Tag Archive | "Full"

Autonomous Driving for Trucks Will Happen First, Says Full Truck Alliance CFO

“Our view is that the commercialization of autonomous driving for passenger vehicles will probably take a bit longer than people would think,” says Richard Zhang, CFO of Full Truck Alliance. “We think the commercialization of autonomous driving for trucks will probably take place a lot sooner than it will take place in the passenger car vehicle sector.”

Full Truck Alliance is a multi-billion dollar valued company that is becoming the Uber of trucks throughout China. The fragmentation of the trucking industry in China between independent truckers and shippers has resulted in an empty load rate of over 40 percent, about four times higher than in the United States. The Full Truck Alliance app and online platform connects shippers to truckers in real-time enabling huge reductions in empty loads.

Richard Zhang, CFO of Full Truck Alliance based in China, discussed the company’s future in an interview on CNBC International TV this morning:

Full Truck Alliance in China is the Uber for Trucks

The problem we’re trying to solve is very simple because there are high inefficiencies between matching with the truck drivers and also matching with the shippers. The empty load rate in the US is only ten percent while the empty load rate in China is 40 percent. The empty load rate is very similar to the vacancy rate in the hotel business. The reason is that the market here is highly fragmented. You have highly fragmented truck drivers and highly fragmented shippers, lots of SMEs.

Before we came into existence the matching between the truck drivers and shippers were taking place across a thousand offline marketplaces in China. What we have been trying to do is bring that offline marketplace online and use our algorithms in the back office to match automatically the truck drivers and the shippers. We are trying to reduce that empty load rate to well below 40 percent.

Monetization Via Membership and Uber-Like Fees

Our monetization strategy for Full Truck Alliance is as a product of a merger between two companies, Truck Alliance and also Yunmanman a little over a year ago. Post-merger we started monetization and the monetization takes place in two ways. Number one is we are charging a membership fee for the shippers and also very similar to Uber or DiDi we’re charging a take rate on the transactions themselves.

We were very close to achieving our 2018 profit objective. We are actually very marginally close to break-even at the current moment and we have no doubt that we’re going be making earnings in 2019.

Autonomous Driving for Trucks Will Happen First

Our view is that the commercialization of autonomous driving for passenger vehicles will probably take a bit longer than people would think. We think the commercialization of autonomous driving for trucks will probably take place a lot sooner than it will take place in the passenger car vehicle sector. Therefore we are deploying a certain amount of resources into that sector in the form of investment.

We have decided to be a strategic investor in an autonomous driving truck company for them to actually develop that technology and for us to actually use. The mandate for the partner is to actually put a fleet on the road in China to start working with our shippers in the next 12 to 24 months. That’s our mandate and so it depends on how successful they’re going to be at executing our strategy.

The post Autonomous Driving for Trucks Will Happen First, Says Full Truck Alliance CFO appeared first on WebProNews.


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The Ultimate Cheat Sheet for Taking Full Control of Your Google Knowledge Panels

Posted by MiriamEllis

They say you can’t squeeze blood out of a turnip, but when the turnip (and your biggest potential competitor) is Google, the lifeblood of the local business locations you market could depend on knowing where to take control.

As Google acts to confine ever-more stages of the local consumer journey within their own interface, local enterprises need to assume as much control as possible over the aspects of the Google Knowledge Panel that they can directly or indirectly influence.

This cheat sheet is your fast track to squeezing the most you can out of what Google is still offering.

How Google changed from local business benefactor to competitor

It may not come naturally, at first, to think of Google as a competitor. For many years in the local space, their offering of significant free screen real estate to any eligible local enterprise was like a gift. But, in their understandable quest for maximum profitability, Google is increasingly monetizing their local product, while at the same time giving more space to public sentiment when it comes to your brand’s reputation.

As this trend continues, your business needs to know which features of the Google Knowledge Panel that appear when searchers seek you by name can be controlled. You’ll also want to know which of these features has the most potential to influence rankings and consumers. We’ll explore both topics, as follows.


Core features on most Google Knowledge Panels

Different industries have different Knowledge Panel features, but the following graphic and key represent the elements that commonly pertain to most business categories. Each numbered feature will be described and designated as controllable “yes” or controllable “no” in the accompanying key. Some features will be labeled controllable “partly”, with notes explaining that designation. You will also discover pro tips for best practices, where appropriate.

1.) Photos & videos

When clicked on, this takes the user to both owner and user-generated photos in a set. Photos significantly impact CTR. Photos must be monitored for spam.

On mobile, there is a separate tab for photos, beyond the initial profile images.

