Tag Archive | "Campaigns"

Google Ads’ switch to standard delivery starts Oct. 7 for Search, Shopping campaigns, shared budgets

An updated list of error codes for API clients and scripts is also available.



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YouTube ‘Video Reach’ campaigns let advertisers upload multiple videos for single campaign

Ford reports the new offering reduced campaign costs by more than 20% compared to its previous YouTube campaigns.



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Search Ads 360 rolls out auction-time bidding for Google Search campaigns

It enables access to Google Ads’ Smart Bidding capabilities.



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How AMP technology can upgrade your email campaigns

Accelerated mobile page (AMP) technology is what going to revolutionize bulk email marketing as we know it today.

It enables to add dynamic content to previously static flat email pages, and lets recipients react to it right in the message. To view extra photos or scroll through price offers, customers no longer need to download the site page, open a new tab or click on the link – now they can do it without leaving the email body. Supported by Gmail and Mail.ru and adapted by major online platforms, it will soon extend to other email clients and brands.

How it works

AMP technology is a series of HTML tags backed up by CSS and JS. It aims to speed up the mobile web and optimize page performance, creating new ways for more versatile customer engagement. To send AMP-powered bulk email campaigns, you have to undergo registration at Google as a dynamic content sender and make sure your email automation service provider supports this technology. As for today, the following companies have announced AMP support:

  • eSputnik
  • Stripo
  • Litmus
  • Amazon SES and Amazon Pinpoint
  • SparkPost
  • Twilio Sendgrid

This list will definitely grow, as gearing emails with app functionality is a great opportunity to increase the ROI of your email marketing campaigns.

Benefits of AMP technology

  • Interactive elements increase the recipients’ engagement and as a result the time spent on the emails. The more time a subscriber spends on the email, the more chances they would respond to the offeror make any other active action.
  • Email recipients can directly interact with the content without the necessity to download separate pages. It saves time and makes the shopping experience easier and more satisfactory. And satisfied buyers are more likely to turn into repeat customers.
  • Easy to use, AMP-powered messages improve usability which again leads to bigger responsiveness and engagement.
  • AMP messages do not involve third parties, and the conversation goes only between a sender and a recipient.

Where to apply AMP technology

1. Online shopping

Though a regular flat email can also contain interactive elements like carousels, countdown timers or rollovers, customers should still land on a webpage to browse a catalog or check current product availability. An AMP-powered campaign allows a complete checkout process directly in the email. You can decide upon size/color/material and complete the order without leaving the email. The same approach can be integrated with cart abandonment campaigns allowing people to revise their abandoned carts and make necessary changes if needed.

2. Booking

AMP email can benefit travel industry brands by enabling people to check available tickets, rooms, car trips, or tables at your favorite restaurant. Apart from simply seeing how many offers are left, you can also choose a seat number or specify a location. For example, you might state you would prefer a back row buying a movie ticket or a window seat when reserving a flight.

3. Delivery

Companies providing delivery services can send AMP emails that will allow real-time tracking of the courier with their order rather than just notify the status change.

4. Event invitations

Backed up by AMP technology, invitation emails now can let recipients RSVP to an event and make the necessary comments, for example, confirm participation in a webinar or choose the time for a skype call.

5. Surveys and polls

AMP technology can generate benign conditions for expanding survey emails, making it easy to participate in polls and fill out questionnaires. It also makes possible leaving feedback or review in the real-time, seeing all updates on the existing comments.

6. Financial sector

Adopting AMP emails can also be transformative for the financial industry. An online calculator form built within the email will help clarify the loan details, perform an estate appraisal or make other basic calculations straight in the email.

7. Subscription

With the help of AMP technology, you can manage your subscription in a more convenient way. Now you can not only subscribe to newsletters but also choose the time and frequency of these messages.

