Tag Archive | "first"

Tien Chiu: How This Ex-Google Employee Gave It All Up To Build An Online Business Teaching The Craft Of Color Weaving (And The Story Behind Her First $25,000 Product Launch)

[ Download MP3 | Transcript Coming Soon | iTunes | Soundcloud | Stitcher | Spotify | Raw RSS ] I’m so excited to publish this interview because it shares a success story of one of the most recent people to go through Blog Mastermind 2.0 (this is a 2019 case study!). Tien Chiu has a background as […]

The post Tien Chiu: How This Ex-Google Employee Gave It All Up To Build An Online Business Teaching The Craft Of Color Weaving (And The Story Behind Her First $ 25,000 Product Launch) appeared first on Yaro.Blog.

Entrepreneurs-Journey.com by Yaro Starak

Posted in IM NewsComments Off

There’s No Doubt It’s a Cloud First World, Says Rackspace SVP

“If you think about where we are on the technology adoption curve and the trillion dollars of spend that are ultimately going to move, there’s no doubt that it’s a cloud-first world,” says Prashanth Chandasekar, Senior Vice President & General Manager at Rackspace. “But the vast majority of the workloads exist in traditional IT. How do we take on that hybrid movement? Amazon is very aggressively investing and we’re investing with them and helping our customers along their journey effectively.”

Prashanth Chandasekar, SVP & GM at Rackspace, discusses how Rackspace has transformed from primarily a hosting company to a technology service company helping enterprises effectively and efficiently move to the cloud on AWS and other platforms in an interview on theCUBE at AWS Summit London 2019:

Rackspace Helping Companies Navigate to the AWS Cloud

Ultimately part of the reason why customers in our install base were reaching out to us and saying, ”Hey Rackspace, you’ve done a phenomenal job helping us in the first evolution of our journey, can you help us now in this new world where it’s actually quite complicated?” Over 1,400 features on average are being launched by Amazon on a yearly basis. Despite what we hear in the headlines where cloud first companies and the startups of today are absolutely leveraging Lambda out of the gate or containers out of the gate.

There are a whole host of companies that are going through this massive digital disruption trying to compete with these startups. They need a lot of help to reskill their workforce to change the way they think about processes within their organizations between their business development and technology and operations teams. Then ultimately, how do they actually build out a much more agile way of responding to customers? That work requires a company like Rackspace to come and help them navigate through that really large set of features.

There’s No Doubt It’s a Cloud First World

That’s what’s so dynamic about the space. Nobody would have predicted this ten years ago. Even today we’re seeing a ton of momentum with concepts that were very nascent just a few years ago. Kubernetes is a concept where almost every one of our AWS customers at Rackspace, what we call fanatical AWS, are absolutely looking for help on Kubernetes. When we think about Docker a few years ago and Dock Enterprise and we think about Kubernetes and there was that battle, today the battle has been won. Kubernetes is pretty much the de-facto orchestration engine. Nobody would have predicted that a couple of years ago.

Hybrid and multi-cloud are becoming a lot more prevalent. I think even Amazon is very much acknowledging that the big opportunity is in hybrid cloud. If you think about where we are on the technology adoption curve and the trillion dollars of spend that are ultimately going to move, there’s no doubt that it’s a cloud-first world or a destination is the cloud. But the vast majority of the workloads exist in traditional IT. How do we take on that hybrid movement? Outposts is a great acknowledgment of that. Amazon is very aggressively investing and we’re investing with them and helping our customers along their journey effectively.

There’s No Doubt It’s a Cloud First World, Says Rackspace SVP Prashanth Chandasekar

The post There’s No Doubt It’s a Cloud First World, Says Rackspace SVP appeared first on WebProNews.

WebProNews

Posted in IM NewsComments Off

There’s No Doubt It’s a Cloud First World, Says Rackspace SVP

“If you think about where we are on the technology adoption curve and the trillion dollars of spend that are ultimately going to move, there’s no doubt that it’s a cloud-first world,” says Prashanth Chandasekar, Senior Vice President & General Manager at Rackspace. “But the vast majority of the workloads exist in traditional IT. How do we take on that hybrid movement? Amazon is very aggressively investing and we’re investing with them and helping our customers along their journey effectively.”

