Tag Archive | "from"

7 Lessons Copywriters Can Learn from Simply Listening to a Really Good Conversation

The easy part of this process is following the seven lessons below. It’s much harder to find a good conversation. The sad truth is, most of us are terrible at holding even a half-decent conversation. We’re in too much of a hurry. We’re too anxious to get our own points of view across, and we
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What Do Dolphins Eat? Lessons from How Kids Search

Posted by willcritchlow

Kids may search differently than adults, but there are some interesting insights from how they use Google that can help deepen our understanding of searchers in general. Comfort levels with particular search strategies, reading only the bold words, taking search suggestions and related searches as answers — there’s a lot to dig into. In this week’s slightly different-from-the-norm Whiteboard Friday, we welcome the fantastic Will Critchlow to share lessons from how kids search.

Click on the whiteboard image above to open a high-resolution version in a new tab!

Video Transcription

Hi, everyone. I’m Will Critchlow, founder and CEO of Distilled, and this week’s Whiteboard Friday is a little bit different. I want to talk about some surprising and interesting and a few funny facts that I learnt when I was reading some research that Google did about how kids search for information. So this isn’t super actionable. This is not about tactics of improving your website particularly. But I think we get some insights — they were studying kids aged 7 to 11 — by looking at how kids interact. We can see some reflections or some ideas about how there might be some misconceptions out there about how adults search as well. So let’s dive into it.

What do dolphins eat?

I’ve got this “What do dolphins eat?” because this was the first question that the researchers gave to the kids to say sit down in front of a search box, go. They tell this little anecdote, a little bit kind of soul-destroying, of this I think it was a seven-year-old child who starts typing dolphin, D-O-L-F, and then presses Enter, and it was like sadly there’s no dolphins, which hopefully they found him some dolphins. But a lot of the kids succeeded at this task.

Different kinds of searchers

The researchers divided the ways that the kids approached it up into a bunch of different categories. They found that some kids were power searchers. Some are what they called “developing.” They classified some as “distracted.” But one that I found fascinating was what they called visual searchers. I think they found this more commonly among the younger kids who were perhaps a little bit less confident reading and writing. It turns out that, for almost any question you asked them, these kids would turn first to image search.

So for this particular question, they would go to image search, typically just type “dolphin” and then scroll and go looking for pictures of a dolphin eating something. Then they’d find a dolphin eating a fish, and they’d turn to the researcher and say “Look, dolphins eat fish.” Which, when you think about it, I quite like in an era of fake news. This is the kids doing primary research. They’re going direct to the primary source. But it’s not something that I would have ever really considered, and I don’t know if you would. But hopefully this kind of sparks some thought and some insights and discussions at your end. They found that there were some kids who pretty much always, no matter what you asked them, would always go and look for pictures.

Kids who were a bit more developed, a bit more confident in their reading and writing would often fall into one of these camps where they were hopefully focusing on the attention. They found a lot of kids were obviously distracted, and I think as adults this is something that we can relate to. Many of the kids were not really very interested in the task at hand. But this kind of path from distracted to developing to power searcher is an interesting journey that I think totally applies to grown-ups as well.

In practice: [wat do dolfin eat]

So I actually, after I read this paper, went and did some research on my kids. So my kids were in roughly this age range. When I was doing it, my daughter was eight and my son was five and a half. Both of them interestingly typed “wat do dolfin eat” pretty much like this. They both misspelled “what,” and they both misspelled “dolphin.” Google was fine with that. Obviously, these days this is plenty close enough to get the result you wanted. Both of them successfully answered the question pretty much, but both of them went straight to the OneBox. This is, again, probably unsurprising. You can guess this is probably how most people search.

“Oh, what’s a cephalopod?” The path from distracted to developing

So there’s a OneBox that comes up, and it’s got a picture of a dolphin. So my daughter, a very confident reader, she loves reading, “wat do dolfin eat,” she sat and she read the OneBox, and then she turned to me and she said, “It says they eat fish and herring. Oh, what’s a cephalopod?” I think this was her going from distracted into developing probably. To start off with, she was just answering this question because I had asked her to. But then she saw a word that she didn’t know, and suddenly she was curious. She had to kind of carefully type it because it’s a slightly tricky word to spell. But she was off looking up what is a cephalopod, and you could see the engagement shift from “I’m typing this because Dad has asked me to and it’s a bit interesting I guess” to “huh, I don’t know what a cephalopod is, and now I’m doing my own research for my own reasons.” So that was interesting.