How to start sending AMP emails

Before you dive into the creation of AMP campaigns, make sure both email agent of the recipient and your ESP support the AMP technology. The next step is to contact Google as a dynamic content sender and ask them to add your email address to the whitelist. Here is how to do it:

To register with Google, create two similar emails: HTML email and an email with an AMP part

how to use amp in emails

HTML – email

AMP HTML – email

  1. Add dynamic content and make sure AMP elements get validated.
  2. Test whether the AMP campaign has the appropriate appearance and behavior.
  3. Verify your sender domain with SPF, DKIM, and DMARC.
  4. Send both emails from your corporate email address to ampforemail.whitelisting@gmail.com.
  5. Fill in the Sender Registration Form.
  6. Wait till Google sends you an email notifying that you have been approved for sending AMP email to Gmail accounts.

Keep in mind that your authorization may take several days after which you will be able to send AMP-powered emails.

Though the technology of accelerated mobile pages is still under development, its potential is great. Billions of emails are sent on a daily basis, and almost 70% of them are read on mobile devices. This means that a bigger part of the interaction between the brand and its customers happens via emails and SMS campaigns.

AMP technology, when smartly integrated into the overall marketing strategy, will definitely make this interaction more beneficial for each party. Customers will get more convenient and satisfying interaction experience, and companies will be able to grow email responsiveness and encourage more active actions.

Zhanna Tarakanova is PR Manager at eSputnik.

The post How AMP technology can upgrade your email campaigns appeared first on Search Engine Watch.

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How YouTube can help your non-video campaigns in Google Ads

Here’s how you can boost campaigns with video in lightbox ads, display, universal apps and more.



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Google expands App campaigns search inventory on iOS browsers

Conversions won’t be available via third-party tools.



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Build your PPC campaigns with this mini campaign builder script for Google Ads

This script lets you build or add keywords to your Google campaigns following standard best practice.



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Can "Big Content" Link Building Campaigns Really Work?

Posted by willcritchlow

There’s a lot of material out there, on this site and others, about the importance of link-building. Normally, its effectiveness is either taken for granted or viewed as implied by ranking factor studies — the latter of which doesn’t necessarily show that correlated factors actually drive performance. The real picture is one in which links clearly remain important, but where their role is nuanced.

For a while now, I’ve wanted to dig a little deeper into an individual link-building campaign that takes place over a relatively short period of time. I wanted to see what results (besides just link-based metrics) could be attributed to it.

In this post, I will try to pin down the effects that came from the campaign and show that yes, getting a bunch of links from the success of some highly visible “big content’ can drive improved rankings

The reason you don’t see more posts like this one is noisy data — so much goes on with a website’s performance that it can be difficult to draw a hard and fast connection between a campaign and its results for a business’s bottom line. This is especially true for link-building, for three reasons:

  • Websites are naturally accruing links anyway — both the target of the campaign and their competitors
  • To some extent, we anticipate a domain-wide effect, which will as such be proportionately small and hard to pin down vs. noise from the algorithm and competitor activity
  • Links do not have such a step-change impact as technical fixes or creation of new landing pages

However, at Distilled we recently had an opportunity with a particularly strong piece on a niche site to analyze a situation where the impact of our work ought to be more clearly visible among the broader noise. Take a look at these graphs, which show the linking-root domain acquisition of a client of ours over the last two years, as measured by Majestic and Ahrefs respectively:

See what I mean about noise? And I’m saying this is an unusually clear cut case. We actually built nine creative pieces, with link acquisition as one of the goals, for this client, over a two-year period. We’ve talked before about the campaign as a whole, here. There’s one that stands out in both graphs, though which is the one that launched in March 2018.

This gives us a rare, valuable opportunity to see which other metrics, which might have more direct business value, had noticeable changes around that time.

What might we expect to happen?

The theory is simple: Links remain part of Google’s algorithm, and so more links to a site mean better rankings. However, the reality is more complex — in our experience, creative pieces as link-building assets tend to result in two types of links:

  • Links to the creative piece, which in turn links, typically, to the site’s homepage
  • Links directly to the homepage of the client site — e.g. “Research by client (client.com) indicates that…”

The interesting thing here is that for many sites, the homepage is not a core landing page. I’ve written before about how it’s almost impossible to have a good mental model for internal link equity flow, which makes the actual impact of the piece on core pages almost certainly not zero, but otherwise hard to predict. On the same subject, I’d also recommend this video by Dixon Jones at Majestic.