Pro Tip: Videos can also be posted to your photos section, but try to post more than 2 videos so that you’ll get a separate mobile video subtab.

Controllable?

Partly; this is both an owner and crowdsourced element.

2.) Maps

When clicked on, this takes the user to the Maps-based Knowledge Panel accompanied by map with pin. Be sure your map marker is correctly placed.

Controllable?

Partly; owner can correct misplaced map marker, but users can submit placement edits, too.

3.) Exterior photo

When clicked on, this takes the user to an interactive Google Street View visual of the business.

*On mobile, no separate space is given to exterior photos.

Controllable?

Partly; owner can correct misplaced map marker.

4.) Business name

This must reflect the real-world name of the business and be formatted according to Google’s guidelines.

Pro Tip: If your enterprise is a Service Area Business, like a plumbing franchise with no storefronts, your name should match what appears on your website.

Controllable?

Yes; owner provides, though public can edit.

5.) Maps star

When clicked on, this gives users the option to either save the location to their map, or to view the location on Maps. Very little has been published about this easily overlooked feature. Users who star a location then see it as a star in the future on their maps. They are a form of “lists.” It might be posited that a business which many have starred might see some form of ranking boost, but this is speculative.

*On mobile, there is no Maps star. There is a “save” icon instead.

Controllable?

No.

6.) Website button

When clicked on, this takes the user to the website of the company. In multi-practitioner and multi-location scenarios, care must be taken that this link points to the right URL.

Pro Tip: Large, multi-location enterprises should consider pointing each location’s Knowledge Panel to the right landing page. According to a new study, when both brand- and location-specific pages exist, 85% of all consumer engagement takes place on the local pages (e.g., Facebook Local Pages, local landing pages). A minority of impressions and engagement (15%) happen on national or brand pages.

Controllable?

Yes; owner provides, though public can edit.

7.) Directions button

When clicked on, this takes the user to the Maps-based widget that enables them to designate a starting point and receive driving directions and traffic alerts. Be sure to check directions for each location of your enterprise to protect consumers from misdirection.

Controllable?

Partly; owner and the public can report incorrect directions.

8.) Review stars and count

The star portion of the section is not an average; it’s something like a “Bayesian average.” The count (which is sometimes inaccurate), when clicked, takes you to the separate review interface overlay where all reviews can be read. Review count and sentiment are believed to impact local rankings, but the degree of impact is speculative. Review sentiment is believed to highly impact conversions.

Pro Tip: While Google is fine with your business asking for reviews, never offer incentives of any kind in exchange for them. Also, avoid bulk review requests, as they can result in your reviews being filtered out.

Controllable?

Partly; owner can encourage, monitor, thumb up, and respond to reviews, as well as reporting spam reviews; public can also flag reviews as well as thumbing them up.

9.) Editorial summary

This is generated by Google via unconfirmed processes and is meant to provide a summarized description of the business.

Controllable?

No.

10.) Address

For brick-and-mortar businesses, this line must display a genuine, physical address. For service area businesses, this line should simply show the city/state for the business, based on hide-address settings in the GMB dashboard.

Controllable?

Yes; owner provides, though public can edit.

11.) Hours

When clicked on, a dropdown displays the complete hours of operation for the business. Care must be taken to accurately reflect seasonal and holiday hours.

Controllable?

Yes; owner provides, though public can edit.

12.) Phone

This number must connect as directly as possible to the location. On desktop, this number can be clicked, which will dial it up via Hangouts. A business can add more than one phone number to their GMB dashboard, but it will not display publicly.

*On mobile, there is no phone number displayed; just a call icon.

Pro Tip: The most popular solution to the need to implement call tracking is to list the call tracking number as the primary number and the store location number as the additional number. Provided that the additional number matches what Google finds on the website, no serious problems have been reported from utilizing this strategy since it was first suggested in 2017.

Controllable?

Yes; owner provides, though public can edit.

13.) Suggest an edit link

This is the most visible vehicle for the public to report problems with listing data. It can be used positively or maliciously.

Controllable?

No.

14.) Google Posts

Introduced in 2017, this form of microblogging enables businesses to post short content with links, imagery, and video right to their Knowledge Panels. It’s believed use of Google Posts may impact local rank. Each Google post lasts for 7 days, unless its content is designated as an “event,” in which case the post will remain live until the event ends. Google Posts are created and controlled in the GMB dashboard. Google has been experimenting with placement of posts, including showing them in Maps.

Pro Tip: Posts can be up to 1500 characters, but 150–350 characters is advisable. The ideal Posts image size is 750×750. Images smaller than 250×250 aren’t accepted. Posts can feature events, products, offers, bookings, phone numbers, 30-second videos, and links to learn more. Images can contain text that can prompt users to take a specific action like visiting the website to book an appointment, and early days experiments show that this approach can significantly boost conversions.