Prashanth Chandasekar, SVP & GM at Rackspace, discusses how Rackspace has transformed from primarily a hosting company to a technology service company helping enterprises effectively and efficiently move to the cloud on AWS and other platforms in an interview on theCUBE at AWS Summit London 2019:

Rackspace Helping Companies Navigate to the AWS Cloud

Ultimately part of the reason why customers in our install base were reaching out to us and saying, ”Hey Rackspace, you’ve done a phenomenal job helping us in the first evolution of our journey, can you help us now in this new world where it’s actually quite complicated?” Over 1,400 features on average are being launched by Amazon on a yearly basis. Despite what we hear in the headlines where cloud first companies and the startups of today are absolutely leveraging Lambda out of the gate or containers out of the gate.

There are a whole host of companies that are going through this massive digital disruption trying to compete with these startups. They need a lot of help to reskill their workforce to change the way they think about processes within their organizations between their business development and technology and operations teams. Then ultimately, how do they actually build out a much more agile way of responding to customers? That work requires a company like Rackspace to come and help them navigate through that really large set of features.

There’s No Doubt It’s a Cloud First World

That’s what’s so dynamic about the space. Nobody would have predicted this ten years ago. Even today we’re seeing a ton of momentum with concepts that were very nascent just a few years ago. Kubernetes is a concept where almost every one of our AWS customers at Rackspace, what we call fanatical AWS, are absolutely looking for help on Kubernetes. When we think about Docker a few years ago and Dock Enterprise and we think about Kubernetes and there was that battle, today the battle has been won. Kubernetes is pretty much the de-facto orchestration engine. Nobody would have predicted that a couple of years ago.

Hybrid and multi-cloud are becoming a lot more prevalent. I think even Amazon is very much acknowledging that the big opportunity is in hybrid cloud. If you think about where we are on the technology adoption curve and the trillion dollars of spend that are ultimately going to move, there’s no doubt that it’s a cloud-first world or a destination is the cloud. But the vast majority of the workloads exist in traditional IT. How do we take on that hybrid movement? Outposts is a great acknowledgment of that. Amazon is very aggressively investing and we’re investing with them and helping our customers along their journey effectively.

There’s No Doubt It’s a Cloud First World, Says Rackspace SVP Prashanth Chandasekar

The post There’s No Doubt It’s a Cloud First World, Says Rackspace SVP appeared first on WebProNews.


WebProNews

Posted in IM NewsComments Off

We Want To Be the World’s First Global Sleep Brand, Says Casper CEO

“We really consider ourselves the sleep company,” says Casper co-founder and CEO Philip Krim. “Everything we do is about helping our customers sleep better. It’s about getting a great mattress but it’s about everything that could help you sleep. We’re trying to take products to market that are end to end about sleep solutions. We want to be the world’s first global sleep brand and we think we’re well on our way to doing that.”

Philip Krim, Casper co-founder and CEO, discusses how Casper, a highly successful direct to consumer brand (DTC), is still in the early days of growth in an interview on CNBC:

We Want To Be the World’s First Global Sleep Brand

We actually think Casper stands alone. We really consider ourselves the sleep company. Everything we do is about helping our customers sleep better. We think end to end about sleep. It’s about getting a great mattress but it’s about everything that could help you sleep. In January we launched a technology product, a lighting product, that actually helps you wake up better and fall asleep better. We’re trying to take products to market that are end to end about sleep solutions. We want to be the world’s first global sleep brand and we think we’re well on our way to doing that.

We think we’re really one of the first of our kind. We were a digitally native business, having launched online with Casper.com, but we’re actually now scaling our business offline as well. We’ve opened up 23 retail stores and we have great partners with folks like Target. We believe that we will have a business where no matter how consumers want to shop for our products we have great products and great experiences. We actually think there’s really not a public company comp that’s done that journey.

Repeat Revenue Increases Dramatically As We Launch New Products.

Yesterday we launched our hybrid line which is actually the combination of innerspring technology and foam technology. We launched two different models around that. For us, we’re actually still able to compress those mattresses, ship them anywhere in the country, and they’re really phenomenal products that we’re in development for over a year in our Casper Labs program based in San Francisco. From a cost structure, it works just the same way as our foam mattresses. You can compress it, you can ship it anywhere, it’s super fun to open and they sleep really great.