“Dolphins eat fish, herring, killer whales”: Reading the bold words

My son, as I said, typed something pretty similar, and he, at the point when he was doing this, was at the stage of certainly capable of reading, but generally would read out loud and a little bit halting. What was fascinating on this was he only read the bold words. He read it out loud, and he didn’t read the OneBox. He just read the bold words. So he said to me, “Dolphins eat fish, herring, killer whales,” because killer whales, for some reason, was bolded. I guess it was pivoting from talking about what dolphins eat to what killer whales eat, and he didn’t read the context. This cracked him up. So he thought that was ridiculous, and isn’t it funny that Google thinks that dolphins eat killer whales.

That is similar to some stuff that was in the original research, where there were a bunch of common misconceptions it turns out that kids have and I bet a bunch of adults have. Most adults probably don’t think that the bold words in the OneBox are the list of the answer, but it does point to the problems with factual-based, truthy type queries where Google is being asked to be the arbiter of truth on some of this stuff. We won’t get too deep into that.

Common misconceptions for kids when searching

1. Search suggestions are answers

But some common misconceptions they found some kids thought that the search suggestions, so the drop-down as you start typing, were the answers, which is bit problematic. I mean we’ve all seen kind of racist or hateful drop-downs in those search queries. But in this particular case, it was mainly just funny. It would end up with things like you start asking “what do dolphins eat,” and it would be like “Do dolphins eat cats” was one of the search suggestions.

2. Related searches are answers

Similar with related searches, which, as we know, are not answers to the question. These are other questions. But kids in particular — I mean, I think this is true of all users — didn’t necessarily read the directions on the page, didn’t read that they were related searches, just saw these things that said “dolphin” a lot and started reading out those. So that was interesting.

How kids search complicated questions

The next bit of the research was much more complex. So they started with these easy questions, and they got into much harder kind of questions. One of them that they asked was this one, which is really quite hard. So the question was, “Can you find what day of the week the vice president’s birthday will fall on next year?” This is a multifaceted, multipart question.

How do they handle complex, multi-step queries?

Most of the younger kids were pretty stumped on this question. Some did manage it. I think a lot of adults would fail at this. So if you just turn to Google, if you just typed this in or do a voice search, this is the kind of thing that Google is almost on the verge of being able to do. If you said something like, “When is the vice president’s birthday,” that’s a question that Google might just be able to answer. But this kind of three-layered thing, what day of the week and next year, make this actually a very hard query. So the kids had to first figure out that, to answer this, this wasn’t a single query. They had to do multiple stages of research. When is the vice president’s birthday? What day of the week is that date next year? Work through it like that.

I found with my kids, my eight-year-old daughter got stuck halfway through. She kind of realized that she wasn’t going to get there in one step, but also couldn’t quite structure the multi-levels needed to get to, but also started getting a bit distracted again. It was no longer about cephalopods, so she wasn’t quite as interested.

Search volume will grow in new areas as Google’s capabilities develop

This I think is a whole area that, as Google’s capabilities develop to answer more complex queries and as we start to trust and learn that those kind of queries can be answered, what we see is that there is going to be increasing, growing search volume in new areas. So I’m going to link to a post I wrote about a presentation I gave about the next trillion searches. This is my hypothesis that essentially, very broad brush strokes, there are a trillion desktop searches a year. There are a trillion mobile searches a year. There’s another trillion out there in searches that we don’t do yet because they can’t be answered well. I’ve got some data to back that up and some arguments why I think it’s about that size. But I think this is kind of closely related to this kind of thing, where you see kids get stuck on these kind of queries.

Incidentally, I’d encourage you to go and try this. It’s quite interesting, because as you work through trying to get the answer, you’ll find search results that appear to give the answer. So, for example, I think there was an About.com page that actually purported to give the answer. It said, “What day of the week is the vice president’s birthday on?” But it had been written a year before, and there was no date on the page. So actually it was wrong. It said Thursday. That was the answer in 2016 or 2017. So that just, again, points to the difference between primary research, the difference between answering a question and truth. I think there’s a lot of kind of philosophical questions baked away in there.

