Tag Archive | "Away"

3 Important SEO Steps to Take Right Away

"True masters of search engine optimization are masters of listening and empathy." – Jerod Morris

What if we’re thinking about SEO all wrong?

You won’t be shocked to see such a question posed on this site — one that harbors posts in its archive with headlines like SEO is Dead and What if You Could Simply Eliminate SEO from Your Life?

Don’t get me wrong: we’re not anti-SEO.

Heck, we were recently awarded a U.S. patent for the Content Optimizer we developed that now powers the SEO tools bundled with our premium WordPress hosting.

We’re just anti some of the misguided notions and incomplete narratives about SEO that masquerade as good advice.

And one of the most fundamental mistakes I see people make is not fully appreciating the full breadth of each of the three terms that comprise S-E-O: Search. Engine. Optimization.

Notice the placement of that first period after “Search.”

It’s time to think beyond traditional notions of “search engines”

It’s easy to group the terms “search” and “engine” together. And for a long, long time, it made sense to do so.

When we used to discuss “search engine optimization,” we were mostly talking about searches typed into Google, perhaps Bing, or (going back further) Yahoo.

But now it’s 2017.

The new search

Gone are the days of only typed searches. People now conduct more and more searches with voice commands. A recent article on Forbes, 2017 Will Be the Year of Voice Search, makes a compelling case.

And who knows what will happen when we all have chips implanted in our brains that can read our thoughts. We might just be able to think our search and get results via the screens on our contact lenses. ”</p

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Moz Transitions: Rand to Step Away from Operations and into Advisory Role in Early 2018

Posted by SarahBird

I have some big news to share with you.

As many of you know, three and a half years ago, Rand began to shift his role at Moz. He transitioned from CEO into a product architect role where he could focus his passion and have hands-on impact in evolving our tools. Now, over the next 6 to 9 months he will transition into a supporting role as a Moz Associate. He will continue to be a passionate speaker and evangelist, and you’ll still see his enthusiastic face in Whiteboard Fridays, on the Moz Blog, and on various conference stages. And of course, he is one of our largest shareholders and will remain Chairman of the Board.

This is hard. Rand started Moz (formerly seomoz.org) over 16 years ago as a blog to record what he was learning about this new field. He and his co-founder Gillian Muessig created a marketing agency that focused on helping websites get found in search. They launched their first SAAS software product in February 2007, and I joined the company nine months later as the 8th employee. We’ve come a long way. Today, we have over 36,000 customers, 160 team members, a strong values-based culture, great investors, over $ 42 million in annual revenue last year, and a large and growing community of marketers. So many people have helped us reach this point.

What else is next for Rand? We’re excited to find out. His book about the last 16 years at Moz comes out next year.

When you see Rand, please show him gratitude and support. He is an incredibly talented, passionate, and productive individual with a commitment to helping others. I know he’s going to continue to make marketing better and spread TAGFEE in all his future roles.

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Rand Fishkin to step away from day-to-day operations at Moz

Moz’s founder is moving into an advisory role at the company early next year.

The post Rand Fishkin to step away from day-to-day operations at Moz appeared first on Search Engine Land.



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Giving Away the Farm: Proposal Development for New SEO Agencies

Posted by BrianChilds

There’s a huge difference between making money from selling SEO and actually making a living — or making a difference, for that matter. A new marketing agency will quickly discover that surviving on $ 1,000 contracts is challenging. It takes time to learn the client and their customers, and poorly written contracts can lead to scope creep and dissatisfied clients.

It’s common for agencies to look for ways to streamline operations to assist with scaling their business, but one area you don’t want to streamline is the proposal research process. I actually suggest going in the opposite direction: create proposals that give away the farm.

Details matter, both to you and your prospective client

I know what you’re thinking: Wait a minute! I don’t want to do a bunch of work for free!

I too am really sensitive to the idea that a prospective client may attempt to be exploitative. I think it’s a risk worth taking. Outlining the exact scope of services forces you to do in-depth research on your prospect’s website and business, to describe in detail what you’re going to deliver. Finding tools and processes to scale the research process is great, but don’t skip it. Detailing your findings builds trust, establishes your team as a high-quality service provider, and will likely make you stand out amongst a landscape of standard-language proposals.