Controllable?

Yes.

15.) Know this place?

When clicked on, this feature enables anyone to contribute attribution information to a place. A wizard asks the user a variety of questions, such as “does this place have onsite parking?”

Pro Tip: Google has let Top Contributors to its forum know that it’s okay for businesses to contribute knowledge to their own Know This Place section.

Controllable?

Partly; both owner and public can add attribution via this link.

16.) Google Questions & Answers

Introduced in 2017, this crowdsourced Q&A functionality can be contributed to directly by businesses. Businesses can post their own FAQs and answer them, as well as responding to consumer questions. Q&As with the most thumbs up appear up front on the Knowledge Panel. The “Ask a Question” button facilitates queries, and the “See all questions” link takes you to an overlay popup showing all queries. This is becoming an important new hub of social interactivity, customer support, and may be a ranking factor. Google Q&A must be monitored for spam and abuse.

Controllable?

Partly; both owner and public can contribute.

17.) Send to your phone

Introduced in 2016, this feature enables desktop users to send a place to their phone for use on the go. It’s possible that a place that has been sent to a lot of phones might be deemed popular by Google, and therefore, more relevant.

*On mobile, this option doesn’t exist, for obvious reasons.

Controllable?

No

18.) Review snippets

This section of the Knowledge Panel features three excerpts from Google-based reviews, selected by an unknown process. The “View all Google reviews” link takes the user to an overlay popup featuring all reviews. Owners can respond to reviews via this popup or the GMB dashboard. Review count, sentiment, velocity, and owner response activity are all speculative ranking factors. Reviews must be monitored for spam and abuse.

Pro Tip: In your Google My Business dashboard, you can and should be responding to your reviews. Surveys indicate that 40% of consumers expect businesses to respond, and more than half expect a response within three days, but it’s best to respond within a day. If the review is negative, a good response can win back about 35% of customers. Even if you can’t win back the other 65%, a good response serves to demonstrate to the entire consumer public that your business is ethical and accountable.

Controllable?

Partly; both owner and public can contribute.

19.) Write a Review button

This is the button consumers click to write a review, leave a star rating and upload review imagery. Clicking it takes you to a popup for that purpose.

*On mobile, this is formatted differently, with a large display of five empty stars labeled “Rate and Review.”

Controllable?

No.

20.) Add a Photo button

This button takes you to the photo upload interface. Third-party photos must be monitored for spam and abuse. Photos are believed to impact CTR.

*On mobile, this CTA is absent from the initial interface.

Controllable?

Partly; brands can’t control what photos users upload, but they can report inappropriate images.

21.) View all Google reviews

This link brings up the pop-up interface on desktop containing all of the reviews a business has received.

Pro Tip: Enterprises should continuously monitor reviews for signs of emerging problems at specific locations. Sentiment analysis software is available to help identify issues as they arise.

Controllable?

Partly; brands can’t control the content reviewers post, but they can control the quality of experiences, as well as responding to reviews.

22.) Description

After years of absence, the business description field has returned and is an excellent place to showcase the highlights of specific locations of your enterprise. Descriptions can be up to 750 characters in length.

Pro Tip: Do call out desirable aspects of your business in the description, but don’t use it to announce sales or promotions, as that’s a violation of the guidelines.

Controllable?

Yes.

23.) People Also Search For

This section typically shows brand competitors, chosen by Google. If clicked on, the user is taking to a Local Finder-type view of these competing businesses, accompanied by a map.

Controllable?

No.

24.) Feedback

This link supports suggested public edits of the Knowledge Panel, which Google can accept or reject.

Controllable?

Partly; brands can’t control what edits the public suggests. Brands can use this feature to suggest edits, too, but there are typically better ways to do so.


Additional features on some Google Knowledge Panels

Some industries have unique Knowledge Panel features. We’ll list the most common of these here:

Price summary

This is meant to be an overview of general pricing.

Controllable?

Partly; this is both an owner and crowdsourced element.

Lengthier editorial summary

Shown in addition to showing the category of the business, this editorial summary is created by Google by unconfirmed processes.

Controllable?

No.

Menu link

A somewhat complex feature, these can link to third-party menus, or can be generated directly by the owner in the GMB dashboard for some businesses.

Controllable?

Partly; owner can control the menu URL and content in some cases.

Reviews from around the web

This features a rating summary and links to relevant third-party review sources, determined by Google.

Controllable?

Partly; owners can’t dictate which 3rd parties Google chooses, but they can work to build up positive reviews on featured sources.

