways to Turn a Mature Membership Site into a Treasured Resource Your Members Will Love, she explains the important changes she made. The best part is Debbie’s organizational tips are also helpful if you’re still in the early stages of building a membership site or you plan to build one in the future.


How to Tame Content Creation Chaos with Rock-Solid Workflows

workflows

If you perform the same types of tasks over and over again, you could benefit from simplifying your processes into workflows. Charlie Gilkey defines a workflow as “simply the regular sequence of tasks through which any activity is completed.”

Once you establish a workflow, you’ll notice ways you can be more efficient.

Charlie says:

“Even if you’re not at the point where you can or want to start delegating, using well-defined content marketing workflows makes you a more creative and productive content marketer because the structure they provide helps reduce cognitive load, prevent errors, save time, and maximize the results of the content you work so hard to create.”

He reveals a simple way to set up content marketing workflows in How to Tame Content Creation Chaos with Rock-Solid Workflows.

What do you have to offer?

Don’t let any self-doubt you may have hold you back from sharing your unique skills and areas of expertise. The benefits of helping others outweigh the drawbacks of embarrassing mistakes you may make along the way.

When your content attracts the right people, those individuals will stick around on your good days and bad days because they realize you’re human — just like them.

The post 3 Resources to Help You Create, Organize, and Manage Your Content appeared first on Copyblogger.


Copyblogger

Posted in IM NewsComments Off

Content Marketing: How to manage a change in content on your blog

There are plenty of great content marketing resources to help you start a new blog from scratch. But, what happens when your company undergoes a change in content? Read on to learn insights into how you can manage a change in content on your company blog effectively.
MarketingSherpa Blog

Posted in IM NewsComments Off

7 Ways to Manage Comments on Your Site (Without Losing Your Mind)

Image of Microphone in Front of Audience

Comments.

For some bloggers, they are the fuel that keeps their content creation engines running. For others, they are a nuisance and a hassle — something they try to deal with quickly in order to get to the “real” business of creating content.

As a content creator, dealing with comments is part of your job. And I believe that comments are an incredibly important part of creating (and growing) an engaged online community.

But how do you maintain healthy boundaries on your site while still encouraging lively and engaging discussion? What are the best ways to manage comments in the blogging world today, and what do you need to think about when creating your own comment policies?

1. Moderate your comments.

All of the big blogging platforms allow you to moderate your comments. Adjust your blog settings so your comments come straight to your email inbox, so you can approve them before they get published on the site. That’s the easiest way to keep strict control over the conversation, and make sure things stay civilized.

We’ve all seen sites where the comments are clearly not maintained or controlled in any way, and we’ve seen how quickly the conversation can go from civil to disrespectful, and unwelcoming to flat-out abusive.

Moderate your community conversation, so your blog is a safe and respectful place for people to give their opinions or ask questions.

2. Use a strong spam filter.

Make your job easier by using a strong spam filter. Spam filters keep the creepies and spammers out of your blog (and inbox) and sequestered in a spam folder. Filters don’t catch everything, but they’ll snag most obvious spam comments. Use one, and your comment moderation life will become infinitely easier.

Akismet is my favorite spam filter plugin for WordPress, and it’s built into every default installation.

3. Have a comment policy.

Decide what you will and won’t allow in the discussion on your site, and write it down. Even if the document is just for you, take the time to sit down and write out your thoughts before you open the floodgates.

Consider sharing your policy on your blog, if appropriate. Michael Hyatt and the Huffington Post both have clear comment policies published on their sites, and those policies are enforced.

We also have a published comment policy here at Copyblogger, and those rules are enforced by the editorial team monitoring the comments on each post.

You can also choose the short and concise route — as Tim Ferriss does — and add a short “be cool” section in the footer of each post. Of course, you need to add a line or two describing what “being cool” means to you and your community.

4. Do your best to respond to questions from your audience.

I’m still working on managing this, but Sonia Simone is an absolute pro at it.

She seems to manage to answer every question in a timely and interesting way, and I love reading her comment responses.

She even takes the time to pull out interesting and relevant comments and puts them in standalone Q&A posts — a fantastic way to serve your audience with even more content .

Do you need to respond to every single comment? There are different schools of thought on this question. Some say it’s important to acknowledge every single comment you receive, even if it’s just a quick “Thank you” as a response. Others say it’s okay NOT to respond to every comment, unless the comment includes a question or other remark that really begs a response.

You need to decide what your policy is on answering comments. Keep in mind that your thoughts on this subject may change as your blog audience grows — as you get more comments, you may find you don’t have enough time to respond to every single one.