Be exceptional. Here’s why I think this is particularly important for the proposal development process.

Avoid scope creep & unrealistic expectations

Just like the entrepreneur that doesn’t want to tell anyone their amazing idea without first obtaining an NDA, new SEO agencies may be inclined to obscure their deliverables in standard proposal language out of fear that their prospect will take their analysis and run. Generic proposal language is sometimes also used to reduce the time and effort involved in getting the contract out the door.

This may result in two unintended outcomes:

  1. Lack of specific deliverables can lead to contract scope creep.
  2. It can make you lazy and you end up walking into a minefield.

Companies that are willing to invest larger sums of money in SEO tend to have higher expectations, and this cuts both ways. Putting in the work to craft a detailed proposal not only shows that you actually care about their business, but it also helps manage the contract’s inevitable growth when you’re successful.

Misalignment of goals or timelines can sour a relationship quickly. Churn in your contracts is inevitable, but it’s much easier to increase your annual revenue by retaining a client for a few more months than trying to go out and find a replacement. Monetizing your work effectively and setting expectations is an excellent way to make sure the relationship is built on firm ground.

Trust is key

Trust is foundational to SEO: building trustworthy sites, creating valuable and trustworthy content, becoming a trusted resource for your community that’s worth linking to. Google rewards this kind of intent.

Trust is an ethos; as an SEO, you’re a trust champion. You can build trust with a prospect by being transparent and providing overwhelming value in your proposal. Tell your clients exactly what they need to do based on what you discover in your research.

This approach also greases the skids a little when approaching the prospect for the first time. Imagine the difference between a first touch with your prospect when you request a chance to discuss research you’ve compiled, versus a call to simply talk about general SEO value. By developing an approach that feels less like a sales process, you can navigate around the psychological tripwires that make people put up barriers or question your trustworthiness.

This is also referred to as “consultative sales.” Some best practices that business owners typically respond well to are:

  • Competitive research. A common question businesses will ask about SEO relates to keywords: What are my competitors ranking for? What keywords have they optimized their homepage for? One thing I like to do is plug the industry leader’s website into Open Site Explorer and show what content is generating the most links. Exporting the Top Pages report from OSE makes for a great leave-behind.
  • Top questions people are asking. Research forum questions that relate to the industry or products your prospect sells. When people ask questions on Yahoo Answers or Quora, they’re often doing so because they can’t find a good answer using search. A couple of screenshots can spark a discussion around how your prospective client’s site can add value to those online discussions.

Yes, by creating a more detailed proposal you do run the risk that your target company will walk away with the analysis. But if you suspect that the company is untrustworthy, then I’d advise walking away before even building the analysis in the first place; just try getting paid on time from an untrustworthy company.

Insights can be worth more

By creating a very transparent, “give away the farm”-type document, SEOs empower themselves to have important discussions prior to signing a contract. Things like:

  • What are the business goals this company wants to focus on?
  • Who are the people they want to attract?
  • What products or pages are they focused on?

You’ll have to understand at least this much to set up appropriate targeting, so all the better to document this stuff beforehand. And remember, having these conversations is also an investment in your prospect’s time — and there’s some psychology around getting your target company to invest in you. It’s called “advancement” of the sale. By getting your prospect to agree to a small, clearly defined commitment, it pulls them further down the sales funnel.

In the case of research, you may choose to ask the client for permission to conduct further research and report on it at a specified time in the future. You can use this as an opportunity to anchor a price for what that research would cost, which frames the scope of service prices later on.

By giving away the farm, you’ll start off the relationship as a trusted advisor. And even if you don’t get the job to do the SEO work itself, it’s possible you can develop a retainer where you help your prospect manage digital marketing generally.

Prepping the farm for sale

It goes without saying, but making money from SEO requires having the right tools for the job. If you’re brand-new to the craft, I suggest practicing by auditing a small site. (Try using the site audit template we provide in the site audit bootcamp.) Get comfortable with the tools, imagine what you would prioritize, and maybe even do some free work for a site to test out how long it takes to complete relatively small tasks.

Imagine you were going to approach that website and suggest changes. Ask yourself:

  • Who are they selling to?
  • What keywords and resources does this target user value?
  • What changes would you make that would improve search rank position for those terms?
  • What would you do first?
  • How long would it take? (In real human time, not starving-artist-who-never-sleeps time.)