We make great pillows, we make great sheets, and we make great lighting products. We are seeing higher and higher attachment rates as we launch new products and we’re seeing repeat revenue increase dramatically as we launch new products. We’re only a five-year-old company, actually as of this month. We launched April of 2014. As we get our customers to be a little bit more mature we’re seeing them come back time and time again not just to buy mattresses but to buy our full suite of products. That’s really exciting for us.

We’re In the Early Days of Scaling

We actually changed the way that you would return a mattress. In the industry traditionally it’s a huge pain, but with us, you call us up and we’ll pick up the mattress. You don’t even have to pack it back up, nothing. We will come to pick it and up and then we donate it locally. We appreciate that you gave us a shot. We also are changing the way that people shop for the products. We have our Casper.com website where you can learn all about these great products but we have 23 stores that we’ve opened. We’re opening up over a dozen this quarter, two this week in fact, and those stores are a great complement to the online experience.

We don’t break out profitability overall. Casper has a great product, we have a great business model, and we’re seeing that by taking it to market both online and offline that it’s actually growing our online business in a very efficient way. We think this go to market strategy is working well. We’re in the early days of scaling it and we believe we can keep building this out for years to come.

We Want To Be the World’s First Global Sleep Brand, Says Casper CEO

The post We Want To Be the World’s First Global Sleep Brand, Says Casper CEO appeared first on WebProNews.


WebProNews

Posted in IM NewsComments Off

Verizon is First in the World to Turn on 5G – Launches in 2 Cities – Starts Selling Moto 5G Phone, Says CEO

“It’s a great day for us to be first in the world with 5G smartphones and turning on the network,” says Verizon CEO Hans Vestberg. “We decided to turn it on today (8 days early). We are selling the Moto 5G phone. The z3 is in the stores. You can have a fantastic experience with the Verizon 5G Ultra Wideband network in these two cities (Minneapolis, Chicago areas) right now.”

Hans Vestberg, CEO of Verizon, announces the launch of 5G in two cities and the availability of the Moto 5G phone in an interview on CNBC:

Verizon is First in the World to Turn on 5G

The team has been working relentlessly to give our customers this fantastic experience in 5G and actually our test is going so well. Why wait when we have some good news for our customers. So we decided to turn it on today (8 days early). We are selling the Moto 5G phone. The z3 is in the stores. You can have a fantastic experience with the Verizon 5G Ultra Wideband network in these two cities (Minneapolis, Chicago areas) right now.

You’re going to see many more handsets with 5G coming out this year. We have announced two that we will have in the first half of the year. The Motorola, of course, is the one we are going with right now and we’re going to have a Samsung a little bit later in this quarter. That’s the two and then we have others coming in the second half. We’re going to see more 5G phones than probably were expected. We have at least a good relationship with all of those guys.

5G Rolling Out in Minneapolis and Chicago

When it comes to our rollout we are starting with these two cities right now. We’re going to do more than 30 markets this year and we’re working in all these markets right now. We’re going to turn them up as soon as they’re ready. Then we feel that we can give the experience that we want to give to our customers when it comes to 5G, meaning real 5G, and at the same time have the most reliable 4G network.

We think a lot about our customers and how we’re going to treat them. It’s a great day for us to be first in the world with 5G smartphones and turning on the network. I think that says a lot about the team that I have around me and the partners we have. We’re going to do a lot about education around it. Our stores have been trained now to explain what see you can do with it and, of course, we also talked about the ultra-wideband.

You’re Going to See So Much Innovation With 5G

We’re going to have speeds up to 1 gigabit per second compared to around of 50 megabits per second in 4G. It’s 20 times faster when you’re in the 5G zone. Of course, you can do so much with it at the same time. You’re going to have download speeds up to 300 megabits per second which means that it can take down things much quicker. The latencies will be some 30 milliseconds compared to 100 today.

And that’s just a start of 5G. What we saw in 4G was enormous innovation when you see these type of capabilities coming out on a network. You’re going to see so much innovation on 5G. I said it before. it’s not a small sort of evolution from 4G, it’s a quantum leap going to 5G from 4G. You’re going to see a lot of innovation and new applications coming on top of the 5G networks.

