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How To Start An Online Business Selling Services Other People Deliver (I Call It ‘Services Arbitrage’)

For seven years, from 2001 to 2007, BetterEdit.com was my main online business (I later sold it for $ 100,000 USD and eventually it was merged with some other companies by new owners). You can hear a short background story of how I started BetterEdit.com by pressing play on the video above. This was the first […]

The post How To Start An Online Business Selling Services Other People Deliver (I Call It ‘Services Arbitrage’) appeared first on Yaro.Blog.

Entrepreneurs-Journey.com by Yaro Starak

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Ask MarketingSherpa: Internship for international student in the US

How to get noticed when looking for an internship, with special advice for international students.
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Daily Search Forum Recap: February 15, 2019

Here is a recap of what happened in the search forums today, through the eyes of the Search Engine Roundtable and other search forums on the web…


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A Guide to Setting Up Your Very Own Search Intent Projects

Posted by TheMozTeam

This post was originally published on the STAT blog.


Whether you’re tracking thousands or millions of keywords, if you expect to extract deep insights and trends just by looking at your keywords from a high-level, you’re not getting the full story.

Smart segmentation is key to making sense of your data. And you’re probably already applying this outside of STAT. So now, we’re going to show you how to do it in STAT to uncover boatloads of insights that will help you make super data-driven decisions.

To show you what we mean, let’s take a look at a few ways we can set up a search intent project to uncover the kinds of insights we shared in our whitepaper, Using search intent to connect with consumers.

Before we jump in, there are a few things you should have down pat:

1. Picking a search intent that works for you

Search intent is the motivating force behind search and it can be:

  • Informational: The searcher has identified a need and is looking for information on the best solution, ie. [blender], [food processor]
  • Commercial: The searcher has zeroed in on a solution and wants to compare options, ie. [blender reviews], [best blenders]
  • Transactional: The searcher has narrowed their hunt down to a few best options, and is on the precipice of purchase, ie. [affordable blenders], [blender cost]
    • Local (sub-category of transactional): The searcher plans to do or buy something locally, ie. [blenders in dallas]
    • Navigational (sub-category of transactional): The searcher wants to locate a specific website, ie. [Blendtec]

We left navigational intent out of our study because it’s brand specific and didn’t want to bias our data.

Our keyword set was a big list of retail products — from kitty pooper-scoopers to pricey speakers. We needed a straightforward way to imply search intent, so we added keyword modifiers to characterize each type of intent.

As always, different strokes for different folks: The modifiers you choose and the intent categories you look at may differ, but it’s important to map that all out before you get started.

2. Identifying the SERP features you really want

For our whitepaper research, we pretty much tracked every feature under the sun, but you certainly don’t have to.

You might already know which features you want to target, the ones you want to keep an eye on, or questions you want to answer. For example, are shopping boxes taking up enough space to warrant a PPC strategy?

In this blog post, we’re going to really focus-in on our most beloved SERP feature: featured snippets (called “answers” in STAT). And we’ll be using a sample project where we’re tracking 25,692 keywords against Amazon.com.

3. Using STAT’s segmentation tools

Setting up projects in STAT means making use of the segmentation tools. Here’s a quick rundown of what we used:

  • Standard tag: Best used to group your keywords into static themes — search intent, brand, product type, or modifier.
  • Dynamic tag: Like a smart playlist, automatically returns keywords that match certain criteria, like a given search volume, rank, or SERP feature appearance.
  • Data view: House any number of tags and show how those tags perform as a group.

Learn more about tags and data views in the STAT Knowledge Base.

Now, on to the main event…

1. Use top-level search intent to find SERP feature opportunities

To kick things off, we’ll identify the SERP features that appear at each level of search intent by creating tags.

Our first step is to filter our keywords and create standard tags for our search intent keywords (read more abou tfiltering keywords). Second, we create dynamic tags to track the appearance of specific SERP features within each search intent group. And our final step, to keep everything organized, is to place our tags in tidy little data views, according to search intent.

Here’s a peek at what that looks like in STAT:

What can we uncover?

Our standard tags (the blue tags) show how many keywords are in each search intent bucket: 2,940 commercial keywords. And our dynamic tags (the sunny yellow stars) show how many of those keywords return a SERP feature: 547 commercial keywords with a snippet.

This means we can quickly spot how much opportunity exists for each SERP feature by simply glancing at the tags. Boom!

By quickly crunching some numbers, we can see that snippets appear on 5 percent of our informational SERPs (27 out of 521), 19 percent of our commercial SERPs (547 out of 2,940), and 12 percent of our transactional SERPs (253 out of 2,058).