Kids get comfortable with how they search – even if it’s wrong

So we’re going to wrap up with possibly my favorite anecdote of the user research that these guys did, which was that they said some of these kids, somewhere in this developing stage, get very attached to searching in one particular way. I guess this is kind of related to the visual search thing. They find something that works for them. It works once. They get comfortable with it, they’re familiar with it, and they just do that for everything, whether it’s appropriate or not. My favorite example was this one child who apparently looked for information about both dolphins and the vice president of the United States on the SpongeBob SquarePants website, which I mean maybe it works for dolphins, but I’m guessing there isn’t an awful lot of VP information.

So anyway, I hope you’ve enjoyed this little adventure into how kids search and maybe some things that we can learn from it. Drop some anecdotes of your own in the comments. I’d love to hear your experiences and some of the funny things that you’ve learnt along the way. Take care.

Video transcription by Speechpad.com

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5 Ways to Stop Ad Fatigue From Killing Your Facebook Campaign

The Internet and social media have made it easy for brands to get their message out to millions of people. In fact, the average American is reportedly exposed to 4,000 to 10,000 advertisements every single day. But this accessibility has also led to “Banner Blindness,” a psychological effect wherein people become blind or indifferent to the ads they see.

Banner blindness is essentially the consumer’s defense mechanism in the face of an abundance of information. This means that at some point, your ads will no longer be effective as your audience starts to suffer from ad fatigue.

Understanding Ad Fatigue

Ad fatigue occurs when your target market becomes so used to your advertisements that they become bored and stop paying attention to them.

One platform where ad fatigue can be felt is Facebook, where account holders frequently see advertisements fighting for space amidst the numerous statuses and photos on their News Feeds. Marketers understand the impact ad fatigue can have on a company’s investment. When the Frequency rate of a Facebook ad goes up, its click-through-rate (CTR) tends to go down. Conversely, the cost-per-click for the company will increase.

Luckily, the platform’s robust rotation display and audience-targeting network mean there are strategies that can be utilized to prevent ad fatigue from setting in.

5 Ways to Prevent Facebook Ad Fatigue

1. Change Your Headline and Use Power Words

Image result for free

Mix up the wording in your ad. Consider changing your headline to include a question, your brand name or even a call-to-action (CTA). Another option would be to change the language to target a specific audience. For instance, men would prefer a more humorous content while women opt for something subtle. Power words like “Instantly,” “Sensational,” “Free” and “Now” can boost the odds of having a more positive response to your ads.

2. Tweak Ad Displays

Tweak the design of your ads to capture your audience’s interest once more. Something as simple as changing the background color can make a huge difference so try experimenting with different hues. You can also utilize a simpler image to catch people’s eyes. A photo of a happy woman apparently works best in Facebook ads. Avoid images with lots of details and keep the use of text in the picture to a minimum.

3. Rotate Demographics and Audience Network

When you keep utilizing the same group on the platform’s Audience Network, desktop, and mobile iterations, the ad frequency will increase, thereby raising the dangers of ad fatigue. Separate your ad groups for every placement. This will make tracking bidding and frequency rates more effective. You should also consider rotating your ads and the target audience every few days to reduce individual ad frequency and keep things fresh.

4. Try Out Different Call-to-ActionsRelated image

Your ad requires a strong call-to-action if you want to nab those conversions. Test five to six distinct CTAs as you rotate your ads and see which one gives the best result. For instance, you can start with a straight CTA this week (ex. Take that vacation now!). You can then try one that begins with a question (Need a break from work?) the following week.

5. Stop Underperforming Campaigns

If all else fails, you have the option to stop underperforming campaigns until you can develop something better. Evaluate every aspect of your marketing campaign, from the images you used to the target groups to the value proposition, to see what is causing the sluggish conversion rates. You can also freeze your ads once the frequency becomes too high and wait until people don’t recognize them anymore.

Fighting ad fatigue on Facebook is crucial to the success of your campaign. Utilize a variety of strategies like changing background colors or rotating the audience network to keep things interesting. Bear in mind that these ads are pay-per-click, so you have more than enough leeway to try something different.