Verizon is First in the World to Turn on 5G, Says Verizon CEO Hans Vestberg

The post Verizon is First in the World to Turn on 5G – Launches in 2 Cities – Starts Selling Moto 5G Phone, Says CEO appeared first on WebProNews.


WebProNews

Posted in IM NewsComments Off

Claire Giovino: From Zero To Six Figures, Behind The Scenes Of The First Year Of InboxDone.com

[ Download MP3 | Transcript Coming Soon | iTunes | Soundcloud | Raw RSS ] Today’s podcast is a little bit different. My guest is Claire Giovino, who is my partner and co-founder in our startup company InboxDone.com. Claire is also the voice behind the intro to this podcast, so you might recognize her immediately :-) . […]

The post Claire Giovino: From Zero To Six Figures, Behind The Scenes Of The First Year Of InboxDone.com appeared first on Yaro.Blog.

Entrepreneurs-Journey.com by Yaro Starak

Posted in IM NewsComments Off

Autonomous Driving for Trucks Will Happen First, Says Full Truck Alliance CFO

“Our view is that the commercialization of autonomous driving for passenger vehicles will probably take a bit longer than people would think,” says Richard Zhang, CFO of Full Truck Alliance. “We think the commercialization of autonomous driving for trucks will probably take place a lot sooner than it will take place in the passenger car vehicle sector.”

Full Truck Alliance is a multi-billion dollar valued company that is becoming the Uber of trucks throughout China. The fragmentation of the trucking industry in China between independent truckers and shippers has resulted in an empty load rate of over 40 percent, about four times higher than in the United States. The Full Truck Alliance app and online platform connects shippers to truckers in real-time enabling huge reductions in empty loads.

Richard Zhang, CFO of Full Truck Alliance based in China, discussed the company’s future in an interview on CNBC International TV this morning:

Full Truck Alliance in China is the Uber for Trucks

The problem we’re trying to solve is very simple because there are high inefficiencies between matching with the truck drivers and also matching with the shippers. The empty load rate in the US is only ten percent while the empty load rate in China is 40 percent. The empty load rate is very similar to the vacancy rate in the hotel business. The reason is that the market here is highly fragmented. You have highly fragmented truck drivers and highly fragmented shippers, lots of SMEs.

Before we came into existence the matching between the truck drivers and shippers were taking place across a thousand offline marketplaces in China. What we have been trying to do is bring that offline marketplace online and use our algorithms in the back office to match automatically the truck drivers and the shippers. We are trying to reduce that empty load rate to well below 40 percent.

Monetization Via Membership and Uber-Like Fees

Our monetization strategy for Full Truck Alliance is as a product of a merger between two companies, Truck Alliance and also Yunmanman a little over a year ago. Post-merger we started monetization and the monetization takes place in two ways. Number one is we are charging a membership fee for the shippers and also very similar to Uber or DiDi we’re charging a take rate on the transactions themselves.

We were very close to achieving our 2018 profit objective. We are actually very marginally close to break-even at the current moment and we have no doubt that we’re going be making earnings in 2019.

Autonomous Driving for Trucks Will Happen First

Our view is that the commercialization of autonomous driving for passenger vehicles will probably take a bit longer than people would think. We think the commercialization of autonomous driving for trucks will probably take place a lot sooner than it will take place in the passenger car vehicle sector. Therefore we are deploying a certain amount of resources into that sector in the form of investment.

We have decided to be a strategic investor in an autonomous driving truck company for them to actually develop that technology and for us to actually use. The mandate for the partner is to actually put a fleet on the road in China to start working with our shippers in the next 12 to 24 months. That’s our mandate and so it depends on how successful they’re going to be at executing our strategy.

The post Autonomous Driving for Trucks Will Happen First, Says Full Truck Alliance CFO appeared first on WebProNews.


WebProNews

Posted in IM NewsComments Off

12 Methods to Get from Blank Page to First Draft

If you’re like me, after taking some time off from writing, you’re refreshed and champing at the bit to translate…

The post 12 Methods to Get from Blank Page to First Draft appeared first on Copyblogger.