Critic reviews

These are chosen by Google, and stem from “professional” review platforms.

Controllable?

No.

Popular times

This information is drawn from users who have opted into Google Location History. It’s meant to help users plan visits. It’s conceivable that this could be utilized as a ranking factor.

Controllable?

No

Booking

This “see schedule” button takes the user to Maps-based display of the company’s schedule, with the ability to reserve an appointment.

Controllable?

Yes

Groupon ads

This controversial element found on some Knowledge Panels appears to feature Groupon being allowed to advertise on brands’ listings without owner consent.

Controllable?

No

Local business URLs

There are a variety of additional URLs that can either be added to the GMB dashboard or stem from third parties. These URLs can represent menus, ordering, booking, reservations, and product searches.

Controllable?

Partly; owner can add some additional URLs, but some come from 3rd parties

Google Messaging

This is Google’s live chat feature that lets clients directly message you.

Controllable?

Yes

Hotel Knowledge Panels

Hotel Knowledge Panels are practically a completely different animal. They can offer much more detailed booking options, more segmented review sentiment, various ads, and deals.

Controllable?

Mostly; owners have a variety of features they can enable, though some are out of their control.

Prioritizing Google Knowledge Panel features for maximum impact

Every location of an enterprise faces a unique competitive scenario, depending on its market. What may “move the needle” for some business locations may be relatively ineffectual in others. Nevertheless, when dealing with a large number of locations, it can be helpful to have a general order of tasks to prioritize. We’ll offer a basic list that can be used to guide work, based on elements that most important to get right first:

✓ Guidelines

Be sure all listings are eligible for inclusion in Google’s product and adhere to Google’s guidelines, both for the listings, themselves, and for reviews.

✓ Duplicates

Identify duplicate Google My Business listings using Moz Check Listing or Moz Local and handle them appropriately so that ranking strength isn’t being divided up or thwarted by multiple listings for the same location.

✓ NAP

Create a spreadsheet containing company-approved name, address, phone number and website URL data for each location and be sure each Google listing accurately reflects this information.

✓ Category

Without the right primary category, you can’t rank for your most important searches. Look at the category your top competitors are using and, if it’s right for you, use it. Avoid repetition in category choices (i.e. don’t choose both “auto dealership” and “Toyota dealership”).

✓ Map markers

It may seem obvious, but do an audit of all your locations to be sure the Map marker is in the right place.

✓ Reviews

Acquire, monitor and respond to reviews for all locations on a daily basis, with the goal of demonstration accessibility and accountability. Reviews are part-and-parcel of your customer service program.

✓ Images

Images can significantly influence clickthrough rates. Be sure yours are as persuasive and professional as possible.

✓ Posts

Make maximum use of the opportunity to microblog right on your Knowledge Panel.

✓ Ability to implement call tracking numbers

Analysis is so critical to the success of any enterprise. By using a call tracking number as the primary number on each location’s Knowledge Panel, you can glean important data about how users are interacting with your assets.

✓ Q&A

Post and answer your own company FAQ, and monitor this feature on a regular basis to emphasize the accessibility of your customer support.

✓ Product/service menus

Where appropriate, a thorough menu deepens the experience a user can have with your Knowledge Panel.

✓ Bookings

Depending on your industry, you may find you have to pay Google for bookings to remain competitive. Alternatively, experiment with Google Posts image text to pull users from the Knowledge Panel over to your own booking widget.

✓ Attributes

Add every appropriate attribute that’s available for your business category to deepen Google’s understanding of what you offer.

Summing up

Each element of a Google Knowledge Panel offers a different level of control to your Enterprise, from no control to total control. Rather than worry about things you can’t manage, focus on the powers you do have to:

  1. Create positive real-world consumer experiences by dint of your excellent customer service
  2. Prompt consumers to help you reflect those experiences in your Knowledge Panel
  3. Monitor, track, and interact with consumers as much as possible on your Knowledge Panel
  4. Publish rich and accurate information to the Knowledge Panel, knowing that Google wants to retain as many users as possible within this interface

Local enterprises are in a time of transition in 2018, moving from a past in which the bulk of customer experiences could be controlled either in-store or on the brand’s website, to a present in which Google is successfully inter-positioning itself an informational and transactional agent.

Google wants your Knowledge Panel to work for them, but with the right approach to the elements you can control, you still have a significant say in how it works for you.

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How To Transition From Full Time Employment To Full Time Entrepreneurship

 [ Download MP3 | Transcript | iTunes | Soundcloud | Raw RSS ] Over the years I’ve heard hundreds of stories from people who made the big leap, leaving the world of employment to become full-time entrepreneurs. The stories range from the incredibly daring people who quit their jobs without having any savings, or […]

The post How To Transition From Full Time Employment To Full Time Entrepreneurship appeared first on Yaro.Blog.