From this, we might conclude that optimizing our commercial intent keywords for featured snippets is the way to go since they appear to present the biggest opportunity. To confirm, let’s click on the commercial intent featured snippet tag to view the tag dashboard…

Voilà! There are loads of opportunities to gain a featured snippet.

Though, we should note that most of our keywords rank below where Google typically pulls the answer from. So, what we can see right away is that we need to make some serious ranking gains in order to stand a chance at grabbing those snippets.

2. Find SERP feature opportunities with intent modifiers

Now, let’s take a look at which SERP features appear most often for our different keyword modifiers.

To do this, we group our keywords by modifier and create a standard tag for each group. Then, we set up dynamic tags for our desired SERP features. Again, to keep track of all the things, we contained the tags in handy data views, grouped by search intent.

What can we uncover?

Because we saw that featured snippets appear most often for our commercial intent keywords, it’s time to drill on down and figure out precisely which modifiers within our commercial bucket are driving this trend.

Glancing quickly at the numbers in the tag titles in the image above, we can see that “best,” “reviews,” and “top” are responsible for the majority of the keywords that return a featured snippet:

  • 212 out of 294 of our “best” keywords (72%)
  • 109 out of 294 of our “reviews” keywords (37%)
  • 170 out of 294 of our “top” keywords (59%)

This shows us where our efforts are best spent optimizing.

By clicking on the “best — featured snippets” tag, we’re magically transported into the dashboard. Here, we see that our average ranking could use some TLC.

There is a lot of opportunity to snag a snippet here, but we (actually, Amazon, who we’re tracking these keywords against) don’t seem to be capitalizing on that potential as much as we could. Let’s drill down further to see which snippets we already own.

We know we’ve got content that has won snippets, so we can use that as a guideline for the other keywords that we want to target.

3. See which pages are ranking best by search intent

In our blog post How Google dishes out content by search intent, we looked at what type of pages — category pages, product pages, reviews — appear most frequently at each stage of a searcher’s intent.

What we found was that Google loves category pages, which are the engine’s top choice for retail keywords across all levels of search intent. Product pages weren’t far behind.

By creating dynamic tags for URL markers, or portions of your URL that identify product pages versus category pages, and segmenting those by intent, you too can get all this glorious data. That’s exactly what we did for our retail keywords

What can we uncover?

Looking at the tags in the transactional page types data view, we can see that product pages are appearing far more frequently (526) than category pages (151).

When we glanced at the dashboard, we found that slightly more than half of the product pages were ranking on the first page (sah-weet!). That said, more than thirty percent appeared on page three and beyond. So despite the initial visual of “doing well”, there’s a lot of opportunity that Amazon could be capitalizing on.

We can also see this in the Daily Snapshot. In the image above, we compare category pages (left) to product pages (right), and we see that while there are less category pages ranking, the rank is significantly better. Amazon could take some of the lessons they’ve applied to their category pages to help their product pages out.

Wrapping it up

So what did we learn today?

  1. Smart segmentation starts with a well-crafted list of keywords, grouped into tags, and housed in data views.
  2. The more you segment, the more insights you’re gonna uncover.
  3. Rely on the dashboards in STAT to flag opportunities and tell you what’s good, yo!

Want to see it all in action? Get a tailored walkthrough of STAT, here.

Or get your mitts on even more intent-based insights in our full whitepaper: Using search intent to connect with consumers.

Read on, readers!

More in our search intent series:

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SurveyMonkey CEO: Our Enterprise Business is in Hyper-Growth Mode

Our business on the enterprise side is in hyper-growth mode, says SurveyMonkey CEO Zander Lurie. “We grew our new bookings 80 percent year-over-year,” says Lurie. “We booked our first $ 10 million quarter, our first million-dollar customer, and we signed up 11 percent more customers in the last quarter alone than we had over all these years. We’re a super disruptive survey software for the enterprise.”

Zander Lurie, CEO of SurveyMonkey, discussed the company’s Q4 earnings and their massive growth in enterprise bookings in an interview on CNBC and during their earnings announcement:

Our Enterprise Business is in Hyper-Growth Mode

We were thrilled with our earnings report for Q4. 2018 was a transformational year for the company where we reaccelerated revenue, generated really robust cash flow, and went public. We’re a 19-year-old company. We have had a lot of private shareholders for a long time and the lock-up expiration could well contribute to some of the selling supply today. But I’m super confident in our in our long term focus. If we deliver results, I know shareholders will profit as well.