5. Have limits on what advice you’re willing to give away for free.

If you’re a coach, consultant or other service provider, you need to be clear about how much advice you’re willing to give for free when someone asks a how-to question in the comments section of your site.

You may decide that you’re willing to address questions that dip into your service provider knowledge, as long as the question is relevant and useful for your entire audience. Or you might decide not to give away any advice that your clients would normally pay for.

But either way, you’ll need to figure out a diplomatic way to refer people to your “Contact” or “Services” page when it’s time to take the discussion offline (and possibly set up a consultation or coaching appointment with you).

As with everything in comment moderation (and in life) — decide what your boundaries are, and stick with them.

6. Don’t put up with trolls, bullies, abusive language or threats.

It’s your site, and you decide what you will and will not allow someone to publish on your posts. You are under NO obligation to publish every single comment that people submit, and you needn’t allow anyone to bully, harass, or push you around.

That said, a little healthy discussion is a good thing, so you shouldn’t arbitrarily delete any commenter who disagrees with you. If they make their point in a respectful way, it’s okay to have a little contention on your site. It might even be a good thing.

In other words, embrace thoughtful, respectful criticism.

Our post on grammar mistakes, 15 Grammar Goofs That Make You Look Silly, received a healthy amount of debate and discourse in the comments — and it’s also the all-time most popular post on our site. So don’t be afraid of a little heated discussion on your blog.

7. Take care of your guest authors.

Set each guest up as a user in WordPress, and have WordPress email that guest each time one of their posts receives a new comment. It’s an easy way to let your guest writers engage with their posts (and keep track of which comments they have replied to).

When you invite guest bloggers to publish posts on your site, it’s also your job to make sure no one abuses them. One of the things I love about Copyblogger (especially back in my guest posting days, when I was nervous about answering hyper-critical or trollish comments) is that Brian and Sonia would jump in on the rare occasion that a commenter was disrespectful or rude.

Your policy should always be to militantly protect your guest authors — they are your guests, after all.

Over to you …

Hopefully you’ve gotten some ideas for coming up with your own policies and rules about managing the discussion on your site (and I’ve made it a little easier for you to moderate your comments in a way that works for you AND your community.

Some popular bloggers have recently decided to drop public comments from their posts. Others keep them open, but employ a strict moderation policy that leaves no room for bullies or trolls.

What are your rules about comments on your site (and what stories do you have to share about commenting gone awry?)

See you in the comments?

About the Author: Beth Hayden is a Senior Staff Writer for Copyblogger Media. Get more from Beth on Twitter and Pinterest.

Related Stories

Copyblogger

Posted in IM NewsComments Off

7 Ways to Manage Comments on Your Site (Without Losing Your Mind)

Image of Microphone in Front of Audience

Comments.

For some bloggers, they are the fuel that keeps their content creation engines running. For others, they are a nuisance and a hassle — something they try to deal with quickly in order to get to the “real” business of creating content.

As a content creator, dealing with comments is part of your job. And I believe that comments are an incredibly important part of creating (and growing) an engaged online community.

But how do you maintain healthy boundaries on your site while still encouraging lively and engaging discussion? What are the best ways to manage comments in the blogging world today, and what do you need to think about when creating your own comment policies?

1. Moderate your comments.

All of the big blogging platforms allow you to moderate your comments. Adjust your blog settings so your comments come straight to your email inbox, so you can approve them before they get published on the site. That’s the easiest way to keep strict control over the conversation, and make sure things stay civilized.

We’ve all seen sites where the comments are clearly not maintained or controlled in any way, and we’ve seen how quickly the conversation can go from civil to disrespectful, and unwelcoming to flat-out abusive.

Moderate your community conversation, so your blog is a safe and respectful place for people to give their opinions or ask questions.

2. Use a strong spam filter.

Make your job easier by using a strong spam filter. Spam filters keep the creepies and spammers out of your blog (and inbox) and sequestered in a spam folder. Filters don’t catch everything, but they’ll snag most obvious spam comments. Use one, and your comment moderation life will become infinitely easier.

Akismet is my favorite spam filter plugin for WordPress, and it’s built into every default installation.

3. Have a comment policy.

Decide what you will and won’t allow in the discussion on your site, and write it down. Even if the document is just for you, take the time to sit down and write out your thoughts before you open the floodgates.

Consider sharing your policy on your blog, if appropriate. Michael Hyatt and the Huffington Post both have clear comment policies published on their sites, and those policies are enforced.

We also have a published comment policy here at Copyblogger, and those rules are enforced by the editorial team monitoring the comments on each post.