Copyblogger

Posted in IM NewsComments Off

Should You Trust Influencers to Promote Your Brand? Consider These Problems First

Influencer marketing is drawing more and more suspicion from brands and advertisers alike. There is a growing concern in some business sectors that consumer trust in influencers is waning or has reached its peak. Empirical data, however, shows that influencers still have a lot of pull. They can still raise brand awareness, push customer loyalty, and boost engagement. One study by Marvrck also shows that cost per acquisition (CPA) was also far lower with influencer marketing compared to other types of advertising like Facebook ads.

cost per acquisition

While there’s no denying that influencer marketing works, it has a lot of issues that have resulted in brands having a general lack of trust for influencers.

4 Reasons Why Brands Don’t Trust Influencer Marketing

1. Hard to Measure ROI

The majority of brands find that choosing the right metrics to use and measuring return on investment are the main challenges they face when it comes to influencer marketing.

Every marketing campaign should be based on measurable objectives, like an increase in revenue, higher brand awareness, or more social media followers. You need to determine your objective first. Once that’s done, you can then identify how you will track your KPIs and evaluate how the content or an influencer has performed.

Luckily, most of the tools used in tracking conventional and digital marketing are also appropriate for influencer marketing. For instance, tools like Google Analytics, promo codes, giveaways, vanity URLs, and UTM parameters can all be used to measure the results of an influencer marketing campaign. Social media platforms like Pinterest are also taking steps in this direction by giving access to their APIs to ensure that influencers and marketers can work well together.

2. Fake Followers and Fake Accounts

Fake followers and fraudulent accounts are also behind the mistrust of influencers. According to a New York Times report, this practice is so rampant that about 15 percent of Twitter profiles are fakes and many celebrities and influencers buy followers to inflate their perceived social influence.

Image result for fake followers statistics

Too often, brands look for influencers with the largest number of followers and pay big money for access to them. So it’s not surprising that some influencers pad their numbers with fake accounts. Unfortunately, the practice messes up one crucial element of this marketing methodinfluencing another individual. After all, you can’t wield your influence over an imaginary person.

To combat this problem, brands should focus more on quality than quantity. Instead of looking at the numbers, they should concentrate on the kind of consumers that follow the influencer, and whether said influencer is suitable for the brand. Social media platforms should also put more effort into cracking down on dubious accounts. 

More importantly, the influencers should hold themselves accountable and check for fake followers, even if it means they have to scroll through their list of followers and vet each one.

3. A Million Followers Doesn’t Mean More Profit

A social media account might have tens of thousands of followers but not have much influence. There are people who are influential in one area but not in another. For instance, an account that specializes in memes might have a million followers but those followers are not there to buy anything. They just follow the account for its entertainment value.

Brands should first determine whether an influencer is considered trustworthy by their followers or just a digital performer. The former has an impact on a follower’s buying decision while the latter doesn’t. Companies can tell which is which by their posts. Consumers respond to honesty and passion, and a good influencer shows these in their posts.

4. Competition Between Influencers and Marketers

If your brand has a marketing team, they may view influencers as a direct threat. This implied threat is due to the fact that influencers work in direct competition with traditional marketing strategies. Moreover, a lot of marketers don’t totally trust social influencers with regards to content development.

To get past this problem, you’ll need to understand how influencer marketing actually works. Influencers have to be authentic and strive to show this in the tone and passion of their posts. In contrast, your marketers need to double check everything or have some say in the content creation process. You’ll need to find a good compromise between the two groups to prevent conflict.

Should Brands Still Trust Influencers?

Many consumers have relationships with influencers that are more like friendships. And according to Neilsen, 92 percent of consumers trust the recommendations of family and friends. For this reason, influencers still have the power to greatly impact a brand. However, the problems that come with influencer marketing have gone largely unresolved.

Part of the problem is that these issues have only recently come to the forefront, so best practices have not yet been established. Brands and influencers are still learning and adjusting. 

Moving foward, more influencers will need to audit their followers and check for fake accounts. Branded content should merge well with integrated content, and sponsored posts should be kept to a minimum. Meanwhile, it’s imperative for brands to thoroughly research their potential partners, making sure they only work with credible influencers and choose the right platforms to promote their products and services.