Entrepreneurs-Journey.com by Yaro Starak

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Dan And Brandon: How The Founders Of Zen Dude Fitness Make A Full Time Income Sharing Jump Rope Videos On YouTube

[ Download MP3 | Transcript | iTunes | Soundcloud | Raw RSS ] Dan and Brandon became best friends after a podcast interview led to the realization that they live in the same building. The two guys have a lot in common, including having played the same position for their college…

The post Dan And Brandon: How The Founders Of Zen Dude Fitness Make A Full Time Income Sharing Jump Rope Videos On YouTube appeared first on Yaro.blog.

Entrepreneurs-Journey.com by Yaro Starak

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If You Start A Business Today How Long Will It Take To Earn A Full Time Income?

If your goal is to earn a stable full-time income from your own online business within 12 months, then now is the time to take things seriously. What you start building today, will bear fruit next year, probably LATE next year at best. I’m being brutally honest here — there…

The post If You Start A Business Today How Long Will It Take To Earn A Full Time Income? appeared first on Yaro.blog.

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The 2018 Search Engine Land Award winners: The full roster of this year’s search rock stars & superheroes

The SEO and SEM community recognized the industry’s top performers last night during the SMX Advanced Conference in Seattle.



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.


Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

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How To Transition From Full Time Employment To Full Time Entrepreneurship

 [ Download MP3 | Transcript | iTunes | Soundcloud | Raw RSS ] Over the years I’ve heard hundreds of stories from people who made the big leap, leaving the world of employment to become full-time entrepreneurs. The stories range from the incredibly daring people who quit their jobs…

The post How To Transition From Full Time Employment To Full Time Entrepreneurship appeared first on Yaro.blog.

Entrepreneurs-Journey.com by Yaro Starak

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Dan And Brandon: How The Founders Of Zen Dude Fitness Make A Full Time Income Sharing Jump Rope Videos On YouTube

[ Download MP3 | Transcript | iTunes | Soundcloud | Raw RSS ] Dan and Brandon became best friends after a podcast interview led to the realization that they live in the same building. The two guys have a lot in common, including having played the same position for their college…

The post Dan And Brandon: How The Founders Of Zen Dude Fitness Make A Full Time Income Sharing Jump Rope Videos On YouTube appeared first on Entrepreneurs-Journey.com.

Entrepreneurs-Journey.com by Yaro Starak

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MozCon Local 2017′s Full Agenda

Posted by George-Freitag

This is it. The full agenda for MozCon Local 2017 and LocalU Advanced Workshop on February 27-28. If you’re a brand with a ton of locations or an agency with local clients, you’re going to want to come to MozCon Local 2017. We’ve got an amazing line-up of speakers from some of the top brains in Local Search to help you put together the perfect local marketing strategy and get the most out of local search.

Come visit us in Seattle and learn about local search, SEO, citations, reviews, enterprise-level strategy, and so much more. Interact directly with speakers both during Q&A sessions and mingle with other marketers at the after-party.

Buy your MozCon Local 2017 ticket!