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How To Transition From Full Time Employment To Full Time Entrepreneurship

 [ Download MP3 | Transcript | iTunes | Soundcloud | Raw RSS ] Over the years I’ve heard hundreds of stories from people who made the big leap, leaving the world of employment to become full-time entrepreneurs. The stories range from the incredibly daring people who quit their jobs without having any savings, or […]

The post How To Transition From Full Time Employment To Full Time Entrepreneurship appeared first on Yaro.Blog.

Entrepreneurs-Journey.com by Yaro Starak

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The Content Path: Moving from Attention to Action

We work so hard to get attention. We craft our headlines to make them irresistible. We strive to display enticing images that make a great first impression. If we’re Copyblogger readers, we think about finding that perfect balance of meaning and fascination that will pull our audience right into our content. But what do we
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States Can Now Collect Sales Tax From eCommerce Businesses, Supreme Court Gives Go-Ahead

Online shoppers will soon be shelling out more money for their purchases now that the US Supreme Court ruled that states can demand e-businesses collect sales taxes.

The case, which will have a profound effect on the consumer economy, saw the country’s Supreme Court justices voting 5 to 4 that states have the right to impose taxes on online sales even if the retailer does not have a warehouse or a physical store in their jurisdiction.

Brick-and-mortar shops have been blaming online stores and the apparent tax break they enjoy for slow sales. Meanwhile, eCommerce businesses have claimed that their success was because of the convenience they offer, not the sales tax (or lack thereof).

Doing Away with Years Worth of Laws

The surprising ruling ended years of legislative battles as it overturned a 1992 decision. It also answered the question of whether the law had fallen behind the digital economy. According to the Supreme Court ruling, the requirement that sales taxes are bound to retailers with a “physical presence” in a state was “unsound” and outdated.

South Dakota is a clear winner in this ruling. The state had petitioned the court to uphold recently passed legislation imposing a sales tax on online retailers. Marty Jackley, the state’s attorney general, defended the law by claiming that South Dakota was “losing millions for education, healthcare and infrastructure” and that the unfair playing field was hurting its citizens.

The ongoing issue that eCommerce businesses had an unfair advantage over brick-and-mortar shops was pushed to the forefront again when President Donald Trump tweeted in April that online retail giant Amazon was paying “little or no taxes to state & local governments.” It should be pointed out, though, that Amazon has been collecting sales taxes from customers in 45 states since April 2017.

Impact of Supreme Court Ruling on eCommerce

The decision to levy sales tax on online retailers had traditional retailers celebrating while the stocks of ecommerce companies took a dive.

Wayfair, an online furnishings retailer, saw its shares drop 3.8 percent while Overstock.com and eBay fell 2.5 percent and 2 percent respectively.

Amazon’s shares also took a hit, going down 1 percent. However, the retail giant’s situation is more complicated. While the company enjoyed the tax exemption for several years, a policy change in 2012 has seen it collecting tax on its own sales in the District of Columbia and 45 other states. But its third-party sellers haven’t been required to do so and thus will feel the impact of the court’s decision.

President Trump has declared the Supreme Court ruling as a “big victory for fairness” in the US and a “great victory for consumers and retailers.” However, consumers would be paying more once this ruling is implemented.

There’s no telling yet how the new ruling will affect the retail landscape as this will largely depend on how states choose to exercise their authority regarding online sales. Some experts have noted that the emphasis placed by the justices on South Dakota’s law provides small online businesses with some protection as only sellers that engage in transactions of 200 or more or those that deliver goods worth more than $ 100,000 will be taxed.

However, the numbers could vary as $ 100,000 can be considered quite low from a company income tax perspective. But it’s safe to say that states will try to implement these tax sales, whether via existing or new legislation.

[Featured image via Pexels.com]

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Moz’s Mid-Year Retrospective: Exciting Upgrades from the First Half of 2018

Posted by NeilCrist

Every year, we publish an overview of all the upgrades we’ve made to our tools and how those changes benefit our customers and Moz Community members. So far, 2018 has been a whirlwind of activity here at Moz — not only did we release a massive, long-awaited update to our link building tool, we’ve also been improving and updating systems and tools across the board to make your Moz experience even better. To that end, we’re sharing a mid-year retrospective to keep up with the incredible amount of progress we’ve made.