The post Should You Trust Influencers to Promote Your Brand? Consider These Problems First appeared first on WebProNews.


WebProNews

Posted in IM NewsComments Off

Internal Linking & Mobile First: Large Site Crawl Paths in 2018 & Beyond

Posted by Tom.Capper

By now, you’ve probably heard as much as you can bear about mobile first indexing. For me, there’s been one topic that’s been conspicuously missing from all this discussion, though, and that’s the impact on internal linking and previous internal linking best practices.

In the past, there have been a few popular methods for providing crawl paths for search engines — bulky main navigations, HTML sitemap-style pages that exist purely for internal linking, or blocks of links at the bottom of indexed pages. Larger sites have typically used at least two or often three of these methods. I’ll explain in this post why all of these are now looking pretty shaky, and what I suggest you do about it.

Quick refresher: WTF are “internal linking” & “mobile-first,” Tom?

Internal linking is and always has been a vital component of SEO — it’s easy to forget in all the noise about external link building that some of our most powerful tools to affect the link graph are right under our noses. If you’re looking to brush up on internal linking in general, it’s a topic that gets pretty complex pretty quickly, but there are a couple of resources I can recommend to get started:

I’ve also written in the past that links may be mattering less and less as a ranking factor for the most competitive terms, and though that may be true, they’re still the primary way you qualify for that competition.

A great example I’ve seen recently of what happens if you don’t have comprehensive internal linking is eflorist.co.uk. (Disclaimer: eFlorist is not a client or prospective client of Distilled, nor are any other sites mentioned in this post)

eFlorist has local landing pages for all sorts of locations, targeting queries like “Flower delivery in [town].” However, even though these pages are indexed, they’re not linked to internally. As a result, if you search for something like “flower delivery in London,” despite eFlorist having a page targeted at this specific query (which can be found pretty much only through use of advanced search operators), they end up ranking on page 2 with their “flowers under £30” category page:

¯\_(ツ)_/¯

If you’re looking for a reminder of what mobile-first indexing is and why it matters, these are a couple of good posts to bring you up to speed:

In short, though, Google is increasingly looking at pages as they appear on mobile for all the things it was previously using desktop pages for — namely, establishing ranking factors, the link graph, and SEO directives. You may well have already seen an alert from Google Search Console telling you your site has been moved over to primarily mobile indexing, but if not, it’s likely not far off.

Get to the point: What am I doing wrong?

If you have more than a handful of landing pages on your site, you’ve probably given some thought in the past to how Google can find them and how to make sure they get a good chunk of your site’s link equity. A rule of thumb often used by SEOs is how many clicks a landing page is from the homepage, also known as “crawl depth.”

Mobile-first indexing impacts this on two fronts:

  1. Some of your links aren’t present on mobile (as is common), so your internal linking simply won’t work in a world where Google is going primarily with the mobile-version of your page
  2. If your links are visible on mobile, they may be hideous or overwhelming to users, given the reduced on-screen real estate vs. desktop

If you don’t believe me on the first point, check out this Twitter conversation between Will Critchlow and John Mueller:

In particular, that section I’ve underlined in red should be of concern — it’s unclear how much time we have, but sooner or later, if your internal linking on the mobile version of your site doesn’t cut it from an SEO perspective, neither does your site.

And for the links that do remain visible, an internal linking structure that can be rationalized on desktop can quickly look overbearing on mobile. Check out this example from Expedia.co.uk’s “flights to London” landing page:

Many of these links are part of the site-wide footer, but they vary according to what page you’re on. For example, on the “flights to Australia” page, you get different links, allowing a tree-like structure of internal linking. This is a common tactic for larger sites.

In this example, there’s more unstructured linking both above and below the section screenshotted. For what it’s worth, although it isn’t pretty, I don’t think this is terrible, but it’s also not the sort of thing I can be particularly proud of when I go to explain to a client’s UX team why I’ve asked them to ruin their beautiful page design for SEO reasons.

I mentioned earlier that there are three main methods of establishing crawl paths on large sites: bulky main navigations, HTML-sitemap-style pages that exist purely for internal linking, or blocks of links at the bottom of indexed pages. I’ll now go through these in turn, and take a look at where they stand in 2018.