Day One: LocalU Advanced Workshop

Time Title Presenter
8:00 – 8:30 Registration, Snacks, and Coffee
8:30 – 9:10 Keynote: 2017 Local Search Ranking Factors Survey Results Darren Shaw, Whitespark
9:10 – 9:40 Link Brainstorming Panel Mary Bowling, Mike Ramsey, Darren Shaw, Lauren Polinsky, Paula Keller French
9:40 – 10:20 Lessons Learned Over The 8 Years Running My Agency Mike Ramsey, Nifty Marketing
10:20 – 10:35 Break
10:35 – 10:55 On Page Optimization for Local Search – What You May Be Missing Mary Bowling, Ignitor Digital
10:55 – 11:25 Reviews, The Ultimate Assist Mike Blumenthal & Aaron Weiche, Get Five Stars
11:25 – 11:55 Beyond Keyword Research: Optimize Content for Relevancy with Proof Terms Paula Keller French, Search Influence
12:05 – 1:00 Birds of a Feather Lunch
1:00 – 1:30 Mobile First Tactics for Local Cindy Krum, Mobile Moxie
1:30 – 2:00 Breakout Session 1: Operational Processes of Local Search: Business Issues – Panel and Q&A Mary Bowling, Mike Ramsey, Darren Shaw, Lauren Polinsky, Paula Keller French
Breakout Session 2: Google My Business Problem Solving Willys DeVoll, Google & Mike Blumenthal, Get Five Stars
Breakout Session 3: KPIs That Really Matter for Local Businesses Ed Reese, Sixth Man Marketing
Breakout Session 4: Powerful Customer Content – Reviews, Testimonials, Case Studies Aaron Weiche, Get Five Stars
2:00 – 2:30 Breakout Session 1: Operational Processes of Local Search: Tools We Use – Panel and Q&A Mary Bowling, Mike Ramsey, Darren Shaw, Lauren Polinsky, Paula Keller French
Breakout Session 2: Google My Business Problem Solving Willys DeVoll, Google & Mike Blumenthal, Get Five Stars
Breakout Session 3: KPIs That Really Matter for Local Businesses Ed Reese, Sixth Man Marketing
Breakout Session 4: Powerful Customer Content – Reviews, Testimonials, Case Studies Aaron Weiche, Get Five Stars
2:30 – 3:00 Breakout Session 1: Operational Processes of Local Search: Ask Us Anything – Panel and Q&A Mary Bowling, Mike Ramsey, Darren Shaw, Lauren Polinsky, Paula Keller French
Breakout Session 2: Google My Business Problem Solving Willys DeVoll, Google & Mike Blumenthal, Get Five Stars
Breakout Session 3: KPIs That Really Matter for Local Businesses Ed Reese, Sixth Man Marketing
Breakout Session 4: Powerful Customer Content – Reviews, Testimonials, Case Studies Aaron Weiche, Get Five Stars
3:00 – 3:15 Break
3:15 – 4:30 Competitive Analysis and Creating a Marketing Plan Multiple Speakers
4:30 – 5:00 What We’re Watching Q&A Multiple Speakers
5:00 – 6:00 Happy Hour!

Day Two: MozCon Local Conference

Time Title Presenter
8:00 – 9:00 Breakfast and Registration
9:00 – 9:45 Future Proofing Your Local Strategy: A Panel with Google, Bing, and Yelp Willys DeVoll, Google; Christi Olson, Bing; Nate Evans, Yelp
9:45 – 10:15 Are Words the New Links? Mike Blumenthal, Get Five Stars
10:15 – 10:45 The New Local Search Ecosystems & Citation Sources That Matter in 2017 Darren Shaw, Whitespark
10:45 – 11:00 Break
11:00 – 11:15 Analytics Quick-Fire: Integrating Google Data for Local Michael Wiegand, Portent
11:15 – 11:30 Analytics Quick-Fire: Implementing and Measuring the Local SEO Funnel Anita Bhati, STAT
11:30 – 12:00 Optimizing for Location-Based Search Ashley Berman Hale, Mobile Moxie
12:00 – 1:00 Networking Lunch
1:00 – 1:30 Local Linkbuilding through PR and Outreach Rhea Drysdale, Outspoken Media
1:30 – 2:00 Crafting a Local SEO Strategy Greg Gifford, DealerOn
2:00 – 2:30 Think Locally, Act Globally: Local Strategy for Enterprise-Level Brands Heather Physioc, VML
2:30 – 2:45 Break
2:45 – 3:15 The Nitty Gritty of Getting Reviews Kate Morris, Craftsy
3:15 – 3:45 The Driving Data of Local Search George Freitag, Moz Local
3:45 – 4:15 Scaling Local with Google My Business Willys DeVoll, Google
4:15 – 4:45 MozCon Local 2017 Keynote Rand Fishkin, Moz
6:00 – 10:00 Mozcon Local Afterparty!

Buy your MozCon Local 2017 ticket!

Speakers


Aaron Weiche

Aaron Weiche
Get Five Stars
@AaronWeiche
Session: Powerful Customer Content – Reviews, Testimonials, Case Studies

Aaron Weiche is the CMO for GetFiveStars.com, a customer feedback and online review platform. Aaron is a digital marketing veteran of over 18 years growing agencies small and large in executive and partner roles. Aaron has built and optimized hundreds of websites for companies and organizations of all sizes. He helped found the MnSearch Association, is a faculty partner at Local University, Google Analytics Certified, and speaks nationally on search marketing, social media, reviews, web design and mobile. Aaron also blogs on local digital marketing at AaronWeiche.com.


Anita Bhatti

Anita Bhatti
STAT
@anitabhatti
Session: Implementing and Measuring the Local SEO Funnel

Anita is the Director of Marketing at STAT where she leads a team of super talented folks obsessed with bringing valuable SERP insights to SEO experts. Prior to STAT, she took on the marketing challenges of a local yoga startup and a global SaaS company.