We receive a lot of amazing feedback from our customers on pain points they experience and improvements they’d like to see. Folks, we hear you.

We not only massively restructured some of our internal systems to provide you with better data, we also innovated new ways to display and report on that data, making the tools more accurate and more useful than ever before.

If you’ve been tasked with achieving organic success, we know your job isn’t easy. You need tools that get the job done, and done well. We think Moz delivered.

Check out our 2018 improvements so far:

Our new link index: Bigger, fresher, better than ever

Our link index underwent a major overhaul: it’s now 20x larger and 30x fresher than it was previously. This new link index data has been made available via our Mozscape API, as well as integrated into many Moz Pro tools, including Campaigns, Keyword Explorer, the MozBar, and Fresh Web Explorer. But undoubtedly the largest and most-anticipated improvement the new link index allowed us to make was the launch of Link Explorer, which we rolled out at the end of April as a replacement for Open Site Explorer.

Link Explorer addresses and improves upon its predecessor by providing more data, fresher data, and better ways to visualize that data. Answering a long-asked-for feature in OSE, Link Explorer includes historical metrics, and it also surfaces newly discovered and lost links:

Below are just a few of the many ways Link Explorer is providing some of the best link data available:

  • Link Explorer’s link index contains approximately 4.8 trillion URLs — that’s 20x larger than OSE and surpasses Ahrefs’ index (~3 trillion pages) and Majestic’s fresh index (~1 trillion pages).
  • Link Explorer is 30x fresher than OSE. All data updates every 24 hours.
  • We believe Link Explorer is unique in how accurately our link index represents the web, resulting in data quality you can trust.
  • Link Explorer has the closest robots.txt profile to Google among the three major link indexes, which means we get more of the links Google gets.
  • We also improved Domain Authority, Page Authority, and Spam Score. The size and freshness of our index has allowed us to offer a more stable DA and PA score. Though it will still fluctuate as the index fluctuates (which has always been by design), it will not be as dramatic as it was in Open Site Explorer.

Explore your link profile

You can learn more about Link Explorer by reading Sarah Bird’s announcement, watching Rand’s Whiteboard Friday, or visiting our Link Explorer Help Guide. Even though it’s still in beta, Link Explorer already blows away OSE’s data quality, freshness, and capabilities. Look for steady improvements to Link Explorer as we continue to iterate on it and add more key features.

New-and-improved On-Page Grader

Moz’s On-Page Grader got a thorough and much-needed overhaul! Not only did we freshen up the interface with a new look and feel, but we also added new features and improved upon our data.

Inside the new On-Page Grader, you’ll find:

  • An updated metrics bar to show you Page Title, Meta Description, and the number of Keywords Found. No need to dig through source code!
  • An updated Optimization Score to align with the Page Optimization feature that’s inside Campaigns and in the MozBar. Instead of a letter grade (A–F), you now have Page Score (0–100) for a more precise measurement of page optimization performance.
  • On-page factors are now categorized so you can see what is hurting or helping your Page Score.
  • On-page factors are organized by importance so you can prioritize your efforts. Red indicates high importance, yellow indicates moderate importance, and blue indicates low importance.

On-Page Grader is a great way to take a quick look at how well a page is optimized for a specified keyword. Here’s how it works.

Input your page and the keyword you want that page to rank for…

… and On-Page Grader will return a list of suggestions for improving your on-site optimization.

Check it out!

Keyword ranking data now available for Canada, UK, and Australia

We’re very excited to announce that, as of just last week, international data has been added to the Keywords by Site feature of Keyword Explorer! This will now allow Moz Pro customers to see which keywords they rank for and assess their visibility across millions of SERPs, now encompassing the US, Canada, the United Kingdom, and Australia! Keywords by Site is a newer feature within Keyword Explorer, added just last October to show which and how many keywords any domain, subdomain, or page ranks for.

Want to see which keywords your site ranks for in the US, UK, Canada, or Australia?

See what you rank for

It’s easy to use — just select a country from the dropdown menu to the right. This will show you which keywords a domain or page is ranking for from a particular country.