You can also choose the short and concise route — as Tim Ferriss does — and add a short “be cool” section in the footer of each post. Of course, you need to add a line or two describing what “being cool” means to you and your community.

4. Do your best to respond to questions from your audience.

I’m still working on managing this, but Sonia Simone is an absolute pro at it.

She seems to manage to answer every question in a timely and interesting way, and I love reading her comment responses.

She even takes the time to pull out interesting and relevant comments and puts them in standalone Q&A posts — a fantastic way to serve your audience with even more content .

Do you need to respond to every single comment? There are different schools of thought on this question. Some say it’s important to acknowledge every single comment you receive, even if it’s just a quick “Thank you” as a response. Others say it’s okay NOT to respond to every comment, unless the comment includes a question or other remark that really begs a response.

You need to decide what your policy is on answering comments. Keep in mind that your thoughts on this subject may change as your blog audience grows — as you get more comments, you may find you don’t have enough time to respond to every single one.

5. Have limits on what advice you’re willing to give away for free.

If you’re a coach, consultant or other service provider, you need to be clear about how much advice you’re willing to give for free when someone asks a how-to question in the comments section of your site.

You may decide that you’re willing to address questions that dip into your service provider knowledge, as long as the question is relevant and useful for your entire audience. Or you might decide not to give away any advice that your clients would normally pay for.

But either way, you’ll need to figure out a diplomatic way to refer people to your “Contact” or “Services” page when it’s time to take the discussion offline (and possibly set up a consultation or coaching appointment with you).

As with everything in comment moderation (and in life) — decide what your boundaries are, and stick with them.

6. Don’t put up with trolls, bullies, abusive language or threats.

It’s your site, and you decide what you will and will not allow someone to publish on your posts. You are under NO obligation to publish every single comment that people submit, and you needn’t allow anyone to bully, harass, or push you around.

That said, a little healthy discussion is a good thing, so you shouldn’t arbitrarily delete any commenter who disagrees with you. If they make their point in a respectful way, it’s okay to have a little contention on your site. It might even be a good thing.

In other words, embrace thoughtful, respectful criticism.

Our post on grammar mistakes, 15 Grammar Goofs That Make You Look Silly, received a healthy amount of debate and discourse in the comments — and it’s also the all-time most popular post on our site. So don’t be afraid of a little heated discussion on your blog.

7. Take care of your guest authors.

Set each guest up as a user in WordPress, and have WordPress email that guest each time one of their posts receives a new comment. It’s an easy way to let your guest writers engage with their posts (and keep track of which comments they have replied to).

When you invite guest bloggers to publish posts on your site, it’s also your job to make sure no one abuses them. One of the things I love about Copyblogger (especially back in my guest posting days, when I was nervous about answering hyper-critical or trollish comments) is that Brian and Sonia would jump in on the rare occasion that a commenter was disrespectful or rude.

Your policy should always be to militantly protect your guest authors — they are your guests, after all.

Over to you …

Hopefully you’ve gotten some ideas for coming up with your own policies and rules about managing the discussion on your site (and I’ve made it a little easier for you to moderate your comments in a way that works for you AND your community.

Some popular bloggers have recently decided to drop public comments from their posts. Others keep them open, but employ a strict moderation policy that leaves no room for bullies or trolls.

What are your rules about comments on your site (and what stories do you have to share about commenting gone awry?)

See you in the comments?

About the Author: Beth Hayden is a Senior Staff Writer for Copyblogger Media. Get more from Beth on Twitter and Pinterest.

Related Stories

Copyblogger

Posted in IM NewsComments Off

How to Use a Military Concept to Manage SEO in a Data-Scarcity Reality

The OODA loop concept – Observe, Orient, Decide, Act – is one way to face uncertainty and make educated decisions based on partial or no data. Here are the basic steps in the framework and how to apply it to advance your SEO and content campaigns.
Search Engine Watch – Latest

Posted in IM NewsComments Off

Manage Your Reputation

How much value do you place on your good reputation?

If we looked at it purely from a financial point of view, our reputations help us get work, make money, and be more influential. On a personal level, a good name is something of which you can be proud. It is something tangible that makes you feel good.

You’re Everywhere

As it becomes increasingly easy for people to make their feelings known and published far and wide, many businesses are implementing reputation management strategies to help protect their good name.

This area used to be the domain of big business, who employed teams of PR and legal specialists to nurture, defend and promote established brands. Unlike small business, which didn’t have to worry about what someone on the other side of the country might have said about them as it didn’t affect business in their locality, larger entities were exposed nationally, and often internationally. It was also difficult for an individual to spread their grievance, unless it was picked up by mainstream media.