Ashley Berman Hale

Ashley Berman Hale
Mobile Moxie
@bermanhale
Session: Optimizing for Location Based Search

Ashley has been doing technical SEO for over 12 years and has a knack for figuring out what holds sites (large & small) back. She’s a longtime Google Webmaster Top Contributor and started one of the most successful SEO meetups in the country.


Britney Muller

Britney Muller
Moz
@BritneyMuller
Emcee, MozCon Local

Originally from MN, Britney resides in Denver, CO where she does SEO & Content Architecture for Moz. Britney has been doing digital marketing for over 10 years and founded Pryde Marketing, a strategic Medical Marketing Agency, in 2013.


Christi Olson

Christi Olson
Bing
@ChristiJOlson
Session: Future Proofing Your Local Strategy: A Panel with Google, Bing, and Yelp

Christi is a Search Evangelist at Microsoft in Seattle, Washington. Prior to joining the team at Bing Ads at Microsoft, Christi has worked at Point It, Expedia, Harry & David, Pointmarc, Microsoft (MSN, Bing, Windows), and the Altria Corporation. For over a decade Christi has been a student and practitioner of SEM; living and breathing through the evolution of search updates (both organic and paid) that have kept us constantly adjusting our digital strategies. Christi is passionate about digital and has spent her career helping businesses solve their marketing challenges and goals through studying and analyzing data to develop actionable insights and strategies.


Cindy Krum

Cindy Krum
Mobile Moxie
@Suzzicks
Session: Mobile First Tactics for Local

Cindy Krum is the CEO and Founder of MobileMoxie, and author of Mobile Marketing: Finding Your Customers No Matter Where They Are, which gets 4.5 out of 5 stars on Amazon. She is the leading Mobile SEO consultant, and is thought leader in the search industry. Cindy works with many top-notch, internationally recognized clients, assisting with mobile SEO, Responsive Design, mobile site migrations and site-speed optimization.


Darren Shaw

Darren Shaw
Whitespark
@DarrenShaw_
Sessions: 2017 Local Search Ranking Factors Survey Results, The New Local Search Ecosystems & Citation Sources That Matter in 2017

Darren Shaw is the president and founder of Whitespark, a company that builds software and provides services to help businesses with local search. He’s widely regarded in the local SEO community as an innovator, one whose years of experience working with massive local data sets have given him uncommon insights into the inner workings of the world of citation-building and local search marketing. Darren has been working on the web for over 16 years and loves everything about local SEO.


Ed Reese

Ed Reese
Sixth Man Marketing
@ed_reese
Sessions: KPIs That Really Matter for Local Businesses

Ed has been helping companies improve their online marketing efforts through his agency, Sixth Man Marketing since 2008. In January of 2016 Sixth Man was acquired by J.E.B. Commerce and is operating as their analytics and optimization division. He’s a Faculty Member at LocalU and an Adjunct Professor of Digital Marketing at Gonzaga University. He’s also an aspiring disc golfer with one tournament win under his belt and and active family (with two young sons) that keep him busy.


George Freitag

George Freitag
Moz
@georgefreitag
Session: The Driving Data of Local Search

George is the Local Search Evangelist and SEO Strategist for Moz Local where he helps brands, practitioners, and business owners alike get the most out of local search. Prior to Moz, George was the head of SEO at Portent, a digital marketing agency in Seattle.


Greg Gifford

Greg Gifford
DealerOn
@GregGifford
Session: TBD

Greg Gifford is the Director of Search and Social at DealerOn, a software company that provides websites and online marketing to new car dealers all over the country. Check out their awesome blog for more of Greg’s local search posts and videos.


Heather Physioc

Heather Physioc
VML
@HeatherPhysioc
Session: Think Locally, Act Globally

Heather Physioc is Director of Organic Search at global digital ad agency VML, which performs search engine optimization services for multinational brands like Wendy’s, Bridgestone, Ford and Hill’s Pet Nutrition.


Kate Morris

Kate Morris
Craftsy
@katemorris
Session: The Nitty Gritty of Getting Reviews

Kate Morris is the Director of SEO at Craftsy and an Associate for Moz. She has been in search for 14 years with a soft spot for branding and user experience.


Lauren Polinsky

Lauren Polinsky
@laurenpolinsky
Session: Link Brainstorming Panel

Lauren is an experienced marketer who pursues holistic, innovative changes for digital brands by providing content strategy recommendations rooted in SEO best practices. She’s focused on SEO optimization strategies with have a background in both print and digital marketing.