Some of the tools that I find most helpful are:

  • Moz Pro Campaigns > Custom Reports. This is an easy one. Create a Moz Pro campaign (campaigns are projects that analyze the SEO performance of a website over time) and then select “Custom Reports” in the top-right of the Campaign interface. Select the modules you want to include — site crawl and keyword rankings against potential competitors are good ones — and then offer to send this report to your prospect for free. It’s a lot harder for a customer to turn something off than it is to turn something on. Give away a custom report and then set up time to talk through the results on a weekly basis.
  • Builtwith.com. This free service allows you to investigate a number of attributes related to a website, including the marketing software installed. Similar to a WHOIS search, I use this to understand whether the prospect is overloaded with software or if they completely lack any marketing automation. This can be helpful for suggesting tools that will improve their insights immediately. Who better to help them implement those tools or provide a discount than you?
  • Keyword Explorer > Lists. Create a list in Keyword Explorer and look for the prevalence of SERP features. This can tell you a lot about what kinds of content are valuable to their potential visitor. Do images show up a lot? What about videos? These could be opportunities for your customer.
  • MozBar. Use the Page Analysis tab in MozBar to assess some of the website’s most important pages. Check page load speed in the General Attributes section. Also see if they have enticing titles and descriptions.
  • Site crawl. If you don’t have Moz Pro, I recommend downloading Screaming Frog. It can crawl up to 500 pages on a site for free and then allow you to export the results into a .csv file. Look for anything that could be blocking traffic to the site or reducing the chance that pages are getting indexed, such as 4XX series errors or an overly complex robots.txt file. Remedying these can be quick wins that provide a lot of value. If you start a Moz Pro campaign, you can see how these issues are reduced over time.

Want to learn how to add SEO to your existing portfolio of marketing services?

Starting on April 4th, 2017, Moz is offering a 3-day training seminar on How to Add SEO to Your Agency. This class will be every Tuesday for 3 weeks and will cover some of the essentials for successfully bringing SEO into your portfolio.

Sign up for the seminar!

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!


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MarTech Europe is just 2 weeks away – don’t miss out!

As marketers, we all strive to create the ultimate customer experience. And in two weeks, experts are gathering at MarTech Europe in London to share insights into how they’ve aligned their organisations’ technology, marketing and management to serve the evolving customer needs. The agenda is packed…



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MarTech Europe is just 2 months away, don’t miss out!

We’re now less than two months away from MarTech Europe, which will take place in London on 1-2 November, and my anticipation is building. The high-velocity exchange of ideas and experiences at MarTech always teaches me so much about the rapidly evolving practice of marketing technology in B2B and…



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.


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Friday Round-up: CA protects reviewers and Facebook posts fade away

Another week is at an end and we’re that much closer to the holidays. Have you started shopping yet? Have you made your marketing plan yet? Yes, you’re supposed to have a plan. Before you do that, take a look at these quick hit stories from the past week.

Pinterest on Chrome

Pinterest for chrome

Chrome users can now choose to have a new Pinterest image show up every time they open a new tab. Pick from a variety of themes including Art, Sports, Gardening, Cute, Travel, Cats and more. But don’t get too excited – the images aren’t actually Pinterest pins. They’re specially chosen, high quality images from places like Artsy and National Geographic.

I think it would be cooler if the tabs showed a full page of random Pinterest pins, but that’s just me.

California Passes Negative Review Bill

California Governor Jerry Brown signed a bill designed to protect consumers who post negative reviews online. The bill makes it illegal to include a “non-disparagement clause” in a contract. The bill’s author, Assemblyman John A. Pérez, says companies often require customers to sign away their power to leave a negative review before entering into a contract and he thinks it’s not fair.

“No consumer should ever face penalties for voicing their opinions on the services or products they have purchased, and California law is now clear that no company has the ability to silence consumers.”

Instagram and Fashion

If you’re in the fashion industry, you should read this interview with Instagram’s Kevin Systrom on Women’s Wear Daily. He talks about the marriage of Instagram and fashion and details some of the unusual ways designers used the platform during New York Fashion Week.