These days, everything is instant and international. Those with a grievance can be heard far and wide, without the need to get media involved. We hear about problems with brands across the other side of the country, or the world, just as easily as we hear about them in our own regions, or market niches. If someone is getting hammered in the search industry, you and I probably both hear about it, at roughly the same time. And so will everyone else.

Media stories don’t even have to be true, of course. False information travels just as fast, if not faster, than truth. Given the potential, it’s a wonder reputation problems don’t occur more often that they do.

This is why reputation management is becoming increasingly important for smaller firms and individuals. No matter how good you are at what you do, it’s impossible to please everyone all the time, so it’s quite possible someone could damage your good name at some point.

Much of the reputation management area is obvious and common sense, but certainly worth taking time to consider, especially if you haven’t looked at reputation issues up until now. When people search on your name, do they find an accurate representation of who you are and what you’re about? Is the information outdated? Are you seen in the same places as you competition? How does their reputation compare to yours?

Also, some marketers offer reputation monitoring and management as an add-one service to clients so it can be a potential new revenue stream for those offering consultancy services.

The Indelible Nature Of The Internet

In some respects, I’m glad the internet – as we know it – wasn’t around when I was at school. There were far too many regrettable nights that, these days, would be recorded from various angles on smartphones and uploaded to YouTube before anyone can say “that isn’t mine, officer!”

You’ve got to feel sorry for some of the kids today. Kids being kids, they sometimes do stupid things, but these days a record of stupidity is likely to hang around “forever”. Perhaps their grand-kids will get a laugh one day. Perhaps the recruiter won’t.

Something similar could happen to you, or your firm. One careless employee saying the wrong thing and the record could show up in search engines for a long time. If you’re building a brand, whether personal or related to a business, you need to look after it, nurture it, and defend it, if need be. We’ll look at a few practical ways to do so.

On the flip side, of course, the internet can help establish and spread your good reputation very quickly. We’ll also look at ways to push your good reputation.

Modern Media Is A Conversation

People talk.

These days, no matter how big a firm is, they can’t hide behind PR and receptionists. If they don’t want to join the conversation, so be it – it will go on all around them, regardless. If they aren’t part of it, then they risk the conversation being dictated by others.

So a big part of online reputation management is about getting involved in the conversation, and framing it, where possible i.e. have the conversation on your terms.

Be Proactive

Most us haven’t got time to constantly monitor everything that might be said about us or our brands. One of the most cost-effective ways to manage reputation is to get out in front of problems before they arise. If there is enough good things said about you, then the occasional critical voice won’t carry as much weight by comparison.

The first step is to audit your current position. Search on your name and/or brand. What do you see in the top ten? Do the results reflect what you’re about? Is there anything negative showing up? If so, can you respond to it by way of a comment section? This is the exact same information your customers will see, of course, when they look you up.

If you’re not seeing accurate content, you may need to update or publish more appropriate content on your own sites, and those sites that come up in the top ten, where possible. More aggressive SEO approaches involve flooding the SERPs with positive content in an attempt to push down any negative stories below the fold so they are less likely to be seen. This is probably not quite as effective as addressing the underlying issues that caused the negative press in the first place, unless the criticisms were malicious, in which case, game on.

Next, conduct the same set of searches on your competitors. How does their reputation compare? Are they being seen in places you aren’t? Are they getting positive press mentions that you could get, too? How does your reputation stack up, relatively speaking?

Listen

You can monitor mentions using services such as Google Alerts, Hootsuite, Tweetdeck, and various other tools. There’s another big list of tools here. Google runs “Me On The Web” as part of the Google Dashboard.

Monitor trends related to your industry. Get involved in fast breaking, popular trends and discussions. Be seen where potential customers would expect to see you. The more other people see you engaged on important issues, in a positive light, the more credibility you’re banking for the future. If you build up a high volume of “good stuff”, any occasional critical voice will likely get lost in the noise, rather than stand out. A lot of reputation management has to do with building positive PR ahead of any negatives that may arise later. You should be everywhere your customers expect to see you.

This is a common tactic used by authors selling on Amazon. They “encourage” good reviews, typically by handing out free review copies to friends, in order to stack the positive review side in their favor. The occasional negative review may hurt them, but not quite as much as if the number of negative reviews match the number of positive reviews. Some of them overdo it, of course, as twenty 5 star reviews, and nothing else, looks somewhat suspicious. When it comes to PR, it’s best to be believable!