Mary Bowling

Mary Bowling
Ignitor Digital
@MaryBowling
Session: On-Page Optimization for Local Search – What You May Be Missing

Mary has been involved in all aspects of SEO since 2003 and has always been intrigued by Local Search. With a background as a serial entrepreneur, she always tries to approach Local Search and internet marketing in a practical way and from a small business owner’s perspective. Mary is an SEO practitioner and consultant, speaks frequently on Local Search at industry conferences and trains other individuals and groups in successful Local Search strategy and tactics.


Michael Wiegand

Michael Wiegand
Portent
@mwiegand
Session: Integrating Google Data for Local

Michael Wiegand is an experienced digital marketer of 14 years who specializes in analytics and conversion rate optimization for Portent – a Seattle-based Internet marketing agency. After attending Cal Baptist University, Michael began his career in direct marketing in 2002, in the healthcare and real estate verticals. In 2007, he joined Portent’s growing team of marketers and subsequently founded the company’s analytics division.


Mike Blumenthal

Mike Blumenthal
Get Five Stars
@mblumenthal
Sessions: Reviews, The Ultimate Assist, Google My Business Problem Solving, Are Words the New Links?

Mike grew up sweeping floors in his family retail business at age 7 and saw the challenges of local marketing up close from an early age. Before co-founding GetFiveStars.com and LocalU.org he had been doing what we now know as Local SEO since 2005 and writing at his blog Understanding Google Local since 2006. He loves researching and understanding the issues that confront bricks and mortar storefronts and helping owners, agencies and franchises tackle the challenges of the ever changing local marketing world.


Mike Ramsey

Mike Ramsey
Nifty Marketing
@MikeRamsey
Session: Lessons Learned Over The 8 Years Running My Agency

Mike Ramsey is the President of Nifty Marketing and NiftyLaw. He is the author of Winning At Local Search, an international speaker, and a partner at LocalU. Mike founded the Nifty Ventures in 2009 which has been recognized by Inc. as one of the fastest growing companies in America.


Nate Evans

Nate Evans
Yelp
@nateevans84
Session: Future Proofing Your Local Strategy: A Panel with Google, Bing, and Yelp

Nate Evans, Sr. Manager of Business Development, focuses on growing Yelp‘s advertising partners program. Nate joined Yelp in 2008 and previously held prior leadership roles in local and enterprise sales. Prior to Yelp, he worked at Allison & Partners public relations, where he worked in the tech division with clients such as YouTube, Zinio & Parallels. Nate holds a B.A. in Mass Communications from the University of California, Berkeley.


Paula Keller French

Paula Keller French
Search Influence
@paulakfrench
Session: Beyond Keyword Research: Optimize Content for Relevancy with Proof Terms

Paula Keller French has worked to establish strategic digital marketing solutions for clients since 2009, when she joined Search Influence on the then 9-person team. Paula contributed to the company’s rapid growth by building and training a team of 30+ effective account strategists. Today, Paula plays online marketing matchmaker by identifying the right marketing solutions to match business goals to help companies in almost any industry optimize their potential, with a heavy hand in medical, legal, tourism, and home services.


Rand Fishkin

Rand Fishkin
Moz
@randfish
Session: MozCon Local 2017 Keynote

Rand Fishkin uses the ludicrous title, Wizard of Moz. He’s founder and former CEO of Moz, co-author of a pair of books on SEO, and co-founder of Inbound.org.


Rhea Drysdale

Rhea Drysdale
Outspoken Media
@Rhea
Session: Local Linkbuilding through PR and Outreach

Rhea Drysdale is Chief Executive Officer of Outspoken Media where she oversees the strategic vision and growth of the company, its clients, and team.


Willys DeVoll

Willys DeVoll

Google
@willysdevoll
Sessions: Google My Business Problem Solving, Future Proofing Your Local Strategy: A Panel with Google, Bing, and Yelp, Scaling Local with Google My Business

Willys Devoll is a content strategist for Google My Business and a member of the AdWords Content Strategy and Development team. He has also worked as a technical writer and content developer on Google for Work. In the past, DeVoll worked for Major League Baseball Advanced Media in communications, and at the Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis, where he contributed to research in the Literary Lab.

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Leslie Samuel: Biology Professor Transforms Teaching Passion Into Full Time Blogging Business

[ Download MP3 | Transcript | iTunes | Soundcloud | Raw RSS ] Leslie Samuel first came to my attention as a standout student of my Blog Mastermind 1.0 program way back in 2008. He also enrolled in my Become A Blogger video course, co-created with my friend Gideon Shalwick….

The post Leslie Samuel: Biology Professor Transforms Teaching Passion Into Full Time Blogging Business appeared first on Entrepreneurs-Journey.com.

Entrepreneurs-Journey.com by Yaro Starak

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