We have a beloved brand and one of the largest footprints of users around the world with over 17.5 million active users. If you look at our business today, we have over 647,000 paying customers who sit inside of 345,000 different organizations, including paying user in 98% of the Fortune 500. Our business on the enterprise side is in hyper-growth mode. We grew our new bookings 80 percent year-over-year. We booked our first $ 10 million quarter, our first million-dollar customer, and we signed up 11 percent more customers in the last quarter alone than we had over all these years. We’ve got a lot of traction with a really world-class leadership team.

We’re a Super Disruptive Survey Software for the Enterprise

We’re a super disruptive survey software for the enterprise. We have a large footprint inside of so many companies where we have not been bought at a corporate IT level. These organizations in this environment need that secure collaborative software that we offer. Our open integration strategy has proven to be a winner. It’s a really competitive market, but it’s a huge multi-billion dollar global market.

Our largest competitor in Qualtrics just sold to SAP. That opens up a lot of greenfield for us as they steer into SAPs business. We’re steering more into a Microsoft and Salesforce ecosystem where we see a lot of room to grow in customer experience management, HR, and market research.

Critical to Understand the Sentiment of Your Constituents

It’s so critical to understand the sentiment and voices of the people who are your constituents. Whether it’s your employees or your customers or you are doing market research, trying to understand these really dynamic environments, understanding the voices and opinions of the people who matter to your business, is critical.

I too am surprised about Amazon pulling out there. I think the reaction and how quickly that’s changed in several months has been very surprising. Your gut instinct is helpful, but what’s really helpful is actually collecting the opinion data of the people who matter to you if you’re trying to launch a new product or doing a campaign test or to understand where to expand and what the reaction will be like from the community or government.

Organizations need to collect feedback from their most important constituents, so they can drive innovation and growth. In the internet economy, businesses must be data-driven and responsive to their customers. Companies must test campaign messages and pricing to renew customers. In an increasingly competitive war for talent, organizations are investing more in their employee culture. Understanding how to measure, benchmark, and act on the sentiment data define today’s agile and successful companies.

SurveyMonkey CEO: Our Enterprise Business is in Hyper-Growth Mode

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4 Ways to Improve Your Data Hygiene – Whiteboard Friday

Posted by DiTomaso

We base so much of our livelihood on good data, but managing that data properly is a task in and of itself. In this week’s Whiteboard Friday, Dana DiTomaso shares why you need to keep your data clean and some of the top things to watch out for.

Click on the whiteboard image above to open a high resolution version in a new tab!

Video Transcription

Hi. My name is Dana DiTomaso. I am President and partner at Kick Point. We’re a digital marketing agency, based in the frozen north of Edmonton, Alberta. So today I’m going to be talking to you about data hygiene.

What I mean by that is the stuff that we see every single time we start working with a new client this stuff is always messed up. Sometimes it’s one of these four things. Sometimes it’s all four, or sometimes there are extra things. So I’m going to cover this stuff today in the hopes that perhaps the next time we get a profile from someone it is not quite as bad, or if you look at these things and see how bad it is, definitely start sitting down and cleaning this stuff up.

1. Filters

So what we’re going to start with first are filters. By filters, I’m talking about analytics here, specifically Google Analytics. When go you into the admin of Google Analytics, there’s a section called Filters. There’s a section on the left, which is all the filters for everything in that account, and then there’s a section for each view for filters. Filters help you exclude or include specific traffic based on a set of parameters.

Filter out office, home office, and agency traffic

So usually what we’ll find is one Analytics property for your website, and it has one view, which is all website data which is the default that Analytics gives you, but then there are no filters, which means that you’re not excluding things like office traffic, your internal people visiting the website, or home office. If you have a bunch of people who work from home, get their IP addresses, exclude them from this because you don’t necessarily want your internal traffic mucking up things like conversions, especially if you’re doing stuff like checking your own forms.

You haven’t had a lead in a while and maybe you fill out the form to make sure it’s working. You don’t want that coming in as a conversion and then screwing up your data, especially if you’re a low-volume website. If you have a million hits a day, then maybe this isn’t a problem for you. But if you’re like the rest of us and don’t necessarily have that much traffic, something like this can be a big problem in terms of the volume of traffic you see. Then agency traffic as well.

So agencies, please make sure that you’re filtering out your own traffic. Again things like your web developer, some contractor you worked with briefly, really make sure you’re filtering out all that stuff because you don’t want that polluting your main profile.

Create a test and staging view

The other thing that I recommend is creating what we call a test and staging view. Usually in our Analytics profiles, we’ll have three different views. One we call master, and that’s the view that has all these filters applied to it.