Public School did a Hyperlapse behind-the-scenes video, and Coco Rocha did a Hyperlapse video of the Mango show. These are people who are going out of their way to use a new tool that is virtually untested in the fashion world, and [they are] finding it easy to incorporate into their story. We have come so far as a fashion community. It used to be, “Do you want to adopt social media?” Now, an app is launched by Instagram, and you’re adopting it within a day and using it to tell your story.


Now You See it, Now You Don’t

According to The Next Web, Facebook is testing a feature that will allow you to pre-schedule post deletion. At first, this sounds like a silly idea, but when you think about all of the outdated info that’s floating around in the Ethernet, it’s actually pretty smart.

Based on the screenshots we’ve seen, Facebook is letting users opt for anything from 1 hour to 7 days, after which the given status update will self-destruct and disappear from view.

This is the perfect feature for anyone who has a tendency to post while “impaired”. That way you can post your party photos for your friends to see knowing they’ll be long gone before your mom logs on to Facebook in the morning.

That’s it for me. See you all back here on Monday.

 

Marketing Pilgrim – Internet News and Opinion

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Premise for WordPress is Going Away: Grab a Copy and Save Before it’s too Late

Yes, it’s true. Our Premise landing page and membership site solution for WordPress is gone at the end of this week. And that means exactly what it sounds like … we’re discontinuing sales of the product.

Yes, this is the same software that we use at StudioPress to perform hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of digital transactions each month, and securely deliver the purchased products.

Yes, this is the very technology that powers MyCopyblogger, the free content library that has boosted our email subscriptions by 400% since its introduction in May. It’s also the same software that houses and manages our paid Authority training program of over 5,000 online publishers.

And yes, this is the same product that more than 11,300 webmasters rely on for advanced lead generation, digital sales, and membership site functionality for their WordPress sites.

So now you may be thinking …

Huh?

Premise has done its duty

In many ways, we built Premise for ourselves, as demonstrated by all the heavy lifting it does at StudioPress, MyCopyblogger, Authority and many of our other sites. But even building it for our own use had a larger purpose.

You see, we incorporated Premise into our own platforms to test, refine, and improve it so we could do something much grander. And we also put it through the wringer with over 11,000 other discriminating online publishers and marketers to make sure we got it right.

Mission accomplished. So now it’s time for Premise to go away, and the grander vision to come out to play.

Just to be clear, taking Premise off the market won’t affect those who own it. What I mean by that is:

  • We will continue to fully support all Premise owners.
  • We will continue to keep the software compatible with all WordPress updates.
  • We will continue to improve functionality and upgrade owners at no charge.

What we won’t do is sell it as-is anymore, at least after this Friday, December 13th. That’s right … we’re killing Premise on Friday the 13th after slashing the price (pay no attention to the gentleman in the hockey mask).

Last chance to buy Premise (and save, too)

Like any good “going out of business” sale, everything must go. And in this case, we’re saving you $ 70 off the regular price of Premise to make sure the place is fully cleaned out.

Head over to the site and check out everything Premise can do. We’ve already lowered the price from $ 165 to $ 95 at the site, so no coupon code or special link is necessary to lock in your savings.

Just keep in mind that when 5 pm Pacific time on Friday, December 13, 2013 rolls around, it’s curtains for Premise. Our money back guarantee, however, will naturally be honored for a full 30 days after your purchase, so no worries there.

Grab Premise today before it’s gone.

About the author

Brian Clark

Brian Clark is founder of Copyblogger and CEO of Copyblogger Media. Get more from Brian on .

The post Premise for WordPress is Going Away: Grab a Copy and Save Before it’s too Late appeared first on Copyblogger.

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Google’s Matt Cutts: Next Generation Of The Penguin Update “Few Weeks” Away

In March, Google’s chief web spam fighter Matt Cutts promised that the Penguin Update designed to fight spam would get a big refresh later this year. Today, Cutts gave an update — keep waiting. It’s still a few weeks off. Along the way, there’s some confusion about whether…



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3 Reasons Why Potential Customers Will Walk Away From Your Online Business

Have you ever wondered why it is that some online businesses thrive and continue to do so, while others just fail miserably?

It is interesting to observe the differences between successful online businesses and those that, while they have a presence, just are not profitable at all!

Knowing the reason why these businesses are successful should ultimately allow others to… Read the rest of this entry »

Entrepreneurs-Journey.com by Yaro Starak

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