Engage

Create a policy for engagement, for yourself, and other people who work for you. Keep it simple, and principle based, as principles are easier to remember and apply. For example, a good principle is to post in haste only if what you are saying is positive. If something is negative, pause. Leave it for a few hours. If it still feels right, then post. It’s so easy to post in haste, and then regret it for years afterwards.

Seek feedback often. Ask people how you’re doing, especially if you suspect you’ve annoyed someone or let them down in some way. If you give people permission to vent where you control the environment it means they are less likely to let off steam somewhere else. It may also highlight potential trouble-spots in your process, that you can fix and thus avoid repeats in future. I’ve run sites where the sales process has occasionally broken down, and had customers complain. It happens. I make a point of letting them vent, giving them more than they originally ordered, and apologizing to them for the problems. Not only does going over-and-above expectations prevent negative press, it has often turned disgruntled customers into advocates. They’ve increased their business, and referred others. Pretty simple, right, but good customer service is all part of the reputation management process.

Figure out who the influential people are in your industry and try and get onside with them. In a crisis, they may well help you out, especially if they see you’re being hard done by. If influential names weigh in on your behalf, this can easily marginalize the person who is being critical.

Security

Secure your stuff. Check out this awful story on Wired:

In the space of one hour, my entire digital life was destroyed. First my Google account was taken over, then deleted. Next my Twitter account was compromised, and used as a platform to broadcast racist and homophobic messages. And worst of all, my AppleID account was broken into, and my hackers used it to remotely erase all of the data on my iPhone, iPad, and MacBook.

Explaining what happened and getting it published on Wired is a pretty good crisis management response, of course. When you look up “Mat Horan”, you find that article. Separate your social media business and personal profiles. Secure your mobile phone. Check that your privacy settings are correct across social media. Simple stuff that goes a long way to protecting your existing reputation.

What To Do If You Do Hit Trouble

We can’t please everyone, all the time.

A critical factor is speed. If you spot trouble, get into the conversation early. This can prevent the problem festering and gathering it’s own momentum. However, before you leap in, make sure you understand the issue. Ask “what do these people want to happen that is not currently happening?”.

Also consider who is saying it. What’s their reach? If it’s just a ranter on noname.blogspot.com, or a troll attempt, it’s probably not worth your time, and engaging trolls is counter-productive. Someone influential, of course, requires kid glove treatment. One common tactic, especially if the situation is escalating beyond your control, is to try and take it offline and reach resolution that way. You can then go back to the online conversation once it has been resolved, rather than having the entire firefight a matter of indelible public record.

It’s illegal for people to defame you, so you could also consider legal action if the problem is bad enough. You could also consider engaging some PR help, particularly if the problem occurs in mainstream media. PR can be a bit hit and miss, but reputable PR professionals tend to have extensive networks of contacts, so may get you seen where it might be difficult for you to do so on your own. There are also dedicated reputation management companies, such as reputation.com, reputationchanger.com, and reputationmanagementagency.com who handle monitoring and public relations functions. NB: Included for illustration purposes. We have no relationship with these firms.

Practical examples of constructive responses to negative criticism can often be seen in the Amazon reviews.

For example, a writer can respond to any reviews made about their book. A good approach to negative statements is to thank the reviewer for taking the time to provide feedback, regardless of what they said, and address the issue raised in a calm, informative manner. Future customers will see this, of course, which provides yet another opportunity to sway their opinion. One great example I’ve seen was when the writer did all of the above AND offered the person providing the negative review an hour of free consulting so the reviewer could get the specific information he felt he was missing! One downside of this strategy, however, might be more copycat negative reviews aimed at getting the reviewer free consulting!

The same principle applies to any negative comment in other contexts. When a reader sees your reply, they get editorial balance that would otherwise be missing.

It’s obvious, yet important, stuff. If you’ve got examples of how you’ve handled reputation issues in the past, or your ideas on how best to manage reputation going forward, please add them to the comments to help others.

I’m sure they’ll remember you for it :)

Categories: 

SEO Book.com

Posted in IM NewsComments Off

CrankyAds Can Now Manage Your Google AdSense

Just over a month ago, CrankyAds (my startup with two partners, Walter and Mick) made a huge shift in how we are developing our business and in particular, how we prioritise and create new features for our service.

I’ll write more about why we made the shift and how it was different from what we were doing previously, in my … Read the rest of this entry »

Entrepreneurs-Journey.com by Yaro Starak

Posted in IM NewsComments Off

6 Tools to Manage Your Twitter Followers

Managing Twitter followers can become a time consuming task, taking time away from actually sending messages and growing your influence. Here are a few free and paid tools that will save you time and provide all the important data you need.
Search Engine Watch – Latest

Posted in IM NewsComments Off

Advert