So you’re only seeing the traffic that isn’t you. It’s the customers, people visiting your website, the real people, not your office people. Then the second view we call test and staging. So this is just your staging server, which is really nice. For example, if you have a different URL for your staging server, which you should, then you can just include that traffic. Then if you’re making enhancements to the site or you upgraded your WordPress instance and you want to make sure that your goals are still firing correctly, you can do all that and see that it’s working in the test and staging view without polluting your main view.

Test on a second property

That’s really helpful. Then the third thing is make sure to test on a second property. This is easy to do with Google Tag Manager. What we’ll have set up in most of our Google Tag Manager accounts is we’ll have our usual analytics and most of the stuff goes to there. But then if we’re testing something new, like say the content consumption metric we started putting out this summer, then we want to make sure we set up a second Analytics view and we put the test, the new stuff that we’re trying over to the second Analytics property, not view.

So you have two different Analytics properties. One is your main property. This is where all the regular stuff goes. Then you have a second property, which is where you test things out, and this is really helpful to make sure that you’re not going to screw something up accidentally when you’re trying out some crazy new thing like content consumption, which can totally happen and has definitely happened as we were testing the product. You don’t want to pollute your main data with something different that you’re trying out.

So send something to a second property. You do this for websites. You always have a staging and a live. So why wouldn’t you do this for your analytics, where you have a staging and a live? So definitely consider setting up a second property.

2. Time zones

The next thing that we have a lot of problems with are time zones. Here’s what happens.

Let’s say your website, basic install of WordPress and you didn’t change the time zone in WordPress, so it’s set to UTM. That’s the default in WordPress unless you change it. So now you’ve got your data for your website saying it’s UTM. Then let’s say your marketing team is on the East Coast, so they’ve got all of their tools set to Eastern time. Then your sales team is on the West Coast, so all of their tools are set to Pacific time.

So you can end up with a situation where let’s say, for example, you’ve got a website where you’re using a form plugin for WordPress. Then when someone submits a form, it’s recorded on your website, but then that data also gets pushed over to your sales CRM. So now your website is saying that this number of leads came in on this day, because it’s in UTM mode. Well, the day ended, or it hasn’t started yet, and now you’ve got Eastern, which is when your analytics tools are recording the number of leads.

But then the third wrinkle is then you have Salesforce or HubSpot or whatever your CRM is now recording Pacific time. So that means that you’ve got this huge gap of who knows when this stuff happened, and your data will never line up. This is incredibly frustrating, especially if you’re trying to diagnose why, for example, I’m submitting a form, but I’m not seeing the lead, or if you’ve got other data hygiene issues, you can’t match up the data and that’s because you have different time zones.

So definitely check the time zones of every product you use –website, CRM, analytics, ads, all of it. If it has a time zone, pick one, stick with it. That’s your canonical time zone. It will save you so many headaches down the road, trust me.

3. Attribution

The next thing is attribution. Attribution is a whole other lecture in and of itself, beyond what I’m talking about here today.

Different tools have different ways of showing attribution

But what I find frustrating about attribution is that every tool has its own little special way of doing it. Analytics is like the last non-direct click. That’s great. Ads says, well, maybe we’ll attribute it, maybe we won’t. If you went to the site a week ago, maybe we’ll call it a view-through conversion. Who knows what they’re going to call it? Then Facebook has a completely different attribution window.

You can use a tool, such as Supermetrics, to change the attribution window. But if you don’t understand what the default attribution window is in the first place, you’re just going to make things harder for yourself. Then there’s HubSpot, which says the very first touch is what matters, and so, of course, HubSpot will never agree with Analytics and so on. Every tool has its own little special sauce and how they do attribution. So pick a source of truth.

Pick your source of truth

This is the best thing to do is just say, “You know what? I trust this tool the most.” Then that is your source of truth. Do not try to get this source of truth to match up with that source of truth. You will go insane. You do have to make sure that you are at least knowing that things like your time zones are clear so that’s all set.

Be honest about limitations

But then after that, really it’s just making sure that you’re being honest about your limitations.

Know where things are necessarily going to fall down, and that’s okay, but at least you’ve got this source of truth that you at least can trust. That’s the most important thing with attribution. Make sure to spend the time and read how each tool handles attribution so when someone comes to you and says, “Well, I see that we got 300 visits from this ad campaign, but in Facebook it says we got 6,000.

Why is that? You have an answer. That might be a little bit of an extreme example, but I mean I’ve seen weirder things with Facebook attribution versus Analytics attribution. I’ve even talked about stuff like Mixpanel and Kissmetrics. Every tool has its own little special way of recording attributions. It’s never the same as anyone else’s. We don’t have a standard in the industry of how this stuff works, so make sure you understand these pieces.