On-Demand Crawl now available

We know it can be important to track your site changes in real time. That’s why, on June 29th, we’re replacing our legacy site audit tool, Crawl Test, with the new and improved On-Demand Crawl:

Whether you need to double-check a change you’ve made or need a one-off report, the new On-Demand Crawl offers an updated experience for Moz Pro customers:

  • Crawl reports are now faster and available sooner, allowing you to quickly assess your site, a new client or prospect’s, or the competition.
  • Your site issues are now categorized by issue type and quantity, making it easier to identify what to work on and how to prioritize:

  • Recommendations are now provided for how to fix each issue, along with resources detailing why it matters:

  • Site audit reports are now easier than ever to package and present with PDF exports.
  • An updated, fresh design and UX!

On-Demand Crawl is already available now in Moz Pro. If you’re curious how it works, check it out:

Try On-Demand Crawl

Improvements to tool notifications & visuals

Moz’s email notification system and tools dashboard didn’t always sync up perfectly with the actual data update times. Sometimes, customers would receive an email or see updated dates on their dashboard before the data had rolled out, resulting in confusion. We’ve streamlined the process, and now customers no longer have to wonder where their data is — you can rest assured that your data is waiting for you in Moz Pro as soon as you’re notified.

Rank Tracker is sticking around

While we had originally planned to retire Rank Tracker at the beginning of June, we’ve decided to hold off in light of the feedback we received from our customers. Our goal in retiring Rank Tracker was to make Moz Pro easier to navigate by eliminating the redundancy of having two options for tracking keyword rankings (Rank Tracker and Campaigns), but after hearing how many people use and value Rank Tracker, and after weighing our options, we decided to postpone its retirement until we had a better solution than simply shutting it down.

Right now, we’re focused on learning more from our community on what makes this tool so valuable, so if you have feedback regarding Rank Tracker, we’d love it if you would take our survey. The information we gather from this survey will help us create a better solution for you!

Updates from Moz Academy

New advanced SEO courses

In response to the growing interest in advanced and niche-specific training, Moz is now offering ongoing classes and seminars on topics such as e-commerce SEO and technical site audits. If there’s an advanced topic you’d like training on, let us know by visiting https://moz.com/training and navigating to the “Custom” tab to tell us exactly what type of training you’re looking for.

On-demand coursework

We love the fact that we have Moz customers from around the globe, so we’re always looking for new ways to accommodate those in different timezones and those with sporadic schedules. One new way we’re doing this is by offering on-demand coursework. Get training from Moz when it works best for you. With this added scheduling flexibility (and with added instructors to boot), we hope to be able to reach more people than ever before.

To view Moz’s on-demand coursework, visit moz.com/training and click on the “On-Demand” tab.

Certificate development

There’s been a growing demand for a meaningful certification program in SEO, and we’re proud to say that Moz is here to deliver. This coursework will include a certificate and a badge for your LinkedIn profile. We’re planning on launching the program later this year, so stay tuned by signing up for Moz Training Alerts!

Tell us what you think!

Have feedback for us on any of our 2018 improvements? Any ideas on new ways we can improve our tools and training resources? Let us know in the comments! We love hearing from marketers like you. Your input helps us develop the best tools possible for ensuring your content gets found online.

If you’re not a Moz Pro subscriber and haven’t gotten a chance to check out these new features yet, sign up for a free trial!

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!


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How To Transition From Full Time Employment To Full Time Entrepreneurship

 [ Download MP3 | Transcript | iTunes | Soundcloud | Raw RSS ] Over the years I’ve heard hundreds of stories from people who made the big leap, leaving the world of employment to become full-time entrepreneurs. The stories range from the incredibly daring people who quit their jobs…

The post How To Transition From Full Time Employment To Full Time Entrepreneurship appeared first on Yaro.blog.

Entrepreneurs-Journey.com by Yaro Starak

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Email Testing: 7 tips from your peers for email conversion optimization

We recently asked the MarketingSherpa audience for tips on running effective email tests. Here are a few of the most helpful responses to consider as you start to develop an email testing program.
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Customer-First Marketing: What every entrepreneur and SMB marketer can learn from successful Etsy sellers

Etsy is a laboratory of capitalism that any marketers — especially small businesses, entrepreneurs, and startups — can learn from. Here are just a few tips from successful shop owners that can help other marketers who are trying to succeed in an already saturated marketplace.
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