In a similar vein, we also know that the complexities of PageRank are themselves only a part of the unknowable complexities of Google’s ranking algorithm, meaning we can’t guarantee that adding links always moves the needle. I recently recorded this Whiteboard Friday where I mention some recent research by my colleague Tom Capper, which shows how unpredictable these effects can be.

The particular client example I’ve been referring to in this post had two things going for it which, again, brought unusual clarity to these effects:

  1. The homepage was, in fact, a core ranking URL
  2. It was struggling to make its way onto page 1 for many reasonable target terms

Both of these ought to make it an ideal candidate for clearcut benefits from high-quality link building. (This isn’t to say link-building cannot work if these criteria are not met — just that the results will be harder to analyze!)

1st order results

Precisely because of the difficulty in analysis mentioned above, we find clients normally prefer to assess the performance of link-building campaigns in terms of 1st order benefits — by which I mean the performance of the actual creative piece, rather than their commercial landing pages.

The particular piece that stands out in those link acquisition graphs above earned the following 1st order benefits (and I’ve included graphs from our internal tracking platform so you can get a feel for the pace of acquisition):

228 LRDs peak (204 “fresh” index shown below), of which ~145 within a month of launch:

2,140 Facebook shares at the peak, of which ~1,750 within a month of launch:

82,584 landings in Google Analytics, of which ~67,000 within a month of launch:

I mentioned above that not all links tend to be directed at the piece itself, with journalists instead often referencing the homepage. 145 (domain-unique) links were directed at this piece by mid-April, but you’ll notice that March beat an average month by ~200 LRDs, and April also outperformed by ~100. By my back-of-the-envelope maths, you might want to claim as many as 300 LRDs driven to the whole domain by this piece, but your opinion may differ!

Showing the ways it worked

Right, I did say I’d link this at least to rankings, didn’t I?

Remember: This was part of a campaign of 9 pieces, and it launched mid-March, with most 1st order metrics, or leading indicators, coming through within a month (and no major technical changes around this time). There is some signal in among the noise here. Check out this graph, showing the number of keywords ranked for, according to Ahrefs:

Notice that change in gradient after the launch? (And, for the cynics among you, the piece itself only ranks for 20 keywords itself according to this same data source — that wasn’t a primary goal with this content).

Here are the rankings for the client’s (fairly ambitious!) target keywords:

I’d particularly draw your attention to the movement from the “11–20” to “4–10” group, which is consistent with the research by my colleague Tom Capper that I mentioned above. (Sidenote: it was nice to see the client’s Domain Authority increase relative to their competitive set in the recent update. The improvements to DA, aimed at making it better at predicting ranking ability, appear to have worked in this sample-size-one case!).

You can see this pattern more clearly in this graph, which we presented to the client when the campaign concluded late last year:

This effect is surprisingly clear-cut, but it might well be that to continue moving up the SERP, from positions 4–10 to positions 1–3, a very different type of work is needed — perhaps one emphasizing brand, or intent matching.

How can I do this for my site/client?

Here are some useful resources to help when starting on your creative campaigns:

Mark – How to make sticky content

Hannah – What is content strategy

Leonie – How to make award winning creative content – Part 1

Leonie – How to make award winning creative content – Part 2

Conclusion: Big content for links can work

As I mentioned above, it’s surprisingly unusual to see such a clear and obvious case of link-building work moving rankings in a lasting way. This has certain similarities with other such cases we’ve seen in recent years, though:

  • The site started fairly small (if nothing else, this makes the signal bigger relative to the noise)
  • It had target terms that were on the cusp of first-page rankings
  • Some search competitors had far stronger domains

The reports that “links are dead” have, apparently, been greatly exaggerated — instead, it’s just that the picture has gotten more complex.

Obviously Distilled clients are only a finite sample, however, so I’d love to hear your experiences of successful link-building, and, crucially, the kind of situations in which they moved rankings, in the comments below!

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Campaign-level conversion actions now live for Google search, display campaigns

Campaign action sets are also available to optimize campaigns for multiple conversion actions.



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SearchCap: DuckDuckGo growth, YouTube campaigns & ABM measurements

Below is what happened in search today, as reported on Search Engine Land and from other places across the web.



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