4. Interactions

Then the last thing are what I call interactions. The biggest thing that I find that people do wrong here is in Google Tag Manager it gives you a lot of rope, which you can hang yourself with if you’re not careful.

GTM interactive hits

One of the biggest things is what we call an interactive hit versus a non-interactive hit. So let’s say in Google Tag Manager you have a scroll depth.

You want to see how far down the page people scroll. At 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100%, it will send off an alert and say this is how far down they scrolled on the page. Well, the thing is that you can also make that interactive. So if somebody scrolls down the page 25%, you can say, well, that’s an interactive hit, which means that person is no longer bounced, because it’s counting an interaction, which for your setup might be great.

Gaming bounce rate

But what I’ve seen are unscrupulous agencies who come in and say if the person scrolls 2% of the way down the page, now that’s an interactive hit. Suddenly the client’s bounce rate goes down from say 80% to 3%, and they think, “Wow, this agency is amazing.” They’re not amazing. They’re lying. This is where Google Tag Manager can really manipulate your bounce rate. So be careful when you’re using interactive hits.

Absolutely, maybe it’s totally fair that if someone is reading your content, they might just read that one page and then hit the back button and go back out. It’s totally fair to use something like scroll depth or a certain piece of the content entering the user’s view port, that that would be interactive. But that doesn’t mean that everything should be interactive. So just dial it back on the interactions that you’re using, or at least make smart decisions about the interactions that you choose to use. So you can game your bounce rate for that.

Goal setup

Then goal setup as well, that’s a big problem. A lot of people by default maybe they have destination goals set up in Analytics because they don’t know how to set up event-based goals. But what we find happens is by destination goal, I mean you filled out the form, you got to a thank you page, and you’re recording views of that thank you page as goals, which yes, that’s one way to do it.

But the problem is that a lot of people, who aren’t super great at interneting, will bookmark that page or they’ll keep coming back to it again and again because maybe you put some really useful information on your thank you page, which is what you should do, except that means that people keep visiting it again and again without actually filling out the form. So now your conversion rate is all messed up because you’re basing it on destination, not on the actual action of the form being submitted.

So be careful on how you set up goals, because that can also really game the way you’re looking at your data.

Ad blockers

Ad blockers could be anywhere from 2% to 10% of your audience depending upon how technically sophisticated your visitors are. So you’ll end up in situations where you have a form fill, you have no corresponding visit to match with that form fill.

It just goes into an attribution black hole. But they did fill out the form, so at least you got their data, but you have no idea where they came from. Again, that’s going to be okay. So definitely think about the percentage of your visitors, based on you and your audience, who probably have an ad blocker installed and make sure you’re comfortable with that level of error in your data. That’s just the internet, and ad blockers are getting more and more popular.

Stuff like Apple is changing the way that they do tracking. So definitely make sure that you understand these pieces and you’re really thinking about that when you’re looking at your data. Again, these numbers may never 100% match up. That’s okay. You can’t measure everything. Sorry.

Bonus: Audit!

Then the last thing I really want you to think about — this is the bonus tip — audit regularly.

So at least once a year, go through all the different stuff that I’ve covered in this video and make sure that nothing has changed or updated, you don’t have some secret, exciting new tracking code that somebody added in and then forgot because you were trying out a trial of this product and you tossed it on, and it’s been running for a year even though the trial expired nine months ago. So definitely make sure that you’re running the stuff that you should be running and doing an audit at least on an yearly basis.

If you’re busy and you have a lot of different visitors to your website, it’s a pretty high-volume property, maybe monthly or quarterly would be a better interval, but at least once a year go through and make sure that everything that’s there is supposed to be there, because that will save you headaches when you look at trying to compare year-over-year and realize that something horrible has been going on for the last nine months and all of your data is trash. We really don’t want to have that happen.

So I hope these tips are helpful. Get to know your data a little bit better. It will like you for it. Thanks.

Video transcription by Speechpad.com

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Romance Your Customers with Some Seriously Practical Business and Marketing Advice

Happy Valentine’s Day! Or if you’re not a fan, Happy Fake Emotional Obligation Day! Whether you’re hunting down a table…

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EU copyright directive poised to become law, includes licensing fees for search engines

Controversial ‘link tax’ and content filtering provisions part of the final language of the Directive.



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5 Steps to Protect Your Attention and Become a Better Thinker

“I didn’t have enough time.” More and more, when I hear this common explanation for why something didn’t get done,…

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