1. Bulky main navigations: Fail to scale

The most extreme example I was able to find of this is from Monoprice.com, with a huge 711 links in the sitewide top-nav:

Here’s how it looks on mobile:

This is actually fairly usable, but you have to consider the implications of having this many links on every page of your site — this isn’t going to concentrate equity where you need it most. In addition, you’re potentially asking customers to do a lot of work in terms of finding their way around such a comprehensive navigation.

I don’t think mobile-first indexing changes the picture here much; it’s more that this was never the answer in the first place for sites above a certain size. Many sites have tens of thousands (or more), not hundreds of landing pages to worry about. So simply using the main navigation is not a realistic option, let alone an optimal option, for creating crawl paths and distributing equity in a proportionate or targeted way.

2. HTML sitemaps: Ruined by the counterintuitive equivalence of noindex,follow & noindex,nofollow

This is a slightly less common technique these days, but still used reasonably widely. Take this example from Auto Trader UK:

The idea is that this page is linked to from Auto Trader’s footer, and allows link equity to flow through into deeper parts of the site.

However, there’s a complication: this page in an ideal world be “noindex,follow.” However, it turns out that over time, Google ends up treating “noindex,follow” like “noindex,nofollow.” It’s not 100% clear what John Mueller meant by this, but it does make sense that given the low crawl priority of “noindex” pages, Google could eventually stop crawling them altogether, causing them to behave in effect like “noindex,nofollow.” Anecdotally, this is also how third-party crawlers like Moz and Majestic behave, and it’s how I’ve seen Google behave with test pages on my personal site.

That means that at best, Google won’t discover new links you add to your HTML sitemaps, and at worst, it won’t pass equity through them either. The jury is still out on this worst case scenario, but it’s not an ideal situation in either case.

So, you have to index your HTML sitemaps. For a large site, this means you’re indexing potentially dozens or hundreds of pages that are just lists of links. It is a viable option, but if you care about the quality and quantity of pages you’re allowing into Google’s index, it might not be an option you’re so keen on.

3. Link blocks on landing pages: Good, bad, and ugly, all at the same time

I already mentioned that example from Expedia above, but here’s another extreme example from the Kayak.co.uk homepage:

Example 1

Example 2

It’s no coincidence that both these sites come from the travel search vertical, where having to sustain a massive number of indexed pages is a major challenge. Just like their competitor, Kayak have perhaps gone overboard in the sheer quantity here, but they’ve taken it an interesting step further — notice that the links are hidden behind dropdowns.

This is something that was mentioned in the post from Bridget Randolph I mentioned above, and I agree so much I’m just going to quote her verbatim:

Note that with mobile-first indexing, content which is collapsed or hidden in tabs, etc. due to space limitations will not be treated differently than visible content (as it may have been previously), since this type of screen real estate management is actually a mobile best practice.

Combined with a more sensible quantity of internal linking, and taking advantage of the significant height of many mobile landing pages (i.e., this needn’t be visible above the fold), this is probably the most broadly applicable method for deep internal linking at your disposal going forward. As always, though, we need to be careful as SEOs not to see a working tactic and rush to push it to its limits — usability and moderation are still important, just as with overburdened main navigations.

Summary: Bite the on-page linking bullet, but present it well

Overall, the most scalable method for getting large numbers of pages crawled, indexed, and ranking on your site is going to be on-page linking — simply because you already have a large number of pages to place the links on, and in all likelihood a natural “tree” structure, by very nature of the problem.

Top navigations and HTML sitemaps have their place, but lack the scalability or finesse to deal with this situation, especially given what we now know about Google’s treatment of “noindex,follow” tags.

However, the more we emphasize mobile experience, while simultaneously relying on this method, the more we need to be careful about how we present it. In the past, as SEOs, we might have been fairly nervous about placing on-page links behind tabs or dropdowns, just because it felt like deceiving Google. And on desktop, that might be true, but on mobile, this is increasingly going to become best practice, and we have to trust Google to understand that.

All that said, I’d love to hear your strategies for grappling with this — let me know in the comments below!

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!


Moz Blog

Posted in IM NewsComments Off

Advert